Top 85 Slang For 20 Dollars – Meaning & Usage

If you’ve ever found yourself wondering what to call a twenty-dollar bill, you’ve come to the right place. We’ve scoured the depths of slang and language to bring you a comprehensive list of the most creative and catchy slang terms for a twenty-dollar bill. From “double sawbuck” to “two dimes,” this listicle is sure to enlighten you and maybe even make you chuckle. So, get ready to upgrade your money lingo and impress your friends with your newfound knowledge of slang for 20 dollars.

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1. Twenty spot

This term refers to a twenty-dollar bill, which is often referred to as a “spot” in slang.

  • For example, “I only have a twenty spot, so I can’t afford that item.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might say, “I need to save up some twenty spots before I can make that purchase.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you break a twenty spot? I need change for smaller bills.”

2. Fin

The term “fin” is slang for a five-dollar bill. It is derived from the German word “fünf,” meaning five.

  • For instance, “I found a fin on the street today.”
  • In a discussion about cash, someone might say, “I only have a fin left in my wallet.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you lend me a fin? I need some cash for lunch.”

3. Double sawbuck

This term refers to a twenty-dollar bill and is derived from the slang term “sawbuck” for a ten-dollar bill. “Double sawbuck” emphasizes that it is twice the value of a regular sawbuck.

  • For example, “I paid for the concert tickets with a double sawbuck.”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might say, “I need to withdraw some double sawbucks from the ATM.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you break a double sawbuck? I need smaller bills.”

4. Two dimes

The term “two dimes” is slang for twenty dollars. It refers to the fact that a dime is worth ten cents, and two dimes equal twenty cents, which is equivalent to twenty dollars.

  • For instance, “I need to borrow two dimes to buy lunch.”
  • In a discussion about expenses, someone might say, “I spent two dimes on coffee this morning.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you lend me two dimes? I need some cash for the bus.”

5. Two sawbucks

The term “two sawbucks” is slang for twenty dollars. A “sawbuck” is slang for a ten-dollar bill, so “two sawbucks” emphasizes that it is twice the value of a regular sawbuck.

  • For example, “I paid for the concert tickets with two sawbucks.”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might say, “I need to save up two sawbucks for that new video game.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you lend me two sawbucks? I need cash for the movie tickets.”

6. Two Hamiltons

This slang term refers to the twenty-dollar bill, which features a portrait of Alexander Hamilton, the first U.S. Secretary of the Treasury. “Two Hamiltons” is a playful way to refer to the bill.

  • For example, “Can you lend me two Hamiltons?” means “Can you lend me twenty dollars?”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might say, “I’ve got two Hamiltons in my wallet.”
  • A person might joke, “I’m feeling generous today, so I’ll give you two Hamiltons for that sandwich.”

7. Two Jacksons

This slang term also refers to the twenty-dollar bill, but this time it’s based on the portrait of Andrew Jackson, the seventh U.S. President, which is featured on the bill. “Two Jacksons” is another playful way to refer to the bill.

  • For instance, “I need to withdraw some cash. Can you give me two Jacksons?” means “Can you give me twenty dollars?”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might say, “I found two Jacksons in my pocket.”
  • A person might playfully ask, “Can you spare two Jacksons for a cup of coffee?”

8. Two blue faces

This slang term for the twenty-dollar bill comes from the blue color of the bill’s design. “Two blue faces” is a catchy way to refer to the bill.

  • For example, “I’ll give you two blue faces for that concert ticket” means “I’ll give you twenty dollars for that concert ticket.”
  • In a discussion about money, someone might say, “I’ve got two blue faces in my wallet.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have change for a blue face?” meaning “Do you have change for a twenty-dollar bill?”

9. Two saws

This slang term for the twenty-dollar bill originates from the fact that the Roman numeral for twenty is “XX.” The term “saw” is a shortened form of “sawbuck,” which is slang for a ten-dollar bill. So, “two saws” means “two twenties” or “forty dollars.”

  • For instance, “I’ll give you two saws for that video game” means “I’ll give you forty dollars for that video game.”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might say, “I need to withdraw some cash. Can you give me two saws?”
  • A person might say, “I found two saws in my jacket pocket.”

