Top 48 Slang For 100 Bill – Meaning & Usage

The $100 bill, often associated with wealth and prosperity, has its own set of slang terms that have emerged over the years. From street lingo to pop culture references, these words and phrases add a touch of flavor and excitement to the world of currency. Join us as we unveil the top slang for the $100 bill and explore the intriguing stories behind each term. Get ready to impress your friends with your newfound knowledge of this intriguing underworld of money-talk!

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1. Benjamin

The term “Benjamin” is a nickname for the $100 bill, named after Benjamin Franklin, whose portrait appears on the bill.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ll pay you back with a Benjamin.”
  • In a conversation about finances, one might mention, “I’ve got a couple of Benjamins in my wallet.”
  • A person boasting about their wealth might say, “I make it rain Benjamins at the club.”

2. C-note

The term “C-note” is a slang term used to refer to a $100 bill. The “C” stands for “century,” representing the bill’s value of 100.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I just found a C-note on the ground!”
  • In a discussion about money, one might mention, “I need to save up a few C-notes for my vacation.”
  • A person showing off their cash might say, “I always carry a wad of C-notes in my pocket.”

3. Hundo

The term “hundo” is a slang term used as a shortened form of “hundred.” It is often used to refer to a $100 bill.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ll give you a hundo for that concert ticket.”
  • In a conversation about expenses, one might mention, “I spent a hundo on dinner last night.”
  • A person bragging about their wealth might say, “I made a hundo in tips today.”

4. Big one

The term “big one” is a colloquial term used to refer to a $100 bill. It emphasizes the bill’s high value.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I paid for the new TV with a big one.”
  • In a discussion about cash, one might mention, “I found a big one in my jacket pocket.”
  • A person showing off their money might say, “I’ve got a wallet full of big ones.”

5. Blue face

The term “blue face” is a slang term used to refer to a $100 bill. It is derived from the blue color of the bill’s security features.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to break a blue face to cover my share of the bill.”
  • In a conversation about cash, one might mention, “I’ve got a couple of blue faces in my wallet.”
  • A person boasting about their wealth might say, “I’ve got stacks of blue faces in my safe.”

6. Franklin

This term is slang for a $100 bill, featuring a portrait of Benjamin Franklin, one of the Founding Fathers of the United States.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to break this Franklin into smaller bills.”
  • A person might brag, “I made it rain with a stack of Franklins at the club last night.”
  • In a discussion about currency, someone might ask, “Who is the person on the Franklin?”

7. Benji

This slang term refers to a $100 bill, featuring a portrait of Benjamin Franklin.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I can’t believe I lost a Benji on the way to the store.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you spare a Benji for gas money?”
  • In a discussion about wealth, someone might comment, “I wish I had a pocketful of Benjis.”

8. Century

This is a slang term for a $100 bill, with “century” referring to the number 100.

  • For example, someone might say, “I found a century under the couch cushion.”
  • A person might boast, “I made a century selling my old video games.”
  • In a discussion about money, someone might ask, “Who wants to trade a century for five 20s?”

9. Double sawbuck

This term refers to a $20 bill, with “double sawbuck” suggesting two $10 bills combined.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’ll give you a double sawbuck for that shirt.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you break a double sawbuck into smaller bills?”
  • In a discussion about currency, someone might comment, “I prefer using double sawbucks instead of larger bills.”

10. Big bill

This slang term refers to a $100 bill, emphasizing its high value.

  • For example, someone might say, “I paid for dinner with a big bill.”
  • A person might comment, “I always keep a big bill hidden in my wallet for emergencies.”
  • In a discussion about currency, someone might ask, “Who wants to trade a big bill for smaller denominations?”

11. One hundo

This term is a slang way of referring to a one hundred dollar bill. It is commonly used in casual conversations.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just found a one hundo in my pocket!”
  • A person might ask, “Can you break a one hundo?” when needing change.
  • In a discussion about money, someone might mention, “I saved up a few one hundos for my vacation.”

12. Blue hundo

This term refers to a one hundred dollar bill that has a blue security strip embedded in it. The blue hundo is a slang term used to distinguish it from other denominations.

  • For example, someone might say, “I prefer using blue hundos for larger transactions.”
  • In a discussion about counterfeit money, someone might mention, “Be careful, there are fake blue hundos circulating.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you break a blue hundo?” when needing change.

