Top 66 Slang For 50 – Meaning & Usage

Reaching the milestone of 50 is a cause for celebration, and what better way to mark the occasion than with some slang that captures the spirit of this age? Whether you’re turning 50 or just curious about the language that comes with it, we’ve got you covered. Our team has scoured the internet to find the most hip and happening slang for 50 that will have you feeling like a teenager again. Get ready to embrace your fifties with style and flair!

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1. Fiddy

This is a slang term for the number fifty. It is often used in casual conversations or when referring to the number in a more lighthearted manner.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’ll be turning fiddy next week!”
  • In a discussion about age, a person might joke, “Life begins at fiddy!”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you lend me fiddy bucks until payday?”

2. Half a C-note

This phrase refers to the value of fifty dollars, which is half of a one hundred dollar bill. It is often used to describe the amount of money someone has or the cost of something.

  • For example, someone might say, “I only have half a c-note left in my wallet.”
  • In a conversation about expenses, a person might say, “The concert tickets cost half a c-note each.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you spot me half a c-note until I get paid?”

3. Five-O

This slang term is derived from the television show “Hawaii Five-O” and is used to refer to the number fifty. It is often used in a casual or playful manner.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’ll be turning five-o next month!”
  • In a conversation about age, a person might joke, “Life begins at five-o!”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you lend me five-o bucks until tomorrow?”

4. Half a Benjamin

This phrase refers to the value of fifty dollars, which is half of a one hundred dollar bill. It is often used to describe the amount of money someone has or the cost of something.

  • For example, someone might say, “I only have half a Benjamin in my wallet.”
  • In a conversation about expenses, a person might say, “The concert tickets cost half a Benjamin each.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you spot me half a Benjamin until payday?”

5. Two score and ten

This phrase is derived from the old English system of counting by scores, where a score represents twenty. “Two score and ten” refers to the number fifty and is often used in a more formal or poetic context.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I have lived for two score and ten years.”
  • In a historical discussion, a person might mention, “The battle lasted for two score and ten days.”
  • A poet might write, “I have journeyed through two score and ten winters.”

6. Half a Grant

This is a slang term for a $500 bill. The term “half a Grant” refers to the face on the bill, which is President Ulysses S. Grant.

  • For example, someone might say, “I found a Half a Grant in my grandfather’s old wallet.”
  • In a discussion about rare currency, one might mention, “Half a Grants are highly sought after by collectors.”
  • A person might say, “I wish I had a Half a Grant to spend on a shopping spree!”

7. Two quarters

This refers to the sum of two quarters, which equals fifty cents. It is a common way to represent the value of fifty cents.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need two quarters for the parking meter, that’s fifty cents.”
  • When discussing coin denominations, one might mention, “Two quarters make up fifty cents.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have two quarters? I need to make exact change for the vending machine.”

8. Two dimes and a nickel

This is another way to represent the value of fifty cents. It refers to the sum of two dimes (each worth 10 cents) and a nickel (worth 5 cents).

  • For example, someone might ask, “Can you lend me two dimes and a nickel? I need fifty cents.”
  • In a discussion about different combinations of coins, one might mention, “Two dimes and a nickel add up to fifty cents.”
  • A person might say, “I found two dimes and a nickel on the ground, now I have fifty cents!”

9. Two half-dollars

This refers to the sum of two half-dollar coins, each worth fifty cents. Together, they add up to one dollar.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I have two half-dollars, so I have one dollar.”
  • When discussing coin values, one might mention, “Two half-dollars equal one dollar.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you give me two half-dollars? I need to make change for a one-dollar bill.”

10. Two fivers

This is a slang term for a ten-dollar bill. The term “fiver” refers to a five-dollar bill, so “two fivers” means two five-dollar bills, which adds up to ten dollars.

  • For example, someone might say, “I found two fivers in my jacket pocket, now I have ten dollars.”
  • In a discussion about different denominations of currency, one might mention, “Two fivers make up ten dollars.”
  • A person might say, “I need to withdraw some cash, can you give me two fivers?”

