Top 25 Slang For $5 – Meaning & Usage

Have you ever wondered what you can get for just $5? Well, we’ve got you covered with a list of the top slang phrases that can be yours for just five bucks. From the latest trendy expressions to the timeless classics, we’ve scoured the depths of the internet to bring you the most bang for your linguistic buck. Get ready to upgrade your vocabulary and impress your friends, all without breaking the bank!

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1. Fiver

This term is used to refer to a five-dollar bill. It is derived from the word “five” and is commonly used in informal contexts.

  • For example, “Can you lend me a fiver? I need it for lunch.”
  • A person might say, “I found a fiver in my pocket. Score!”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might mention, “I always keep a few fivers in my wallet for emergencies.”

2. Fin

This slang term is another way to refer to a five-dollar bill. It is derived from the German word “fünf,” meaning “five.”

  • For instance, “I owe you a fin. Remind me to pay you back later.”
  • A person might say, “I found a fin on the ground. Free money!”
  • In a discussion about cash, someone might ask, “Do you have any fins on you? I need change for a ten.”

3. Five-spot

This slang term is used to describe a five-dollar bill. It is derived from the fact that the bill features the number five and is commonly used in informal contexts.

  • For example, “I’m short on cash, can you spot me a five-spot?”
  • A person might say, “I found a five-spot in my jacket pocket. Lucky me!”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might mention, “I always keep a few five-spots in my wallet for small expenses.”

4. Abe

This term is used to specifically refer to a five-dollar bill that features the face of Abraham Lincoln, the 16th President of the United States.

  • For instance, “I only have Abes in my wallet. No ones or tens.”
  • A person might say, “I need to break this Abe into smaller bills. Can you give me change?”
  • In a discussion about currency, someone might ask, “Do you prefer Abes or Hamiltons?”

5. Lincoln

This slang term is another way to refer to a five-dollar bill that features Abraham Lincoln’s face. It is derived from the last name of the former president.

  • For example, “I’m going to the store with just a Lincoln in my pocket.”
  • A person might say, “I found a Lincoln on the street. Easy money!”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might mention, “I always carry a few Lincolns for small purchases.”

6. Five bones

This slang term refers to a five-dollar bill. It is derived from the idea that money is made from bones, which are a part of the body.

  • For example, “I found five bones in my pocket!”
  • A person might say, “I’ll give you five bones for that sandwich.”
  • Another might ask, “Can you lend me five bones until payday?”

7. Five bucks

This is a common slang term for a five-dollar bill. It is derived from the idea that the word “bucks” is used to refer to money in general.

  • For instance, “I need to borrow five bucks to buy lunch.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll give you five bucks if you can help me move.”
  • Another might ask, “Can you spare five bucks for a coffee?”

8. Five smackers

This slang term is used to refer to a five-dollar bill. The term “smacker” is a colloquial term for money.

  • For example, “I found five smackers on the ground!”
  • A person might say, “I’ll give you five smackers for that hat.”
  • Another might ask, “Can you lend me five smackers until payday?”

9. Five clams

This slang term refers to a five-dollar bill. The term “clam” is a colloquial term for money.

  • For instance, “I found five clams in my jacket pocket!”
  • A person might say, “I’ll give you five clams for that book.”
  • Another might ask, “Can you spare me five clams for lunch?”

10. Five greenbacks

This slang term is used to refer to a five-dollar bill. The term “greenback” is derived from the color of the U.S. dollar bills.

  • For example, “I found five greenbacks in my wallet!”
  • A person might say, “I’ll give you five greenbacks for that DVD.”
  • Another might ask, “Can you lend me five greenbacks until payday?”

11. Five beans

This slang term refers to five dollars. It is derived from the idea that beans are small and round, similar to coins.

  • For example, “I’ll give you five beans for that candy bar.”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might say, “I only have five beans left in my wallet.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you lend me five beans until payday?”

12. Five bills

This slang term also refers to five dollars. It is derived from the fact that five-dollar bills are commonly used and circulated.

  • For instance, “I’ll pay you back with five bills next week.”
  • In a discussion about finances, someone might say, “I need to save up five bills for my car payment.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have change for five bills?”