13. Benjamin Franklin

This term is a slang way of referring to a one hundred dollar bill, as it features a portrait of Benjamin Franklin, one of the Founding Fathers of the United States, on its front side.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I just found a Benjamin Franklin in my wallet!”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might mention, “I need a few Benjamin Franklins to pay for this.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you break a Benjamin Franklin?” when needing smaller bills.
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14. Big face

This term is a slang way of referring to a one hundred dollar bill. It is called “big face” because of the large portrait of Benjamin Franklin on the front side of the bill.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need some big faces for this shopping spree.”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might mention, “I’m saving up my big faces for a vacation.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have any big faces?” when needing cash.

15. Hundo dollar bill

This is a slang term for a one hundred dollar bill. It is often used in casual conversations or informal settings.

  • For example, “I just found a hundo dollar bill on the street!”
  • A person might say, “I need to save up some hundo dollar bills for my vacation.”
  • In a discussion about money, someone might mention, “I wish I had a stack of hundo dollar bills.”

16. Blue cheese

This is a slang term for a one hundred dollar bill. It is derived from the color of the bill, which has a blue hue.

  • For instance, “I’m saving up to buy a new car, and I’ve got a few blue cheeses already.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might say, “I need to withdraw some blue cheeses from the bank.”
  • A person might brag, “I made a big sale today and got paid in blue cheeses.”

17. Big ones

This is a slang term for one hundred dollar bills. It is often used to refer to a large amount of money.

  • For example, “I just won big at the casino and walked out with a stack of big ones.”
  • In a discussion about expenses, someone might say, “I had to pay a lot of big ones for that vacation.”
  • A person might complain, “I can’t believe how many big ones I had to spend on car repairs.”

18. One hundred clams

This is a slang term for a one hundred dollar bill. It is derived from the slang term “clams” which refers to money.

  • For instance, “I found a one hundred clam bill in my jacket pocket.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might ask, “Can you lend me a few one hundred clams until payday?”
  • A person might say, “I’m saving up to buy a new laptop, and I’ve already got a few one hundred clams.”

19. Big bills

This is a slang term for one hundred dollar bills. It is often used to refer to a large amount of money.

  • For example, “I need to withdraw some big bills from the bank to pay for the furniture.”
  • In a discussion about expenses, someone might say, “I had to shell out a lot of big bills for that vacation.”
  • A person might boast, “I just got paid in big bills for my latest freelance project.”

20. Hundy

This is a slang term used to refer to a one hundred dollar bill. It is derived from the word “hundred” and is often used in casual conversations or among friends.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just found a hundy on the street!”
  • In a discussion about money, a person might mention, “I need to save up a few hundys for my vacation.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you lend me a hundy? I’ll pay you back next week.”

21. Big bucks

This phrase is used to refer to a hundred dollar bill or a large amount of money in general. It implies that the amount of money is significant or substantial.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I just made a big bucks deal!”
  • In a conversation about expensive purchases, a person might mention, “That car cost me big bucks.”
  • A friend might ask, “How much did you spend on that vacation? Big bucks?”

22. Big boy

This term is used to refer to a one hundred dollar bill. It is a slang term that implies the bill’s value and importance.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just got paid with a big boy!”
  • In a discussion about money, a person might mention, “I need to save up some big boys for my rent.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you break a big boy? I need change for a smaller bill.”

23. Hundo stack

This phrase is used to describe a stack of one hundred dollar bills. It implies that the stack contains a hundred bills, totaling a significant amount of money.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I just won a hundo stack at the casino!”
  • In a conversation about wealth, a person might mention, “He’s got a hundo stack in his safe.”
  • A friend might ask, “How much did you withdraw from the bank? Was it a hundo stack?”

24. Big face hundo

This term is used to refer to a one hundred dollar bill that features a large portrait of Benjamin Franklin. It distinguishes the bill from other denominations and emphasizes its value.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just got paid with a big face hundo!”
  • In a discussion about currency, a person might mention, “The big face hundo is the highest denomination in US currency.”
  • A friend might ask, “Do you have change for a big face hundo? I need smaller bills.”

25. C-note stack

– For example, someone might say, “I just made a big purchase and paid in cash with a C-note stack.”