11. Two Hamiltons

This phrase refers to having a total of twenty dollars, as Alexander Hamilton’s portrait is featured on the ten-dollar bill. It is a slang term used to indicate a specific amount of money.

  • For example, someone might say, “I only have two Hamiltons left, so let’s split the bill.”
  • In a conversation about budgeting, someone might mention, “I can only afford to spend two Hamiltons on groceries this week.”
  • A person might joke, “I found two Hamiltons in my pocket, looks like it’s my lucky day!”

12. Two Jacksons

This phrase refers to having a total of forty dollars, as Andrew Jackson’s portrait is featured on the twenty-dollar bill. It is a slang term used to indicate a specific amount of money.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to withdraw some cash – I only have two Jacksons left.”
  • In a discussion about saving money, someone might mention, “I managed to save up two Jacksons every week.”
  • A person might exclaim, “I found two Jacksons in my jacket pocket, I forgot I had them!”

13. Two Lincolns

This phrase refers to having a total of ten dollars, as Abraham Lincoln’s portrait is featured on the five-dollar bill. It is a slang term used to indicate a specific amount of money.

  • For example, if someone asks, “How much do I owe you?” you might reply, “Just two Lincolns.”
  • In a conversation about splitting expenses, someone might say, “We each owe two Lincolns for the groceries.”
  • A person might joke, “I found two Lincolns in my wallet, time for a coffee break!”

14. Two Washingtons

This phrase refers to having a total of two dollars, as George Washington’s portrait is featured on the one-dollar bill. It is a slang term used to indicate a specific amount of money.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Can I borrow some cash?” you might reply, “Sure, here are two Washingtons.”
  • In a discussion about inexpensive items, someone might mention, “I bought this snack for just two Washingtons.”
  • A person might exclaim, “I found two Washingtons in my pocket, time to treat myself to a small indulgence!”

15. Two finnies

This phrase refers to having a total of ten dollars, as the word “finny” is a slang term for a five-dollar bill. It is a playful way to indicate a specific amount of money.

  • For example, if someone asks, “How much is that toy?” a child might reply, “It’s two finnies!”
  • In a conversation about saving money, someone might mention, “I managed to save up two finnies this month.”
  • A person might playfully boast, “Look at me, I’m rolling in two finnies!”

16. Two sawbucks

This is a slang term for a twenty-dollar bill. The term “sawbuck” comes from the resemblance of the Roman numeral for ten (X) to the shape of a sawbuck, which is a frame or support used for sawing wood.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to break a two sawbucks for some change.”
  • In a conversation about cash, someone might ask, “Do you have any two sawbucks on you?”
  • A person might boast, “I found two sawbucks in my jacket pocket!”

17. Two stacks

This slang term refers to two thousand dollars. The term “stack” comes from the idea of a stack of one hundred one-dollar bills, which adds up to one hundred dollars. Therefore, two stacks would equal two hundred dollars.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I just won two stacks playing poker!”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might ask, “How much did you spend on that new TV? Two stacks?”
  • A person might say, “I need to save up two stacks before I can go on vacation.”

18. Two fifties

This slang term refers to one hundred dollars. The term “fifty” comes from the fact that a fifty-dollar bill has the number 50 printed on it.

  • For example, someone might say, “I owe you two fifties for the concert tickets.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might ask, “Can you lend me two fifties until payday?”
  • A person might say, “I just found two fifties in my coat pocket!”

19. Half a century

This slang term refers to a period of fifty years. The term “half a century” highlights the significant amount of time that has passed.

  • For instance, someone might say, “My grandparents have been married for half a century!”
  • In a conversation about milestones, someone might ask, “Can you believe we’re about to hit half a century since that event?”
  • A person might celebrate their own birthday by saying, “I’m turning half a century old!”

20. Fifty big ones

This slang term refers to fifty dollars. The term “big ones” is a colloquial way of referring to dollars.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just found fifty big ones in my jacket pocket!”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might ask, “How much did you spend on dinner? Fifty big ones?”
  • A person might say, “I need to save up fifty big ones before I can buy that new gadget!”

21. Five-oh

This slang term is used to refer to the police, specifically the police force. It originates from the television show “Hawaii Five-0,” which featured a fictional Hawaiian state police force. The term is often used to warn others about the presence of law enforcement.

