Top 50 Slang For 100 Dollars Urban Dictionary – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to slang, the Urban Dictionary is the go-to resource for all the latest and greatest words and phrases. From everyday language to niche expressions, they’ve got it all covered.

In this listicle, we’ve scoured the depths of the Urban Dictionary to bring you the top slang for 100 dollars. Whether you’re looking to impress your friends or just want to stay up-to-date with the latest linguistic trends, this article has got you covered. So, buckle up and get ready to dive into the world of slang like never before!

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1. Benjamin

This term refers to the hundred-dollar bill, which features a portrait of Benjamin Franklin, one of the founding fathers of the United States. It is a colloquial way of referring to a one-hundred-dollar bill.

  • For example, “I just got paid, so I’m gonna break out a Benjamin and treat myself.”
  • In a conversation about expenses, someone might say, “That concert ticket cost me two Benjamins.”
  • A person showing off their cash might boast, “I’ve got a stack of Benjamins in my wallet.”

2. Benny

Similar to “Benjamin,” this term is another way of referring to the hundred-dollar bill. It is commonly used in urban slang and informal conversations.

  • For instance, “I need to withdraw some cash to get a few Bennies for tonight.”
  • In a discussion about money, someone might say, “I can’t believe I had to pay three Bennies for that repair.”
  • A person showing off their wealth might casually mention, “I always carry a few Bennies in my pocket.”

3. C-note

This term is derived from the Roman numeral for 100, “C.” It is a slang term for the hundred-dollar bill, often used in urban settings or among younger generations.

  • For example, “I saved up enough to finally break a C-note.”
  • In a conversation about expenses, someone might say, “I had to drop two C-notes on that new phone.”
  • A person boasting about their money might say, “I can make it rain with a handful of C-notes.”

4. Blue-faced

This term refers to the blue color used for the background of the redesigned hundred-dollar bill. It is a slang term used to describe the hundred-dollar bill.

  • For instance, “I just cashed my paycheck and got a few blue-faced bills.”
  • In a discussion about money, someone might mention, “I found a blue-faced bill on the ground and felt lucky.”
  • A person showing off their wealth might say, “I can make it rain blue-faced bills all night.”

5. Hundo

This term is a shortened version of “hundred” and is commonly used to refer to the hundred-dollar bill. It is a casual and convenient way of expressing the value.

  • For example, “I need to break a Hundo to pay for this dinner.”
  • In a conversation about expenses, someone might say, “I dropped a couple of Hundoes on those new shoes.”
  • A person boasting about their money might casually mention, “I can cover that bill with just a Hundo.”

6. Bill

In slang, “bill” is a common term used to refer to a one hundred dollar bill. It is derived from the image of Benjamin Franklin, who is featured on the front of the bill.

  • For example, someone might say, “I paid for that new video game with a bill.”
  • In a conversation about expensive purchases, one might mention, “I dropped a couple of bills on these designer shoes.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you break a bill? I need change for smaller denominations.”

7. One bill

The phrase “one bill” is a slang term used to represent one hundred dollars. It is derived from the fact that a one hundred dollar bill is often referred to as a “bill” in slang.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I can’t believe I spent one bill on concert tickets.”
  • In a conversation about saving money, one might mention, “I managed to save up one bill for my vacation.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you lend me one bill? I need to cover my rent.”

8. Buck

In slang, “buck” is a term used to refer to one dollar. It is a shortened form of the word “buckskin,” which was a common currency in early America.

  • For example, someone might say, “I only have a few bucks in my wallet.”
  • In a conversation about the cost of something, one might mention, “It’s just a few bucks, no big deal.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you lend me a buck? I need to buy a soda.”

9. Century note

The term “century note” is slang for a one hundred dollar bill. It is derived from the fact that the bill represents one hundred units of currency.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I found a century note on the ground, lucky me.”
  • In a conversation about high-value purchases, one might mention, “I dropped a century note on that new gadget.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you break a century note? I need smaller bills for the vending machine.”