13. Nickel

This slang term specifically refers to a five-dollar bill. It is derived from the fact that the five-dollar bill often features the portrait of President Thomas Jefferson, whose face is nickel-colored.

  • For example, “I only have a nickel left in my wallet.”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might say, “Can you break a nickel for me?”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have a nickel I can borrow?”

14. Five dimes

This slang term refers to five dollars. It is derived from the fact that there are ten dimes in a dollar, so five dollars would be equivalent to fifty dimes.

  • For instance, “I’ll give you five dimes for that shirt.”
  • In a discussion about prices, someone might say, “I bought this book for five dimes.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you lend me five dimes until tomorrow?”

15. Five notes

This slang term also refers to five dollars. It is derived from the fact that five-dollar bills are often referred to as “notes” in financial contexts.

  • For example, “I’ll pay you back with five notes next month.”
  • In a conversation about expenses, someone might say, “I spent five notes on lunch today.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have change for five notes?”

16. Five quid

In British slang, “quid” is a term for the British pound. “Five quid” means five pounds.

  • For example, “I owe you five quid for the movie tickets.”
  • A person might say, “I found a great deal online, only five quid!”
  • In a conversation about expenses, someone might mention, “I can’t believe I spent five quid on a cup of coffee.”

17. Five coins

This term refers to five dollars, specifically in the form of coins.

  • For instance, “I found five coins in my pocket!”
  • A person might say, “I need to save up five coins to buy that toy.”
  • In a discussion about spare change, someone might mention, “I always keep five coins in my car for parking meters.”

18. Five pieces

This term refers to five dollars.

  • For example, “I need five pieces to buy lunch.”
  • A person might say, “I found five pieces on the street.”
  • In a conversation about expenses, someone might mention, “I only have five pieces left in my wallet.”

19. Five grand

This term refers to five thousand dollars.

  • For instance, “He spent five grand on a new TV.”
  • A person might say, “I need to save up five grand for a vacation.”
  • In a discussion about expensive purchases, someone might mention, “I can’t believe he paid five grand for a handbag.”

20. Five large

This term refers to five thousand dollars. “Large” is slang for a thousand dollars.

  • For example, “He won five large in the lottery.”
  • A person might say, “I need to save up five large for a down payment.”
  • In a conversation about financial goals, someone might mention, “I want to save five large by the end of the year.”

21. Five G’s

This slang term refers to a sum of five thousand dollars. The “G” in “Five G’s” stands for “grand,” which is a common slang term for one thousand dollars.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just won five G’s in the lottery!”
  • In a conversation about a big purchase, a person might mention, “I had to shell out five G’s for that new car.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you lend me five G’s? I’m short on rent this month.”

22. Five spot

This slang term simply refers to a five-dollar bill. The term “spot” is often used as a synonym for “dollar” in slang.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I found a five spot on the ground!”
  • In a discussion about tipping, a person might mention, “I always leave a five spot for good service.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you lend me a five spot? I forgot my wallet.”

23. Five ones

This slang term refers to five one-dollar bills. It is a way to specify the number of one-dollar bills without using the term “dollar.”

  • For example, someone might say, “I need five ones for the vending machine.”
  • In a conversation about splitting a bill, a person might mention, “I’ll give you five ones for my share.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you break a twenty? I need five ones.”

24. Five quarters

This slang term refers to a sum of one dollar and twenty-five cents. It is called “five quarters” because a quarter is worth twenty-five cents, and five quarters add up to one dollar and twenty-five cents.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to borrow five quarters to do laundry.”
  • In a discussion about loose change, a person might mention, “I found five quarters in the couch cushions.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you lend me five quarters? I need to buy a snack.”

25. Five nickels

This slang term refers to a sum of twenty-five cents. It is called “five nickels” because a nickel is worth five cents, and five nickels add up to twenty-five cents.

  • For example, someone might say, “I found five nickels in my pocket.”
  • In a conversation about spare change, a person might mention, “I only have five nickels left.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you lend me five nickels? I need to make a phone call.”
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