  • For example, if someone sees a police car approaching, they might say, “Five-oh, hide your stash!”
  • In a conversation about avoiding trouble, someone might advise, “Watch out for the five-oh when you’re driving late at night.”
  • A person discussing a recent encounter with the police might say, “I got pulled over by the five-oh yesterday for speeding.”

22. Fifty nifty

This slang term is used to describe something that is cool, impressive, or interesting. It is often used to express admiration or approval.

  • For instance, if someone sees a new car and thinks it looks amazing, they might say, “That car is fifty nifty!”
  • In a discussion about a talented musician, someone might comment, “Their guitar skills are fifty nifty.”
  • A person describing a fun experience might say, “We had a fifty nifty time at the concert last night.”

23. Fifty grand

This slang term is used to refer to the amount of fifty thousand dollars. It is often used in informal conversations or when discussing large sums of money.

  • For example, if someone asks about the price of a luxury car, they might be told, “It costs around fifty grand.”
  • In a conversation about saving money, someone might say, “I managed to save up fifty grand for a down payment on a house.”
  • A person discussing their salary might say, “I make fifty grand a year.”

24. Fifty-spot

This slang term is used to refer to the amount of fifty dollars. It is often used in informal conversations or when discussing small amounts of money.

  • For instance, if someone owes their friend some money, they might say, “I’ll pay you back the fifty-spot tomorrow.”
  • In a discussion about the cost of a concert ticket, someone might say, “I got mine for just a fifty-spot.”
  • A person describing a good deal they found might say, “I bought this shirt for only a fifty-spot.”

25. Fifty bones

This slang term is used to refer to the amount of fifty dollars. It is often used in informal conversations or when discussing small amounts of money.

  • For example, if someone is asked how much they paid for a meal, they might respond, “It was only fifty bones.”
  • In a conversation about splitting the bill, someone might say, “I’ll give you fifty bones for my share.”
  • A person discussing the cost of a concert ticket might say, “I managed to snag one for just fifty bones.”

26. Fifty large

This phrase is slang for fifty thousand dollars. It is often used in casual conversations or in reference to a large sum of money.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just won fifty large in the lottery!”
  • In a discussion about expensive purchases, a person might mention, “That car costs fifty large.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you lend me fifty large? I’ll pay you back next week.”

27. Fifty clams

This phrase is slang for fifty dollars. It is a casual way of referring to a specific amount of money.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I spent fifty clams on this new shirt.”
  • In a conversation about a restaurant bill, a person might comment, “I only have fifty clams, so let’s split it.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you lend me fifty clams? I’ll pay you back tomorrow.”

28. Fifty smackers

This phrase is slang for fifty dollars. It is a colloquial way of referring to a specific amount of money.

  • For example, someone might say, “I found fifty smackers in my pocket!”
  • In a discussion about the cost of a concert ticket, a person might mention, “It’s gonna set you back fifty smackers.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you spot me fifty smackers? I’ll pay you back next week.”

29. Fifty stacks

This phrase is slang for fifty thousand dollars. It is often used in urban or hip-hop culture to refer to a large sum of money.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I just made fifty stacks from my latest album.”
  • In a conversation about a business deal, a person might comment, “I’m expecting to make fifty stacks from this partnership.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you lend me fifty stacks? I’ll pay you back as soon as I can.”

30. Half a century mark

This phrase is slang for fifty dollars. It is a playful way of referring to a specific amount of money.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ll give you this shirt for half a century mark.”
  • In a discussion about the cost of a concert ticket, a person might mention, “It’s gonna cost you half a century mark.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you lend me half a century mark? I’ll pay you back next month.”

31. Fifty greenbacks

This is a slang term for a fifty-dollar bill. It is often used in casual conversations or in a lighthearted manner.

  • For example, someone might say, “I owe you fifty greenbacks for that favor.”
  • In a joking manner, a person might ask, “Can you lend me fifty greenbacks? I promise to pay you back.”
  • A friend might say, “I found fifty greenbacks in my pocket. Let’s go out and celebrate!”