10. Double saw

This slang term for the twenty-dollar bill is similar to “two saws” and refers to having two twenties, or forty dollars. The term “double saw” emphasizes the idea of having double the value of a “saw” or ten-dollar bill.

  • For example, “I’ll give you a double saw for that concert ticket” means “I’ll give you forty dollars for that concert ticket.”
  • In a discussion about finances, someone might say, “I’ve got a double saw in my wallet.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you break a double saw?” meaning “Can you provide change for a forty-dollar bill?”

11. Deuce deuce

This term refers to a twenty-dollar bill. It is derived from the word “deuce,” which is slang for two, and “deuce deuce” is used to indicate two twenties, or a total of forty dollars.

  • For example, “I paid for dinner with a deuce deuce.”
  • A person might say, “I found a deuce deuce in my pocket, and it made my day.”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might ask, “Can you break a deuce deuce for me?”

12. Two tenners

This slang term refers to having two ten-dollar bills, which adds up to a total of twenty dollars.

  • For instance, “I only have two tenners left in my wallet.”
  • A person might say, “I need to withdraw some cash because all I have is two tenners.”
  • In a discussion about budgeting, someone might mention, “I set aside two tenners for groceries this week.”

13. Two sawbucks and a fin

This slang term refers to having two ten-dollar bills and a five-dollar bill, which adds up to a total of twenty-five dollars. The term “sawbuck” is slang for a ten-dollar bill, and “fin” is slang for a five-dollar bill.

  • For example, “I paid for the concert tickets with two sawbucks and a fin.”
  • A person might say, “I found two sawbucks and a fin in my jacket pocket.”
  • In a conversation about splitting the bill, someone might suggest, “Let’s each contribute two sawbucks and a fin.”

14. Two X’s

This term refers to having two twenty-dollar bills, which adds up to a total of forty dollars. The “X” represents the Roman numeral for ten, and two X’s indicate two twenties.

  • For instance, “I paid for the new video game console with two X’s.”
  • A person might say, “I found two X’s in my piggy bank.”
  • In a discussion about saving money, someone might mention, “I managed to save up two X’s for my vacation.”

15. Two dubs

This slang term refers to having two twenty-dollar bills, which adds up to a total of forty dollars. The term “dub” is derived from “double,” indicating a double-digit denomination.

  • For example, “I paid for my concert tickets with two dubs.”
  • A person might say, “I found two dubs in my wallet and treated myself.”
  • In a conversation about expensive purchases, someone might ask, “Can you lend me two dubs?”

16. Two twenties

This slang term refers to having two twenty-dollar bills, equaling a total of forty dollars. It is often used when referring to a specific amount of money.

  • For example, “I had to pay fifty dollars for the concert ticket, so I gave the cashier two twenties.”
  • A person might say, “I found two twenties in my pocket, so I treated myself to a nice dinner.”
  • In a conversation about splitting the bill, someone might suggest, “Let’s each contribute two twenties and split the rest evenly.”

17. Two greenbacks

This slang term refers to having two one-dollar bills, equaling a total of two dollars. It is derived from the color of the bills, which are primarily green.

  • For instance, “I only had two greenbacks in my wallet, so I couldn’t afford the item.”
  • A person might say, “I found two greenbacks on the ground, so I bought a snack.”
  • In a discussion about saving money, someone might mention, “I always try to have at least two greenbacks in my wallet for emergencies.”

18. Score

This slang term refers to a twenty-dollar bill. It is commonly used in informal conversations to refer to a specific amount of money.

  • For example, “I found a score in my jacket pocket, so I treated myself to a movie.”
  • A person might say, “I need to save up a score to buy that new video game.”
  • In a discussion about budgeting, someone might mention, “I try to set aside a score each month for unexpected expenses.”

19. Two tens

This slang term refers to having two ten-dollar bills, equaling a total of twenty dollars. It is often used when referring to a specific amount of money.

  • For instance, “I gave the cashier two tens for the item I purchased.”
  • A person might say, “I found two tens in my wallet, so I decided to buy a book.”
  • In a conversation about splitting the bill, someone might suggest, “Let’s each contribute two tens and split the rest evenly.”

20. 20 bones

This slang term refers to a twenty-dollar bill. It is derived from the term “bones” as a playful way to refer to money.