  • In a conversation about wealth, a person might boast, “I always carry a C-note stack in my wallet.”
  • A rapper might reference their wealth in a song lyric like, “I’m making it rain with my C-note stack.”

26. Benjamin stack

– For instance, someone might say, “I saved up and now I have a Benjamin stack.”

  • In a discussion about expensive purchases, a person might mention, “I just bought a new TV and paid for it with a Benjamin stack.”
  • A person showing off their wealth might say, “Check out my Benjamin stack, I’m ballin’.”

27. Big face Benjamin

– For example, someone might say, “I found a big face Benjamin in my pocket, lucky me!”

  • In a conversation about money, a person might mention, “I need to get my hands on some big face Benjamins.”
  • A rapper might brag about their wealth in a song lyric like, “I’m flexin’ with big face Benjamins, stackin’ up my ends.”

28. Hundo hundo

– For instance, someone might say, “I just got paid, and now I’m holding hundo hundos.”

  • In a conversation about money, a person might ask, “Do you have any hundo hundos to spare?”
  • A person showing off their wealth might say, “I’m making it rain with hundo hundos.”

29. Blue cheese hundo

– For example, someone might say, “I just got my paycheck, and it’s full of blue cheese hundos.”

  • In a conversation about finances, a person might mention, “I need to save up some blue cheese hundos for a vacation.”
  • A rapper might reference their wealth in a song lyric like, “I’m stackin’ up that blue cheese, hundos in my pocket.”

30. Franklin hundo

This slang term refers to a one hundred dollar bill featuring Benjamin Franklin’s portrait. It is often used in casual conversation or when referring to a large sum of money.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just made a Franklin hundo for doing a side gig.”
  • In a discussion about finances, someone might mention, “I need to save up a few Franklin hundos for a down payment.”
  • A person showing off their cash might say, “Check out this stack of Franklin hundos I just withdrew from the bank.”

31. Big bills stack

This slang term is used to describe a pile or stack of one hundred dollar bills. It implies a large amount of money.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I just made a big bills stack from my latest business venture.”
  • In a conversation about a successful investment, someone might mention, “He walked away with a big bills stack after selling his company.”
  • A person bragging about their wealth might say, “I keep a big bills stack in my safe just for emergencies.”

32. Benjamin’s hundo

This slang term refers to a one hundred dollar bill featuring Benjamin Franklin’s portrait. It is a casual way of referring to the bill, often used in everyday conversation.

  • For example, someone might say, “I found Benjamin’s hundo in my jacket pocket.”
  • In a discussion about a large purchase, someone might mention, “I paid for the new TV with Benjamin’s hundos.”
  • A person showing off their cash might say, “I’ve got a wallet full of Benjamin’s hundos.”

33. Blue cheese hundo stack

This slang term is used to describe a pile or stack of one hundred dollar bills. The addition of “blue cheese” adds a playful and exaggerated element to the term.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I just made a blue cheese hundo stack from my latest business deal.”
  • In a conversation about a successful investment, someone might mention, “He walked away with a blue cheese hundo stack after selling his artwork.”
  • A person bragging about their wealth might say, “I keep a blue cheese hundo stack hidden in my closet.”

34. Big face Benjamin hundo

This slang term refers to a one hundred dollar bill featuring Benjamin Franklin’s portrait. The term “big face” emphasizes the size of the bill and adds a sense of importance or value.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just found a big face Benjamin hundo in my old jeans.”
  • In a discussion about saving money, someone might mention, “I’m trying to accumulate more big face Benjamins in my savings account.”
  • A person showing off their cash might say, “Look at this big face Benjamin hundo I just got from the ATM.”

35. Hundo dolla bill

This slang term refers to a one hundred dollar bill. It is often used in informal or casual conversations.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just found a hundo dolla bill on the street!”
  • In a discussion about money, someone might mention, “I need to save up a few hundo dolla bills for my vacation.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you break this hundo dolla bill for me? I need smaller denominations.”

36. Blueback

This slang term is used to refer to a one hundred dollar bill. The term “blueback” is derived from the color of the bill.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I can’t believe I just spent five bluebacks on that meal.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might mention, “I need to withdraw some bluebacks from the bank.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have change for a blueback? I need smaller bills.”

37. Franklinstein

This slang term is a playful combination of the name “Franklin” (referring to Benjamin Franklin, whose portrait is on the one hundred dollar bill) and “Frankenstein.” It is used to refer to a one hundred dollar bill.