32. Fifty notes

This is another way of referring to a fifty-dollar bill. It is commonly used in informal settings or among friends.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to save up some fifty notes for my vacation.”
  • When discussing expenses, a person might say, “I spent five fifty notes on groceries this week.”
  • A friend might ask, “Do you have any spare fifty notes? I need change for the bus.”

33. Fifty beans

This is a slang term for fifty dollars. It is often used in casual conversations or among friends.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ll give you fifty beans if you can guess the answer.”
  • When discussing the cost of something, a person might say, “That new gadget costs fifty beans.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you lend me fifty beans? I’ll pay you back next week.”

34. Fifty bucks

This is a common slang term for fifty dollars. It is used in casual conversations and is understood by most English speakers.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I paid fifty bucks for this concert ticket.”
  • When discussing prices, a person might say, “I got this shirt on sale for fifty bucks.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you lend me fifty bucks? I’ll pay you back as soon as I can.”

35. Fifty dimes

This is a playful slang term for fifty dollars. It is often used in informal conversations or among friends.

  • For example, someone might say, “I found fifty dimes in my jacket pocket.”
  • When talking about money, a person might say, “I need to save up fifty dimes for that concert.”
  • A friend might ask, “Do you have fifty dimes? I want to buy this book.”

36. Fifty-fifty

This phrase is used to describe a situation where something is divided equally between two parties or options. It signifies a 50% chance or an even distribution.

  • For example, “Let’s go halfsies on the bill, fifty-fifty.”
  • In a negotiation, someone might say, “We need to reach a fifty-fifty agreement for this deal to work.”
  • When discussing a fair competition, one might comment, “The teams are evenly matched, so it’s a fifty-fifty chance of winning.”

37. Fifty shades of gray

This phrase is a play on the title of the popular book series “Fifty Shades of Grey.” It is used to describe a situation where there are many different options or variations.

  • For instance, “When it comes to fashion, there are fifty shades of gray.”
  • In a discussion about paint colors, someone might say, “I can’t decide which shade of blue to choose. There are fifty shades of gray in this swatch.”
  • When talking about choices in life, one might comment, “There are fifty shades of gray when it comes to career paths.”

38. Fifty on the dot

This phrase is used to indicate an exact or precise amount of something, typically money. It signifies the exact number without any additional or rounding up.

  • For example, “I owe you fifty on the dot.”
  • When discussing a payment, someone might say, “I’ll pay you back fifty on the dot tomorrow.”
  • In a conversation about a budget, one might comment, “I can only spend fifty on the dot for groceries this week.”

39. Half a century old

This phrase is used to describe someone or something that is 50 years old. It signifies the halfway mark of a century.

  • For instance, “My grandparents are celebrating their half a century old anniversary.”
  • When talking about the age of a building, someone might say, “This house is half a century old.”
  • In a discussion about historical events, one might comment, “The moon landing happened half a century ago.”

40. Fifty ways to leave your lover

This phrase is a reference to the song “50 Ways to Leave Your Lover” by Paul Simon. It is used to describe a situation where there are numerous ways, options, or strategies to accomplish something.

  • For example, “There are fifty ways to leave your lover, according to the song.”
  • When discussing problem-solving, someone might say, “Let’s brainstorm and come up with fifty ways to solve this issue.”
  • In a conversation about creativity, one might comment, “There are fifty ways to express yourself through art.”

41. Fifty-fifty chance

This phrase is used to describe a situation where the chances of something happening or not happening are equal.

  • For example, “There’s a fifty-fifty chance of rain tomorrow, so bring an umbrella just in case.”
  • In a game of chance, someone might say, “Let’s flip a coin to decide. It’s a fifty-fifty chance.”
  • A person discussing a risky investment might say, “I’m not sure if it will pay off or not. It’s a fifty-fifty chance.”

42. Fifty-fifty split

This term refers to dividing something equally between two parties or groups.

  • For instance, in a business partnership, the profits might be split fifty-fifty between the partners.
  • In a divorce settlement, assets might be divided fifty-fifty between the spouses.
  • A group of friends deciding how to split the bill might say, “Let’s do a fifty-fifty split.”