  • For example, “I need to withdraw 20 bones from the ATM for the concert tickets.”
  • A person might say, “I found 20 bones in my pocket, so I treated myself to a small gift.”
  • In a discussion about budgeting, someone might mention, “I try to save at least 20 bones each week for future expenses.”

21. 20 bucks

This is a common slang term for a twenty-dollar bill. It is often used in casual conversations or when referring to the cost of something.

  • For example, “I owe you 20 bucks for lunch.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you lend me 20 bucks until payday?”
  • Someone might say, “I found 20 bucks on the street today!”

22. 20 smackers

This is another slang term for a twenty-dollar bill. It is similar to “20 bucks” and is often used interchangeably.

  • For instance, “I’ll pay you back with 20 smackers.”
  • A person might say, “I only have 20 smackers on me, is that enough?”
  • Someone might exclaim, “I won 20 smackers in a bet!”

23. 20 clams

This slang term for a twenty-dollar bill is derived from the resemblance between a folded bill and a clamshell. It is a more playful and lighthearted way to refer to a twenty-dollar bill.

  • For example, “I need to save up 20 clams for the concert.”
  • A person might say, “I found 20 clams in my pocket, lucky me!”
  • Someone might ask, “Can you lend me 20 clams until payday?”

24. 20 greenbacks

This slang term for a twenty-dollar bill comes from the green color of US currency. It is a more colorful way to refer to a twenty-dollar bill.

  • For instance, “I paid him back with 20 greenbacks.”
  • A person might say, “I need to withdraw 20 greenbacks from the ATM.”
  • Someone might comment, “I found 20 greenbacks in an old jacket pocket!”

25. 20 bills

This slang term for a twenty-dollar bill is a more straightforward way to refer to the currency.

  • For example, “I need to exchange this 20 bill for smaller denominations.”
  • A person might say, “I earned 20 bills from my part-time job.”
  • Someone might ask, “Can you break this 20 bill for me?”

26. 20 beans

This is a slang term for twenty dollars. It is derived from the idea that the word “beans” sounds similar to “bucks,” which is another term for dollars.

  • For example, “I’ll give you 20 beans for that concert ticket.”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might say, “I need to save up 20 beans for a new phone.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you lend me 20 beans until payday?”

27. 20 stacks

This is a slang term for twenty dollars. It comes from the idea that a stack of money is usually in the form of multiple bills stacked on top of each other.

  • For instance, “I spent 20 stacks on these new shoes.”
  • In a discussion about finances, someone might say, “I need to save up 20 stacks for a down payment.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you lend me 20 stacks? I’ll pay you back next week.”

28. 20 large

This is a slang term for twenty dollars. The word “large” is used to emphasize the amount of money, similar to saying “big bucks.”

  • For example, “I paid 20 large for this designer handbag.”
  • In a conversation about expenses, someone might say, “I need to come up with 20 large for my car repairs.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have 20 large I can borrow? I’ll pay you back next month.”

29. 20 grand

This is a slang term for twenty dollars. The word “grand” is often used to refer to a thousand dollars, so 20 grand would be 20 thousand dollars. However, in this context, it specifically means twenty dollars.

  • For instance, “I only have 20 grand left in my wallet.”
  • In a discussion about money, someone might say, “I need to find a way to make 20 grand quickly.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you lend me 20 grand? I promise to pay you back next week.”

30. 20 notes

This is a slang term for twenty dollars. The word “notes” is often used to refer to paper money or banknotes.

  • For example, “I’ll give you 20 notes for that video game.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might say, “I need to save up 20 notes for a new laptop.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you lend me 20 notes? I’ll pay you back on Friday.”

31. 20 simoleons

Simoleons is a slang term used to refer to money in general. It is often used humorously or playfully to describe a specific amount of money.

  • For example, “I just spent 20 simoleons on a new shirt.”
  • A person might say, “I need to save up 20 simoleons for that concert ticket.”
  • In a casual conversation about finances, someone might mention, “I only have 20 simoleons left in my wallet.”

32. 20 quid

Quid is a slang term used to refer to British pounds. It is commonly used in the UK and Ireland.

