Top 69 Slang For According-To – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to expressing different perspectives or attributing information to a specific source, the English language has a plethora of slang terms up its sleeve. From casual conversations to academic writing, finding the right slang for “according to” can add flair and authenticity to your speech or writing. In this listicle, we’ve gathered the top slang phrases and expressions that will help you spice up your language game and keep up with the latest trends. So, let’s dive in and discover the hippest ways to say “according to”!

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1. AFAIK

This acronym is used to indicate that the information being shared is based on the speaker’s knowledge or understanding, but may not be completely accurate or definitive.

  • For example, a person might say, “AFAIK, the meeting is scheduled for next Tuesday.”
  • In a discussion about a current event, someone might comment, “AFAIK, the new law hasn’t been passed yet.”
  • Another might say, “AFAIK, the store closes at 9pm on weekdays.”

2. IIRC

This acronym is used to indicate that the information being shared is based on the speaker’s memory and may not be completely accurate or reliable.

  • For instance, someone might say, “IIRC, we met at that restaurant last year.”
  • In a conversation about a past event, a person might comment, “IIRC, the concert was in July.”
  • Another might say, “IIRC, the book was published in the early 2000s.”

3. IMO

This acronym is used to indicate that the statement being made is the speaker’s personal viewpoint or belief.

  • For example, someone might say, “IMO, pineapple belongs on pizza.”
  • In a discussion about a movie, a person might comment, “IMO, the ending was disappointing.”
  • Another might say, “IMO, exercise is essential for maintaining good health.”

4. IMHO

This acronym is used to indicate that the statement being made is the speaker’s personal viewpoint or belief, but is stated in a more modest or humble manner.

  • For instance, someone might say, “IMHO, the team played well but could have done better.”
  • In a conversation about a controversial topic, a person might comment, “IMHO, it’s important to consider multiple perspectives.”
  • Another might say, “IMHO, the new album is a step in the right direction for the artist.”

5. TBH

This acronym is used to indicate that the statement being made is an honest or sincere opinion, often used to preface a potentially candid or straightforward comment.

  • For example, someone might say, “TBH, I didn’t enjoy the movie as much as I thought I would.”
  • In a discussion about a person’s skills, a comment might be, “TBH, I think they need more practice.”
  • Another might say, “TBH, I’m not a fan of the new fashion trend.”

6. FWIW

This phrase is used to introduce a piece of information that may or may not be useful or relevant to the conversation. It’s a way for the speaker to provide their opinion or input without claiming it as a definitive fact.

  • For instance, “FWIW, I think the new restaurant in town is overrated.”
  • In a discussion about a movie, someone might say, “FWIW, I found the ending to be a bit confusing.”
  • A user might comment on a controversial topic, “FWIW, I believe everyone should have the right to choose.”

7. YMMV

This phrase is used to acknowledge that individual experiences and opinions may differ. It’s often used when giving advice or sharing personal experiences, to remind others that their own results may vary.

  • For example, “I tried that new diet and lost 10 pounds in a month, but YMMV.”
  • In a discussion about a product, someone might say, “I found the shampoo to be really effective, but YMMV.”
  • A user might share their experience with a workout routine, “I found the exercises to be challenging, but YMMV depending on your fitness level.”

8. NGL

This phrase is used to preface a statement that may be unexpected or contrary to what is typically expressed. It’s a way for the speaker to be honest and upfront about their opinion or admission.

  • For instance, “NGL, I didn’t enjoy the movie as much as I thought I would.”
  • In a discussion about a popular trend, someone might say, “NGL, I don’t understand the appeal.”
  • A user might admit to a guilty pleasure, “NGL, I secretly love reality TV shows.”

9. SMH

This acronym is used to express disapproval, disappointment, or disbelief. It’s often used in response to something that is considered foolish, ridiculous, or frustrating.

  • For example, “SMH, I can’t believe they canceled my favorite TV show.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial decision, someone might say, “SMH, they really dropped the ball on this one.”
  • A user might express annoyance at a repetitive argument, “SMH, can’t believe we’re still debating this.”

10. BTW

This phrase is used to introduce additional information or a side note that may not be directly related to the current topic of conversation. It’s a way to add something extra without derailing the main discussion.

  • For instance, “BTW, have you tried the new restaurant downtown?”
  • In a discussion about upcoming plans, someone might say, “BTW, I won’t be available next weekend.”
  • A user might share a helpful tip, “BTW, if you’re looking for a good book, I recommend this one.”

11. FYI

This acronym is used to share information or give a heads-up to someone. It is often used when providing someone with useful or interesting information.

  • For instance, “FYI, the meeting has been rescheduled to tomorrow.”
  • A person might say, “FYI, there’s a new restaurant opening in town next week.”
  • Another might use it in an email, “FYI, I’ve attached the updated report for your review.”

12. TBF

This acronym is used to acknowledge a different perspective or offer a counterpoint in a discussion. It is often used when someone wants to provide a fair assessment or give credit to a different viewpoint.