43. Fifty shades of awesome

This phrase is a play on words, referencing the popular book and movie series “Fifty Shades of Grey.” It is used to describe something that is incredibly cool, amazing, or impressive.

  • For example, “That concert last night was fifty shades of awesome!”
  • A person might say, “I just got a promotion at work. It’s fifty shades of awesome.”
  • Someone describing a thrilling experience might say, “Skydiving was fifty shades of awesome!”

44. Fifty shades of fabulous

Similar to the previous phrase, this term is a play on words and is used to describe something that is incredibly fabulous, glamorous, or impressive.

  • For instance, “Her outfit for the party was fifty shades of fabulous!”
  • A person might say, “I just redecorated my living room. It’s fifty shades of fabulous.”
  • Someone complimenting a friend’s cooking might say, “This dish is fifty shades of fabulous!”

45. Fifty shades of cool

Continuing the play on words, this phrase is used to describe something that is incredibly cool, stylish, or impressive.

  • For example, “That new car is fifty shades of cool!”
  • A person might say, “I just got tickets to the concert. It’s fifty shades of cool.”
  • Someone describing a trendy fashion item might say, “These shoes are fifty shades of cool!”

46. Five tens

This phrase is used as slang to refer to a sum of money equal to 50 dollars.

  • For example, “I spent five tens on that new video game.”
  • A person might say, “I owe you five tens for the concert tickets.”
  • Another might ask, “Can you lend me five tens until payday?”

47. Two and a half dozen

This phrase is used as slang to refer to the number 30.

  • For instance, “I have two and a half dozen cookies left.”
  • A person might say, “I need to buy two and a half dozen eggs for the recipe.”
  • Another might ask, “Can you give me two and a half dozen pencils?”

48. Half a yard

This phrase is used as slang to refer to a sum of money equal to 50 dollars.

  • For example, “I owe you half a yard for the concert tickets.”
  • A person might say, “I spent half a yard on that new video game.”
  • Another might ask, “Can you lend me half a yard until payday?”

49. Half a ton

This phrase is used as slang to refer to a weight of 50 pounds.

  • For instance, “I can lift half a ton at the gym.”
  • A person might say, “I lost half a ton in my weight loss journey.”
  • Another might ask, “Can you help me carry this box? It weighs half a ton.”

50. Half a hundred

This phrase is used as slang to refer to the number 50.

  • For example, “I have half a hundred dollars in my wallet.”
  • A person might say, “I need to buy half a hundred balloons for the party.”
  • Another might ask, “Can you give me half a hundred pens?”

51. Half a grand

This slang term refers to 500 dollars. It is a way of expressing a large amount of money in a casual and colloquial manner.

  • For example, “I just spent half a grand on a new TV.”
  • Someone might say, “I saved up half a grand to go on vacation.”
  • A person discussing their expenses might say, “I had to pay half a grand for car repairs.”

52. Five dimes

This slang term refers to 50 dollars. It is derived from the fact that each dime is worth 10 cents, and five dimes add up to 50 cents.

  • For instance, “I found five dimes on the street and now I have five dollars.”
  • Someone might say, “I spent five dimes on a cup of coffee.”
  • A person discussing their budget might say, “I can only afford to spend five dimes on lunch.”

53. Half a bill

This slang term refers to 50 dollars. It is a shortened form of “half a hundred-dollar bill,” emphasizing the value of the bill.

  • For example, “I paid half a bill for this concert ticket.”
  • Someone might say, “I owe you half a bill for that favor.”
  • A person discussing their expenses might say, “I spent half a bill on groceries this week.”

54. Half a hundo

This slang term refers to 50 dollars. It is a shortened and more casual form of “half a hundred,” emphasizing the value of the bill.

  • For instance, “I only have half a hundo left in my wallet.”
  • Someone might say, “I earned half a hundo for a day’s work.”
  • A person discussing their budget might say, “I can only afford to spend half a hundo on clothes this month.”

55. Half a stack

This slang term refers to 50 dollars. It is derived from the fact that a stack of cash typically consists of 100 one-dollar bills, so half a stack would be 50 dollars.