  • For instance, “I owe you 20 quid for the dinner.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you lend me 20 quid until payday?”
  • In a conversation about travel expenses, someone might mention, “I spent 20 quid on a souvenir.”

33. 20 nicker

Nicker is a slang term used to refer to money, particularly British pounds. It is often used informally or colloquially.

  • For example, “I found 20 nicker in my pocket.”
  • A person might say, “I need to borrow 20 nicker to buy groceries.”
  • In a discussion about budgeting, someone might mention, “I saved 20 nicker by cooking at home instead of eating out.”

34. 20 squid

Squid is a slang term used to refer to money, especially British pounds. It is a playful term often used in casual conversations.

  • For instance, “I need to withdraw 20 squid from the ATM.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you lend me 20 squid until next week?”
  • In a conversation about shopping, someone might mention, “I bought this shirt for 20 squid.”

35. 20 smackeroos

Smackeroos is a slang term used to refer to money in general. It is a playful and lighthearted term often used to emphasize a specific amount of money.

  • For example, “I just made 20 smackeroos selling my old clothes.”
  • A person might say, “I need to save up 20 smackeroos for that concert.”
  • In a conversation about expenses, someone might mention, “I spent 20 smackeroos on dinner last night.”

36. 20 ducats

This term refers to 20 dollars, with “ducats” being a slang term for money in general. It can be used to describe any amount of money, not just 20 dollars.

  • For example, “I need to save up 20 ducats for that concert.”
  • Someone might say, “I just found 20 ducats in my pocket!”
  • A person might ask, “Can you lend me 20 ducats until payday?”

37. 20 greenies

This slang term refers to 20 dollars. “Greenies” is a colloquial term often used to describe money, especially when referring to paper currency.

  • For instance, “I need to borrow 20 greenies to pay for lunch.”
  • A person might say, “I just earned 20 greenies for mowing the lawn.”
  • Someone might ask, “Can you spare 20 greenies for a coffee?”

38. 20 stacks of high society

This phrase is a humorous way to refer to 20 dollars. It implies that having 20 dollars elevates one’s social status or puts them in a higher socioeconomic class.

  • For example, “I just made 20 stacks of high society from my side hustle.”
  • A person might say, “I need to save up 20 stacks of high society for that designer handbag.”
  • Someone might ask, “Can you lend me 20 stacks of high society until payday?”

39. 20 big ones

This slang term simply refers to 20 dollars. “Big ones” is a common way to describe money, especially when talking about a specific amount.

  • For instance, “I just found 20 big ones in my jacket pocket.”
  • A person might say, “I need to save up 20 big ones for a new video game.”
  • Someone might ask, “Can you lend me 20 big ones until I get paid?”

40. 20 Benjamins

This term refers to 20 dollars, with “Benjamins” being a slang term for money. It specifically references the face of Benjamin Franklin, who appears on the $100 bill.

  • For example, “I just earned 20 Benjamins for a day’s work.”
  • A person might say, “I need to save up 20 Benjamins for concert tickets.”
  • Someone might ask, “Can you lend me 20 Benjamins until I can pay you back?”

41. 20 C-notes

This slang term refers to twenty-dollar bills, which are often referred to as “C-notes” because of the large “C” on the front of the bill, representing the Roman numeral for 100.

  • For example, someone might say, “I paid for dinner with 20 C-notes.”
  • In a conversation about money, a person might ask, “Can you break a 20 C-note?”
  • A slang term for a large amount of cash might be, “He’s got stacks of 20 C-notes.”

42. 20 dead presidents

This slang term refers to twenty-dollar bills, as they often feature the image of a deceased president, such as Andrew Jackson or Abraham Lincoln. It’s a playful way to refer to the currency.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to get some change for these 20 dead presidents.”
  • In a conversation about finances, a person might ask, “Can you lend me a couple of 20 dead presidents?”
  • A slang term for being wealthy might be, “He’s got a wallet full of 20 dead presidents.”

43. 20 Jacksons

This slang term refers to twenty-dollar bills, as they feature the image of Andrew Jackson, the seventh president of the United States. It’s a casual way to refer to the currency.

  • For example, someone might say, “I had to break a 20 Jackson to pay for parking.”
  • In a discussion about cash, a person might ask, “Can you spare a couple of 20 Jacksons?”
  • A slang term for having money might be, “He’s got a pocketful of 20 Jacksons.”