  • For example, “TBF, the other team played really well in the game.”
  • A person might say, “TBF, the movie had some impressive special effects.”
  • Another might use it in a comment, “TBF, the company did make some positive changes in response to feedback.”

13. IDK

This acronym is used when someone doesn’t have the answer to a question or is unsure about something. It is a quick and informal way of indicating a lack of knowledge.

  • For instance, “IDK the answer to that question, sorry.”
  • A person might say, “IDK if I’ll be able to make it to the party.”
  • Another might respond to a request, “IDK, I’ll have to check my schedule and get back to you.”

14. LMK

This acronym is used to ask someone to inform or update you on a particular matter. It is often used when requesting information or asking for a response.

  • For example, “LMK if you need any help with the project.”
  • A person might say, “LMK when you’re available to meet.”
  • Another might use it in a message, “LMK your thoughts on the proposal by tomorrow.”

15. RN

This acronym is used to indicate that something is happening or being done immediately. It is often used to emphasize the urgency or timeliness of a situation.

  • For instance, “I need to finish this report RN.”
  • A person might say, “I’m hungry. I need food RN.”
  • Another might use it in a text message, “I’ll be there RN, just give me a few minutes.”

16. WTH

An abbreviation for “What The Heck,” used to express surprise, disbelief, or confusion. It is a toned-down version of the more explicit phrase “What The Hell.”

  • For example, if someone tells you a shocking story, you might respond with, “WTH? I can’t believe that happened!”
  • In a chat conversation, someone might ask, “WTH is going on here? I’m so confused.”
  • A person might use this abbreviation to express frustration, saying, “WTH? Why won’t this computer work?”

17. OMG

An abbreviation for “Oh My God,” used to express astonishment, excitement, or disbelief. It is a popular phrase often used in online conversations and social media.

  • For instance, if someone shares an incredible news article, you might comment, “OMG! This is amazing!”
  • In a chat conversation, someone might exclaim, “OMG! I can’t believe you won the lottery!”
  • A person might use this abbreviation to express shock, saying, “OMG! I just saw a celebrity at the grocery store!”

18. LOL

An abbreviation for “Laugh Out Loud,” used to indicate that something is funny or amusing. It is commonly used in online conversations and social media.

  • For example, if someone tells a joke, you might respond with, “LOL! That’s hilarious!”
  • In a chat conversation, someone might type, “LOL! I can’t stop laughing at that meme.”
  • A person might use this abbreviation to express amusement, saying, “LOL! That video made my day!”

19. BRB

An abbreviation for “Be Right Back,” used to indicate a temporary absence or that the person will return shortly. It is commonly used in online conversations and text messages.

  • For instance, if someone needs to step away from the computer, they might say, “BRB, I need to grab a snack.”
  • In a chat conversation, someone might type, “BRB, I need to take a quick phone call.”
  • A person might use this abbreviation to let others know they’ll be back soon, saying, “BRB, just need to use the restroom.”

20. GTG

An abbreviation for “Got To Go,” used to indicate that the person needs to leave or end the conversation. It is commonly used in online conversations and text messages.

  • For example, if someone needs to leave a chat, they might say, “GTG, it was nice talking to you!”
  • In a text message, someone might type, “Running late for a meeting, GTG.”
  • A person might use this abbreviation to indicate they need to end the conversation, saying, “GTG, have a great day!”

21. ASAP

This acronym is used to indicate that something needs to be done quickly or urgently. It is often used in professional or business settings.

  • For instance, a boss might say, “I need that report ASAP.”
  • In a text message, someone might write, “Can you meet me for lunch ASAP?”
  • A coworker might ask, “Can you send me that file ASAP?”

22. TTYL

This acronym is used to indicate that the person will talk to the recipient at a later time. It is commonly used in casual conversations or text messages.

  • For example, at the end of a phone call, someone might say, “Alright, I’ll talk to you later. TTYL!”
  • In a text message, someone might write, “I have to go now. TTYL!”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you call me back later? TTYL!”

23. BFF

This acronym is used to refer to a person’s closest and most trusted friend. It is commonly used among teenagers and young adults.

  • For instance, someone might say, “She’s my BFF. We’ve known each other since kindergarten.”
  • In a social media post, someone might write, “Happy birthday to my BFF! Love you!”
  • Two friends might have a conversation like, “You’re my BFF. I can always count on you.”

24. BAE

This acronym is used to refer to a person’s romantic partner or significant other. It is often used in a loving or affectionate context.

  • For example, someone might write, “I love spending time with my bae.”
  • In a social media caption, someone might say, “Date night with bae ❤️.”
  • Two people in a relationship might have a conversation like, “You’re my bae. I can’t imagine my life without you.”

25. LMAO

This acronym is used to indicate that something is very funny. It is commonly used in online conversations, text messages, and social media.

  • For instance, someone might respond to a funny meme with, “LMAO, that’s hilarious!”
  • In a group chat, someone might write, “I just watched a funny video. LMAO!”
  • A friend might tell a funny joke and another friend might say, “LMAO, you always make me laugh!”