10. Big one

The phrase “big one” is a slang term used to represent one hundred dollars. It is derived from the fact that a one hundred dollar bill is a high-value denomination.

  • For example, someone might say, “I paid a big one for these concert tickets, but it was worth it.”
  • In a conversation about expensive items, one might mention, “I saved up and bought a big one for my collection.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you lend me a big one? I need to cover my share of the dinner bill.”

11. Franklin

This term refers to the one hundred dollar bill featuring Benjamin Franklin, one of the Founding Fathers of the United States and a key figure in American history.

  • For example, “I just got paid and now I’ve got a Franklin in my wallet.”
  • A person might say, “I need to save up a few Franklins before I can afford that new gadget.”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might mention, “I found a Franklin on the street today!”

12. Greenback

This slang term is used to refer to any type of paper currency, but it is commonly associated with the American dollar bill due to its green color.

  • For instance, “I need some greenbacks to pay for this meal.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve got a pocketful of greenbacks, ready to spend.”
  • In a discussion about different currencies, someone might ask, “Do you prefer using greenbacks or coins?”

13. Yard

This term is used to refer to one thousand dollars. It originated from the idea that a thousand dollars, when stacked in one-dollar bills, would form a yard (three feet) in height.

  • For example, “I just won big at the casino and walked away with a whole yard.”
  • A person might say, “I need to save up a yard before I can afford that vacation.”
  • In a conversation about expensive purchases, someone might mention, “That car cost me a whole yard.”

14. Stack

This slang term is used to refer to one thousand dollars. It comes from the idea that a stack of one hundred dollar bills, when counted, would add up to a significant amount.

  • For instance, “I need to save up a stack for my upcoming bills.”
  • A person might say, “I just made a stack from my latest business venture.”
  • In a discussion about financial goals, someone might mention, “I’m aiming to have a stack in my savings account by the end of the year.”

15. Blue cheese

This slang term is used to refer to one thousand dollars. It is believed to have originated from the blue color of the one hundred dollar bills, which are often stacked together to form a significant amount.

  • For example, “I just made a deposit and now I’ve got some blue cheese in my account.”
  • A person might say, “I need to save up some blue cheese before I can afford that new gadget.”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might mention, “I found a stack of blue cheese in my grandpa’s old wallet!”

16. One hunnit

This slang term is a variation of “one hundred” and is used to refer to a hundred-dollar bill. It is often used in urban communities and in hip-hop culture.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just got paid, now I’m rollin’ with one hunnit in my pocket.”
  • In a song lyric, an artist might rap, “I make it rain, throwin’ one hunnit bills.”
  • A person discussing their financial goals might say, “I’m saving up to have one hunnit in my savings account.”

17. A bill

This slang term refers to a one hundred-dollar bill. It is a common way to casually refer to the specific denomination of the currency.

  • For instance, someone might ask, “Can you break a bill? I only have twenties.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might say, “I need to pay my rent, but all I have is a bill.”
  • A person might boast, “I made a quick hundred bucks by selling some old stuff. Just a single bill!”

18. Cool Benjamin

This slang term combines the word “cool” (meaning good or impressive) with “Benjamin” (a reference to Benjamin Franklin, whose portrait appears on the one hundred-dollar bill). It is used to refer to a one hundred-dollar bill in a cool or casual way.

  • For example, someone might say, “I found a cool Benjamin in my jacket pocket.”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might ask, “Can you lend me a cool Benjamin? I’ll pay you back next week.”
  • A person might show off their cash and say, “Check out this stack of cool Benjamins!”

19. Blue note

This slang term refers to a one hundred-dollar bill. The term “blue note” is derived from the blue color of the bill.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to break a blue note to pay for dinner.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might ask, “Do you have any blue notes? I need change for a twenty.”
  • A person might brag, “I just made a blue note by selling my old video game collection!”