  • For example, “I paid half a stack for these concert tickets.”
  • Someone might say, “I saved up half a stack to buy a new phone.”
  • A person discussing their expenses might say, “I can’t spend more than half a stack on dinner tonight.”

56. Half a century note

This is a slang term for a fifty-dollar bill. It refers to the fact that the bill is worth fifty units of currency, which is often referred to as a “century” in slang.

  • For example, “I paid for my meal with a half a century note.”
  • A person might say, “I found a half a century note on the street today.”
  • In a discussion about money, someone might mention, “I always keep a few half a century notes in my wallet for emergencies.”

57. Half a Jackson

This is another slang term for a fifty-dollar bill. It is derived from the image of Andrew Jackson, the seventh president of the United States, who appears on the front of the bill.

  • For instance, “I need to break a half a Jackson to pay for this.”
  • A person might say, “I found a half a Jackson in my pocket.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might mention, “I only have half a Jackson left in my wallet.”

58. Half a pony

This is a slang term for fifty pounds, a unit of currency in some countries. The term “pony” is derived from the rhyming slang “pony and trap,” which means “crap.”

  • For example, “He owes me half a pony.”
  • A person might say, “I just withdrew half a pony from the bank.”
  • In a discussion about finances, someone might mention, “I need to save up half a pony for my vacation.”

59. Fifty sheets

This is a slang term for fifty dollars. The term “sheet” is often used as a colloquial term for a dollar bill.

  • For instance, “I just made fifty sheets from selling my old clothes.”
  • A person might say, “I need to save up fifty sheets to buy that new phone.”
  • In a conversation about expenses, someone might mention, “I spent fifty sheets on dinner last night.”

60. Fifty G’s

This is a slang term for fifty thousand dollars. The term “G’s” is derived from the abbreviation for “grand,” which is slang for one thousand dollars.

  • For example, “He just won fifty G’s in the lottery.”
  • A person might say, “I need to save up fifty G’s to buy a new car.”
  • In a discussion about finances, someone might mention, “I owe the bank fifty G’s.”

61. Fifty simoleons

This slang term refers to a sum of fifty dollars. It is derived from the word “simoleon,” which is a colloquial term for a dollar.

  • For example, “I spent fifty simoleons on dinner last night.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll give you fifty simoleons if you can fix my car.”
  • In a conversation about expenses, someone might mention, “I need to save up fifty simoleons for the concert tickets.”

62. Fifty spot

This slang term is another way of referring to a sum of fifty dollars. The word “spot” in this context means a certain amount of money.

  • For instance, “I owe you a fifty spot.”
  • In a discussion about splitting a bill, someone might say, “Everyone owes me a fifty spot.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you lend me a fifty spot until payday?”

63. Fifty pieces

This slang term is yet another way of referring to a sum of fifty dollars. The term “pieces” in this context means units of currency.

  • For example, “I found fifty pieces in my pocket.”
  • In a conversation about a debt, someone might say, “You owe me fifty pieces.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you lend me fifty pieces until I get paid?”

64. Fifty racks

This slang term refers to a sum of fifty thousand dollars. The word “rack” in this context means a thousand dollars.

  • For instance, “He made fifty racks from his latest business venture.”
  • In a discussion about a large purchase, someone might say, “I just dropped fifty racks on a new car.”
  • A person might ask, “How much does that luxury watch cost? Fifty racks?”

65. Fifty grand worth

This slang term is another way of referring to a sum of fifty thousand dollars. The word “grand” in this context means a thousand dollars, and “worth” indicates the value.

  • For example, “He inherited fifty grand worth of assets.”
  • In a conversation about a financial loss, someone might say, “I lost fifty grand worth of investments.”
  • A person might ask, “How much did you spend on that vacation? Fifty grand worth?”

66. Fifty smacks

This slang term is used to refer to a sum of fifty dollars. It is often used in informal or casual contexts.

  • For example, “I owe you fifty smacks for that concert ticket.”
  • In a conversation about expenses, someone might say, “I had to spend fifty smacks on groceries this week.”
  • A person discussing a financial transaction might ask, “Can you lend me fifty smacks until payday?”
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