44. 20 Lincolns

This slang term refers to twenty-dollar bills, as they feature the image of Abraham Lincoln, the sixteenth president of the United States. It’s a lighthearted way to refer to the currency.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I had to break a 20 Lincoln to buy lunch.”
  • In a conversation about finances, a person might ask, “Can you lend me a couple of 20 Lincolns?”
  • A slang term for having cash might be, “He’s got a wallet full of 20 Lincolns.”

45. 20 Washingtons

This slang term refers to twenty-dollar bills, as they feature the image of George Washington, the first president of the United States. It’s a colloquial way to refer to the currency.

  • For example, someone might say, “I had to break a 20 Washington to pay for gas.”
  • In a discussion about money, a person might ask, “Can you spare a couple of 20 Washingtons?”
  • A slang term for having cash might be, “He’s got a stack of 20 Washingtons.”

46. 20 sawbucks

This term is derived from the slang word “buck,” which is used to refer to a dollar. “Sawbuck” specifically refers to a ten-dollar bill, so “20 sawbucks” is a colloquial term for twenty dollars.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’ll give you 20 sawbucks for that old record player.”
  • In a conversation about the cost of a concert ticket, someone might mention, “I paid 40 sawbucks for these seats.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you lend me 20 sawbucks until payday?”

47. 20 double sawbucks

Similar to “20 sawbucks,” this term is derived from the slang word “buck” and refers to a twenty-dollar bill. However, the term “double sawbucks” is used to indicate the amount of forty dollars.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to save up 20 double sawbucks to buy that new video game.”
  • In a conversation about the cost of a meal, one might mention, “I spent 60 double sawbucks on dinner last night.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you lend me 20 double sawbucks? I’ll pay you back next week.”

48. 20 twenties

This term is a straightforward way of referring to the amount of four hundred dollars. It is derived from the fact that twenty multiplied by twenty equals four hundred.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to save up 20 twenties to buy that designer handbag.”
  • In a discussion about the cost of a vacation, one might mention, “I spent 40 twenties on my trip to Europe.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you lend me 20 twenties? I’ll pay you back as soon as I can.”

49. Two Lincolns

This term refers to twenty dollars and is derived from the image of Abraham Lincoln, the 16th President of the United States, on the front of the five-dollar bill. Two Lincolns, therefore, represents two five-dollar bills, which equals twenty dollars.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’ll give you Two Lincolns for that vintage comic book.”
  • In a conversation about the cost of a haircut, one might mention, “I paid Two Lincolns for a trim.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have change for Two Lincolns? I need some quarters for the laundry.”

50. Two deuces

This term refers to twenty dollars and is derived from the slang word “deuce,” which is used to refer to a two-dollar bill. “Two deuces” specifically refers to two two-dollar bills, which equals twenty dollars.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ll trade you this rare coin for Two deuces.”
  • In a discussion about the cost of a taxi ride, one might mention, “I paid Two deuces to get to the airport.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you lend me Two deuces? I’ll pay you back next week.”

51. Two dublins

This slang term refers to a sum of twenty dollars. It is often used in a casual or colloquial context.

  • For example, “Can you spot me two dublins for lunch?”
  • A person might say, “I only have two dublins left in my wallet.”
  • Another might ask, “Do you have change for two dublins?”

52. Two twenties on the nose

This phrase means that the amount of money is exactly twenty dollars, without any additional amount.

  • For instance, “The bill came out to be two twenties on the nose.”
  • A person might say, “I owe you two twenties on the nose.”
  • Another might state, “I paid two twenties on the nose for the concert tickets.”

53. Two twenties flat

Similar to “two twenties on the nose,” this phrase means that the amount of money is exactly twenty dollars, without any additional amount or change.

  • For example, “I gave the cashier two twenties flat.”
  • A person might say, “I need to borrow two twenties flat.”
  • Another might ask, “Can you break a fifty for two twenties flat?”

54. Two twenties even

This phrase also means that the amount of money is exactly twenty dollars, without any additional amount or change.

  • For instance, “I paid two twenties even for the meal.”
  • A person might say, “I have two twenties even in my wallet.”
  • Another might state, “I owe you two twenties even for the favor.”