20. Big blue

This slang term combines the words “big” (meaning significant or important) with “blue” (referring to the blue color of the one hundred-dollar bill). It is used to casually refer to a one hundred-dollar bill.

  • For example, someone might say, “I found a big blue in my wallet. Time to treat myself!”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might exclaim, “I just made a big blue from my side hustle!”
  • A person might show off their cash and say, “Look at this stack of big blues! I’m feeling rich!”

21. Blue face

This term refers to a hundred-dollar bill, which features a blue face on the front. It is often used to describe a large sum of money.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just made a blue face from my latest gig.”
  • In a conversation about expenses, one might mention, “I spent a blue face on that new gadget.”
  • A rapper might boast, “I’m making blue faces rain at the club tonight.”

22. Century

This term is a simple and direct way to refer to a hundred-dollar bill. It is derived from the fact that “century” is often used to describe a period of one hundred years.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to withdraw a century from the bank.”
  • In a conversation about money, one might ask, “Can you lend me a century?”
  • A person might complain, “I can’t believe I spent a whole century on that concert ticket.”

23. Rack

While “rack” can refer to a hundred dollars, in the context of slang for a hundred dollars, it is often used to mean one thousand dollars. The term may have originated from the idea of stacking one hundred-dollar bills to form a rack.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just made a rack from my side hustle.”
  • In a conversation about finances, one might mention, “I need to save up a rack for that vacation.”
  • A person might brag, “I made a rack in just one week.”

24. Big ones

This term is used to refer to large denomination bills, such as hundred-dollar bills. It emphasizes the value and importance of the money.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’ve got some big ones in my wallet.”
  • In a conversation about expenses, one might mention, “I had to pay with big ones for that luxury item.”
  • A person might boast, “I made a stack of big ones at the casino.”

25. Benji

This term is derived from the portrait of Benjamin Franklin, who appears on the hundred-dollar bill. It is a popular slang term for a hundred-dollar bill.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just found a Benji on the ground.”
  • In a conversation about money, one might ask, “Can you lend me a Benji?”
  • A person might exclaim, “I made five Benjis from my side gig!”

26. Hunnid

This term is a phonetic spelling of “hundred” and is often used in urban slang to refer to one hundred dollars.

  • For example, “I just paid a hunnid dollars for these sneakers.”
  • A person might say, “I need to save up a hunnid dollars for that concert ticket.”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might ask, “Can you lend me a hunnid dollars until payday?”

27. Hundo P

This term is a slang abbreviation for “hundred percent” and is often used to mean “completely” or “without a doubt”. In the context of money, “hundo P” refers to one hundred dollars.

  • For instance, “I’m hundo P sure I aced that exam.”
  • A person might say, “I’m hundo P on board with that plan.”
  • In a discussion about expenses, someone might mention, “I just dropped hundo P on a new pair of shoes.”

28. Grant

This term is slang for a fifty dollar bill. It is derived from the image of Ulysses S. Grant, the 18th President of the United States, who appears on the front of the bill.

  • For example, “I found a grant in my pocket and felt like I hit the jackpot.”
  • A person might say, “I need to break this hunnid into two grants.”
  • In a conversation about cash, someone might ask, “Do you have change for a grant?”

29. Benjamin Franklin

This term is slang for a one hundred dollar bill. It is named after Benjamin Franklin, one of the Founding Fathers of the United States, who appears on the front of the bill.

  • For instance, “I can’t believe I found a Benjamin Franklin in the couch cushions.”
  • A person might say, “I need to withdraw some Benjamins from the ATM.”
  • In a discussion about finances, someone might mention, “I just paid a Benjamin Franklin for that concert ticket.”

30. Big face

This term is slang for a one hundred dollar bill. It is called “big face” due to the large size of the face of Benjamin Franklin, who appears on the front of the bill.