  • For example, someone might say, “I found a Franklinstein in my pocket!”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might mention, “I need to save up a few Franklinsteins for my vacation.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you break this Franklinstein for me? I need smaller denominations.”

38. Hundo grand

This slang term is used to refer to one hundred thousand dollars. It is often used in a casual or colloquial context.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I just won a hundo grand in the lottery!”
  • In a discussion about finances, someone might mention, “I need to save up a hundo grand for a down payment.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you lend me a hundo grand? I’ll pay you back next month.”

39. Blue note

This slang term is used to refer to a one hundred dollar bill. The term “blue note” is derived from the blue color of the bill.

  • For example, someone might say, “I found a blue note in my wallet.”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might mention, “I need to withdraw some blue notes from the ATM.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you break this blue note for me? I need smaller bills.”

40. Benjamins

This term refers to the one hundred dollar bills featuring Benjamin Franklin on the front. It is often used to casually refer to a large sum of money.

  • For example, “He made it rain with Benjamins at the club.”
  • A person might say, “I need to save up more Benjamins before I can buy that new car.”
  • In a conversation about wealth, someone might mention, “He’s rolling in Benjamins.”

41. Century stack

This term is used to describe a stack of one hundred dollar bills that adds up to one hundred dollars. It is often used in the context of showing off wealth or making a large purchase.

  • For instance, “He paid for his new sneakers with a century stack.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t believe he carries around a century stack in his wallet.”
  • In a discussion about financial goals, someone might mention, “My goal is to save up enough for a century stack.”

42. Hundo bill

This term is a shortened version of “hundred dollar bill.” It is often used in a casual or slang context to refer to a single one hundred dollar bill.

  • For example, “He handed the cashier a hundo bill for his purchase.”
  • A person might say, “I found a hundo bill on the street today.”
  • In a conversation about tipping, someone might mention, “I always leave at least a hundo bill for good service.”

43. Blue benji

This term combines the color blue with the nickname “benji” (which is short for Benjamin) to refer to a one hundred dollar bill. It is often used in a casual or slang context.

  • For instance, “He flashed a blue benji to impress his friends.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t believe she paid for that in cash – it was all blue benjis.”
  • In a discussion about counterfeit money, someone might mention, “Watch out for blue benjis – they’re often faked.”

44. Franklin note

This term refers to the one hundred dollar bill featuring Benjamin Franklin on the front. It is a more formal way to refer to the bill, often used in financial or business contexts.

  • For example, “He gave her a Franklin note as a thank you for her services.”
  • A person might say, “I need to exchange this Franklin note for smaller bills.”
  • In a conversation about currency design, someone might mention, “The Franklin note is one of the most recognizable bills in the world.”

45. Benjamin banknote

This is a slang term used to refer to a one hundred dollar bill, featuring the portrait of Benjamin Franklin. The term “benjamin” is often used as a shorthand for a one hundred dollar bill.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just found a benjamin in my pocket!”
  • In a discussion about money, someone might mention, “You’ll need a few benjamins to buy that luxury item.”
  • A person might brag, “I made a couple of benjamins from selling my old stuff.”

46. Century hundo

This slang term is a combination of “century” and “hundo,” both of which refer to one hundred. It is used to refer to a one hundred dollar bill.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’ll pay you back with a century hundo.”
  • In a conversation about expensive purchases, someone might mention, “I dropped a couple of century hundos on those designer shoes.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you break a century hundo? I need change for a smaller bill.”

47. Blue cabbage

This slang term combines the color blue with the term “cabbage,” which is a common slang term for money. It is used to refer to a one hundred dollar bill.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need some blue cabbages to pay for this new gadget.”
  • In a discussion about cash, someone might mention, “I’ve got a few blue cabbages stashed away for emergencies.”
  • A person might joke, “I wish I had a field of blue cabbages growing in my backyard.”

48. Big Benjamin Franklin

This slang term combines the size “big” with the name “Benjamin Franklin,” who is featured on the one hundred dollar bill. It is used to refer to a one hundred dollar bill.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I just got paid with a big Benjamin Franklin.”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might mention, “You’ll need a few big Benjamins to afford that vacation.”
  • A person might boast, “I can buy a lot of things with a stack of big Benjamin Franklins.”