55. Two twenties straight up

This slang term means that the amount of money is exactly twenty dollars, without any additional amount or change. It emphasizes the exactness of the sum.

  • For example, “I handed the bartender two twenties straight up.”
  • A person might say, “I need two twenties straight up for the bus fare.”
  • Another might ask, “Can you lend me two twenties straight up?”

56. Two twenties dead on

This slang phrase means that the amount is exactly 20 dollars, with no additional cents or change. It emphasizes the precision of the amount.

  • For example, “I paid for the concert ticket and it was two twenties dead on.”
  • When splitting a bill, someone might say, “If we each chip in two twenties dead on, we’ll cover it.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you lend me two twenties dead on? I need to buy something.”

57. Two twenties on the dot

Similar to “two twenties dead on,” this slang phrase means that the amount is exactly 20 dollars, with no additional cents or change. It emphasizes the precision of the amount, using the phrase “on the dot” to convey accuracy.

  • For instance, “I paid for the meal and it was two twenties on the dot.”
  • When discussing the cost of an item, someone might say, “It’s two twenties on the dot, no more, no less.”
  • A person might say, “I need to withdraw two twenties on the dot from the ATM.”

58. Two twenties to the penny

This slang phrase means that the amount is exactly 20 dollars, with no additional cents or change. It emphasizes the precision of the amount by using the phrase “to the penny.”

  • For example, “I paid for the groceries and it was two twenties to the penny.”
  • When discussing the cost of an item, someone might say, “It’s two twenties to the penny, not a cent more.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you lend me two twenties to the penny? I need to make a purchase.”

59. Two twenties right on

Similar to “two twenties dead on,” this slang phrase means that the amount is exactly 20 dollars, with no additional cents or change. It emphasizes the accuracy of the amount by using the word “right.”

  • For instance, “I paid for the movie tickets and it was two twenties right on.”
  • When discussing the cost of an item, someone might say, “It’s two twenties right on, not a penny more.”
  • A person might say, “I need to exchange my money for two twenties right on.”

60. Two twenties smack dab

Similar to “two twenties dead on,” this slang phrase means that the amount is exactly 20 dollars, with no additional cents or change. It emphasizes the precision of the amount by using the phrase “smack dab,” which means right in the middle or exactly on target.

  • For example, “I paid for the concert ticket and it was two twenties smack dab.”
  • When discussing the cost of an item, someone might say, “It’s two twenties smack dab, not a cent more or less.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you lend me two twenties smack dab? I need to buy something.”

61. Two twenties precise

This slang term refers to an amount of money that is exactly equal to 20 dollars. It emphasizes the precision and accuracy of the amount.

  • For example, “I paid two twenties precise for the concert tickets.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you lend me two twenties precise?”
  • When splitting a bill, someone might say, “Everyone owes two twenties precise.”

62. Two twenties spot on

Similar to “two twenties precise,” this slang term also refers to an amount of money that is exactly equal to 20 dollars. It emphasizes the accuracy and correctness of the amount.

  • For instance, “The total comes to two twenties spot on.”
  • A person might say, “I gave the cashier two twenties spot on and received my change.”
  • When discussing the cost of an item, someone might mention, “It’s a great deal, only two twenties spot on.”

63. Two twenties accurate

This slang term also refers to an amount of money that is exactly equal to 20 dollars. It emphasizes the precision and correctness of the amount.

  • For example, “I need to withdraw two twenties accurate from the ATM.”
  • A friend might ask, “Do you have two twenties accurate for the bus fare?”
  • When discussing the cost of a meal, someone might say, “It’s affordable, only two twenties accurate.”

64. Two twenties on the money

Similar to the previous terms, this slang term also refers to an amount of money that is exactly equal to 20 dollars. It emphasizes the accuracy and correctness of the amount.

  • For instance, “I handed the cashier two twenties on the money.”
  • A person might say, “I received two twenties on the money as change.”
  • When discussing the cost of an item, someone might mention, “It’s a fair price, just two twenties on the money.”

65. Two twenties on the button

This slang term also refers to an amount of money that is exactly equal to 20 dollars. It emphasizes the precision and correctness of the amount.