  • For example, “I just got paid and all I see are big faces.”
  • A person might say, “I need to break this hunnid into some big faces.”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might mention, “I just made a big face for that car repair bill.”

31. Blue hunnids

This term refers to one hundred dollar bills, which are typically blue in color. It is a slang term used to describe a stack of one hundred dollar bills.

  • For example, “I made it rain with blue hunnids at the club last night.”
  • A person might say, “I had to break out the blue hunnids to pay for the expensive meal.”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might mention, “I’m saving up to have a stack of blue hunnids.”

32. Double sawbuck

This term refers to a twenty dollar bill. It comes from the slang term “sawbuck” which is used to describe a ten dollar bill. “Double sawbuck” is used to indicate two ten dollar bills or a twenty dollar bill.

  • For instance, “I only had a double sawbuck in my wallet, so I couldn’t afford to buy the concert tickets.”
  • A person might say, “I found a double sawbuck on the ground and considered it my lucky day.”
  • In a discussion about cash, someone might mention, “I prefer carrying double sawbucks instead of larger denominations.”

33. Cabbage

This term is slang for one hundred dollar bills. It is derived from the green color of US currency, which is similar to the color of cabbage leaves.

  • For example, “He paid for the car in cash, with a stack of cabbage.”
  • A person might say, “I need to hit the ATM and withdraw some cabbage for the weekend.”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might mention, “I’ve been saving up my cabbage for a vacation.”

34. Big money

This term is used to describe a significant amount of money, typically one hundred dollars or more. It emphasizes the value or importance of the money.

  • For instance, “He won big money at the casino last night.”
  • A person might say, “I need to make some big money to afford that luxury vacation.”
  • In a discussion about finances, someone might mention, “Investing in stocks can potentially earn you big money.”

35. Hundo stack

This term refers to one hundred dollars. It combines the word “hundo,” which is slang for one hundred, with “stack,” which is a slang term for a bundle of money.

  • For example, “I need to withdraw a hundo stack from the bank for the weekend.”
  • A person might say, “I won a hundo stack in a poker game last night.”
  • In a conversation about expenses, someone might mention, “I paid a hundo stack for those concert tickets.”

36. Franklin D

This term refers to the image of Franklin D. Roosevelt, the 32nd President of the United States, that appears on the front of the one hundred dollar bill. The nickname “Franklin D” is often used to refer to the bill itself.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’ll pay you back with a Franklin D.”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might mention, “I’ve got a couple of Franklin D’s in my wallet.”
  • A person might show off their cash and say, “Check out this stack of Franklin D’s I just got.”

37. Big Benjamin

This term is a play on words, combining the image of Benjamin Franklin, who appears on the one hundred dollar bill, with the nickname “Big Ben” often used to refer to the famous clock tower in London. “Big Benjamin” is a slang term for the one hundred dollar bill.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to save up some Big Benjamins for vacation.”
  • In a conversation about money, a person might mention, “I’ve got a few Big Benjamins stashed away.”
  • A person might boast about their wealth and say, “I’m rolling in Big Benjamins.”

38. Big face hunnids

This term is a combination of several slang words. “Big face” refers to the size of the one hundred dollar bill, which is larger than most other bills. “Hunnids” is a slang term for one hundred dollar bills. “Big face hunnids” is a colloquial term for one hundred dollar bills.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ve got a stack of big face hunnids.”
  • In a conversation about money, a person might mention, “I just made a big withdrawal of big face hunnids.”
  • A person might show off their cash and say, “Look at all these big face hunnids I’ve got.”

39. Double century

This term refers to a combination of two one hundred dollar bills, totaling two hundred dollars. “Double century” is a slang term often used to refer to this specific amount of money.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to save up for that vacation, I’m aiming for a double century.”
  • In a conversation about money, a person might mention, “I just got paid, I’ve got a double century in my wallet.”
  • A person might brag about their earnings and say, “I made a double century in just one day.”