  • For example, “I paid two twenties on the button for the taxi ride.”
  • A friend might say, “I owe you two twenties on the button.”
  • When discussing the cost of an event ticket, someone might mention, “It’s a great deal, only two twenties on the button.”

66. Two twenties on the bull

This slang phrase refers to having two twenty-dollar bills. It is often used to indicate that someone has a total of forty dollars in cash.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I found two twenties on the bull in my pocket.”
  • In a conversation about splitting a bill, a person might say, “I can give you two twenties on the bull.”
  • A friend might ask, “Do you have change for a fifty?” and you can respond, “Sure, I have two twenties on the bull.”

67. Two twenties on the nose cone

This slang phrase also refers to having two twenty-dollar bills. It is similar to “two twenties on the bull” and is used in the same context.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to withdraw some cash. Can you give me two twenties on the nose cone?”
  • In a conversation about paying for a meal, someone might say, “I have two twenties on the nose cone, so I can cover my share.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you lend me some money? I only have two twenties on the nose cone.”

68. Two twenties on the dime

This slang phrase also refers to having two twenty-dollar bills. It is another way to indicate that someone has a total of forty dollars in cash.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I found two twenties on the dime in my wallet.”
  • In a discussion about budgeting, a person might say, “I can only afford to spend two twenties on the dime for entertainment this month.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you lend me some money? I need two twenties on the dime.”

69. Two twenties on the cent

This slang phrase also refers to having two twenty-dollar bills. It is yet another way to indicate that someone has a total of forty dollars in cash.

  • For example, someone might say, “I can give you two twenties on the cent for the concert tickets.”
  • In a conversation about shopping, a person might say, “I found a great deal on this jacket. It’s only two twenties on the cent.”
  • A friend might ask, “Do you have change for a hundred?” and you can respond, “Sure, I have two twenties on the cent.”

70. Two twenties on the penny

This slang phrase also refers to having two twenty-dollar bills. It is another variation of indicating that someone has a total of forty dollars in cash.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to pay my rent. Can you lend me two twenties on the penny?”
  • In a discussion about saving money, a person might say, “I managed to put aside two twenties on the penny every week.”
  • A friend might ask, “How much do I owe you?” and you can respond, “Just give me two twenties on the penny.”

71. Two blue faces and a nickel

This slang term refers to having two twenty-dollar bills and a five-cent coin. It is a colloquial way of referring to a total of twenty dollars.

  • For example, “I only have two blue faces and a nickel left in my wallet.”
  • A person might say, “I need to save up so I can have two blue faces and a nickel for that concert.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might mention, “I managed to save two blue faces and a nickel this week.”

72. Two jacks and a fin

This slang term refers to having two twenty-dollar bills and a five-dollar bill. It is a casual way of referring to a total of twenty dollars.

  • For instance, “I had to give my friend two jacks and a fin to pay him back.”
  • In a discussion about splitting a bill, someone might say, “I owe you two jacks and a fin.”
  • A person might mention, “I found two jacks and a fin in my pocket, so I treated myself to lunch.”

73. Two red notes and a nickel

This slang term refers to having two twenty-dollar bills and a five-cent coin. It is a playful way of referring to a total of twenty dollars.

  • For example, “I found two red notes and a nickel in my jacket pocket.”
  • In a conversation about a purchase, someone might say, “I paid with two red notes and a nickel.”
  • A person might mention, “I need to withdraw two red notes and a nickel from the ATM.”

74. Two tenners and a fin

This slang term refers to having two ten-dollar bills and a five-cent coin. It is an informal way of referring to a total of twenty dollars.

  • For instance, “I only have two tenners and a fin on me right now.”
  • In a discussion about splitting expenses, someone might say, “I can contribute two tenners and a fin.”
  • A person might mention, “I need to exchange my two tenners and a fin for smaller bills.”

75. Two double sawbucks and a fin

This slang term refers to having two twenty-dollar bills and a five-cent coin. It is a playful way of referring to a total of twenty dollars.

  • For example, “I found two double sawbucks and a fin in my pocket.”
  • In a conversation about a purchase, someone might say, “I paid with two double sawbucks and a fin.”
  • A person might mention, “I need to withdraw two double sawbucks and a fin from the bank.”