40. Big bills

This term simply refers to one hundred dollar bills. “Big bills” is a colloquial term often used to refer to one hundred dollar bills, emphasizing their higher value compared to smaller denominations.

  • For example, a person might say, “I don’t carry small bills, only big bills.”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might mention, “I’ve got a bunch of big bills in my wallet.”
  • A person might show off their cash and say, “I’ve got nothing but big bills in here.”

41. Benjamin Banknote

This term refers to the one hundred dollar bill featuring Benjamin Franklin, one of the Founding Fathers of the United States. It is often used in informal conversations to refer to a hundred dollar bill.

  • For example, “I paid for the meal with a Benjamin banknote.”
  • A person might say, “I found a Benjamin banknote on the street!”
  • In a discussion about currency, someone might mention, “The Benjamin banknote is one of the highest denominations in circulation.”

42. Big Ben

This slang term is derived from the nickname “Big Ben” for the famous clock tower in London, England. It is used to refer to a one hundred dollar bill.

  • For instance, “I just got paid and now I have a few Big Bens in my wallet.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you break a Big Ben for me?”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might say, “I need to save up a few Big Bens for that vacation.”

43. C-note stack

This term is used to describe a stack of one hundred dollar bills, with “C-note” referring to the “C” in “century,” meaning one hundred.

  • For example, “He pulled out a C-note stack to pay for the car.”
  • A person might say, “I’m saving up for a new laptop, so I’ve got a C-note stack hidden away.”
  • In a discussion about wealth, someone might mention, “He’s always flashing his C-note stack to impress people.”

44. Blue hunnit

This slang term is used to refer to a one hundred dollar bill, with “blue” referring to the color of the bill.

  • For instance, “I can’t believe he paid with a blue hunnit.”
  • A person might say, “I found a blue hunnit on the ground!”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might mention, “I need to save up a few blue hunnits for that vacation.”

45. Benjamin Stack

This term is used to describe a stack of one hundred dollar bills, with “Benjamin” referring to Benjamin Franklin, whose portrait is on the bill.

  • For example, “He showed off his Benjamin stack to impress everyone.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been working hard and finally have a Benjamin stack.”
  • In a discussion about luxury, someone might mention, “He’s always flaunting his Benjamin stack to show off his wealth.”

46. Double hundo

This slang term is used to refer to a sum of two hundred dollars. It is often used in casual conversations or when discussing money.

  • For example, “I just won double hundo at the casino!”
  • A person might say, “I need to save up double hundo for that concert.”
  • In a discussion about expensive purchases, someone might mention, “That new gaming console costs a double hundo.”

47. Blue rack

This slang term is used to refer to a sum of one hundred dollars. It is often used in informal contexts or when discussing money.

  • For instance, “I owe you a blue rack for dinner.”
  • A person might say, “I spent a blue rack on those new sneakers.”
  • In a conversation about a bet, someone might say, “I bet you a blue rack that I can beat you in a race.”

48. Big boy

This slang term is used to refer to a sum of one hundred dollars. It is often used in casual conversations or when discussing money.

  • For example, “I just made a big boy payment on my credit card.”
  • A person might say, “I need to save up a big boy for that vacation.”
  • In a discussion about expensive purchases, someone might mention, “That designer bag costs a big boy.”

49. Big hundo

This slang term is used to refer to a sum of one hundred dollars. It is often used in informal contexts or when discussing money.

  • For instance, “I just found a big hundo in my pocket.”
  • A person might say, “I need to withdraw a big hundo from the ATM.”
  • In a conversation about splitting the bill, someone might say, “Can you spot me a big hundo?”

50. Blue hundy

This slang term is used to refer to a sum of one hundred dollars. It is often used in casual conversations or when discussing money.

  • For example, “I just made a blue hundy selling my old clothes.”
  • A person might say, “I need to save up a blue hundy for that concert ticket.”
  • In a discussion about expensive purchases, someone might mention, “That smartphone costs a blue hundy.”
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