76. Two dubs and a fin

This slang term refers to having a total of 20 dollars, with “dubs” being a slang term for twenty-dollar bills and “fin” being a slang term for a five-dollar bill.

  • For example, someone might say, “I only have two dubs and a fin left in my wallet.”
  • In a conversation about splitting the bill, a person might say, “I’ll pay my share, which is two dubs and a fin.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you lend me two dubs and a fin until payday?”

77. Two twenties and a dime

This slang term refers to having a total of 20 dollars, with “twenties” being a slang term for twenty-dollar bills and “dime” being a slang term for a ten-dollar bill.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I found two twenties and a dime in my coat pocket.”
  • In a discussion about budgeting, a person might say, “I set aside two twenties and a dime for groceries.”
  • A friend might ask, “Do you have change for a twenty? I only have two twenties and a dime.”

78. Two tens and a sawbuck

This slang term refers to having a total of 20 dollars, with “tens” being a slang term for ten-dollar bills and “sawbuck” being a slang term for a five-dollar bill.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to withdraw some cash – can you give me two tens and a sawbuck?”
  • In a conversation about splitting the cost of a meal, a person might say, “I’ll pay my share, which is two tens and a sawbuck.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you lend me two tens and a sawbuck until next week?”

79. Two sawbucks and a tenner

This slang term refers to having a total of 20 dollars, with “sawbucks” being a slang term for five-dollar bills and “tenner” being a slang term for a ten-dollar bill.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I found two sawbucks and a tenner in my jacket pocket.”
  • In a discussion about budgeting, a person might say, “I set aside two sawbucks and a tenner for gas.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you break a tenner? I only have two sawbucks and a tenner.”

80. Two blue faces and a dime

This slang term refers to having a total of 20 dollars, with “blue faces” being a slang term for twenty-dollar bills and “dime” being a slang term for a ten-dollar bill.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to exchange these two blue faces and a dime for smaller bills.”
  • In a conversation about saving money, a person might say, “I managed to save up two blue faces and a dime.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you lend me two blue faces and a dime? I’ll pay you back next week.”

81. Two jacks and a sawbuck

This is a slang term for a twenty-dollar bill. It refers to the combination of two ten-dollar bills (jacks) and a five-dollar bill (sawbuck).

  • For example, “I need to withdraw some cash. Can you give me two jacks and a sawbuck?”
  • A person might say, “I found two jacks and a sawbuck in my old jacket pocket!”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might mention, “I only have two jacks and a sawbuck left in my wallet.”

82. Two red notes and a dime

This is another slang term for a twenty-dollar bill. It refers to the combination of two ten-dollar bills (red notes) and a ten-cent coin (dime).

  • For instance, “I’ll pay you back with two red notes and a dime.”
  • A person might say, “I found two red notes and a dime in my piggy bank.”
  • In a discussion about cash, someone might ask, “Do you have change for two red notes and a dime?”

83. Two tenners and a sawbuck

This is a slang term for a twenty-dollar bill. It refers to the combination of two ten-dollar bills (tenners) and a five-dollar bill (sawbuck).

  • For example, “I owe you twenty bucks. Here are two tenners and a sawbuck.”
  • A person might say, “I found two tenners and a sawbuck in my coat pocket.”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might mention, “I only have two tenners and a sawbuck left in my wallet.”

84. Two double sawbucks and a sawbuck

This is a slang term for a twenty-dollar bill. It refers to the combination of two twenty-dollar bills (double sawbucks) and a five-dollar bill (sawbuck).

  • For instance, “I need to pay you back. Here are two double sawbucks and a sawbuck.”
  • A person might say, “I found two double sawbucks and a sawbuck in my pants pocket.”
  • In a discussion about cash, someone might ask, “Can you break a fifty? I only have two double sawbucks and a sawbuck.”

85. Two dubs and a sawbuck

This is a slang term for a twenty-dollar bill. It refers to the combination of two ten-dollar bills (dubs) and a five-dollar bill (sawbuck).

  • For example, “I need some cash. Can you give me two dubs and a sawbuck?”
  • A person might say, “I found two dubs and a sawbuck in my wallet.”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might mention, “I only have two dubs and a sawbuck left in my pocket.”
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