26. ROFL

This is an acronym used to indicate that something is extremely funny. It implies that the person is laughing so hard that they are rolling on the floor.

  • For example, “That joke was hilarious, I was ROFL!”
  • In response to a funny video, someone might comment, “ROFL, I can’t stop laughing!”
  • A person might say, “I watched a comedy special last night and was ROFL the entire time!”

27. JK

This abbreviation is used to indicate that the previous statement was not meant to be taken seriously. It is often used to clarify that the person was joking.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I heard they’re serving pizza for dinner tonight… JK!”
  • In a text message, a person might write, “You’re so gullible… JK!”
  • A friend might tease, “You really thought I won the lottery? JK, it was just a prank!”

28. TMI

This phrase is used when someone shares an excessive or inappropriate amount of personal information. It is often used to express discomfort or to indicate that the information was unnecessary.

  • For example, if someone shares details about their recent medical procedure, a person might respond, “TMI, I didn’t need to know that.”
  • In a conversation about relationships, someone might say, “My ex told me all about their new partner’s flaws… TMI!”
  • A person might comment on a social media post, “Do we really need to know about your bathroom habits? TMI!”

29. NSFW

This acronym is used to indicate that the content being shared is inappropriate or explicit and should not be viewed in a professional or public setting.

  • For instance, if a colleague sends a link to a video, they might include “NSFW” in the message to warn that it’s not suitable for the workplace.
  • In a discussion about internet etiquette, someone might advise, “Always label NSFW content to avoid awkward situations.”
  • A person might comment on a risqué meme, “Definitely NSFW, but it made me laugh!”

30. FOMO

This term describes the feeling of anxiety or unease that arises from the belief that others are having fun or experiencing something enjoyable without you. It is often used to describe the desire to participate in social activities or events.

  • For example, a person might say, “I didn’t go to the party last night and now I have a serious case of FOMO.”
  • In a group chat, someone might write, “Everyone is going to the concert tonight, and I have major FOMO.”
  • A person might express their FOMO on social media by posting, “Wish I could be at the beach right now, FOMO kicking in!”

31. IRL

Used to distinguish something that happens offline or in the physical world, as opposed to online or in a virtual setting.

  • For example, “I met my online friend IRL and we had a great time.”
  • A user might comment, “IRL interactions are often more meaningful than online ones.”
  • Another might say, “IRL events can sometimes be even more exciting than virtual ones.”

32. AF

An intensifier used to emphasize something to the extreme or convey a strong opinion or feeling.

  • For instance, “That movie was scary AF.”
  • A user might comment, “This food is delicious AF.”
  • Another might say, “I’m tired AF, I need a nap.”

33. HBU

Used to ask someone for their opinion or response after sharing your own.

  • For example, “I had a great day at work. HBU?”
  • A user might comment, “I’m craving pizza for dinner. HBU?”
  • Another might ask, “I’m thinking of going to the beach this weekend. HBU?”

34. ICYMI

Used to share something that others might have missed or overlooked.

  • For instance, “ICYMI, there’s a new episode of your favorite show tonight.”
  • A user might post, “ICYMI, the latest album from your favorite artist is now available.”
  • Another might say, “ICYMI, there’s a sale happening at your favorite store.”

35. TBT

A social media trend where users share nostalgic photos or memories on Thursdays.

  • For example, “Here’s a TBT photo of me from high school.”
  • A user might post, “TBT to that amazing vacation I took last year.”
  • Another might say, “TBT to when I used to play sports in college.”

36. FTFY

This acronym is used to indicate that someone has made a correction or improvement to a previous statement or piece of content. It is often used humorously or sarcastically.

  • For example, if someone says, “I’m going to the park to play some tenis,” someone might reply with “FTFY: tennis.”
  • In a discussion about grammar, someone might comment, “Your sentence is missing a comma. FTFY.”
  • A person might edit a photo and say, “The lighting was off, so I adjusted it. FTFY.”

37. IANAL

This acronym is used to indicate that the person speaking is not a legal expert or professional. It is often used when giving a non-expert opinion or advice.

  • For instance, if someone asks for legal advice on a forum, a user might reply with “IANAL, but I think you should consult a lawyer.”
  • In a conversation about a legal issue, someone might say, “IANAL, but it seems like a clear case of copyright infringement.”
  • A person might preface their statement with “IANAL,“IANAL, but based on my experience…”

38. NBD

This acronym is used to indicate that something is not significant or important. It is often used to downplay a situation or to reassure someone.

  • For example, if someone apologizes for a minor mistake, a person might say, “NBD, it happens to everyone.”
  • In a conversation about a small inconvenience, someone might comment, “NBD, I can easily fix it.”
  • A person might say, “I forgot to bring my wallet, but NBD, I can use Apple Pay.”

39. YOLO

This acronym is used to express the idea that life is short and should be lived to the fullest. It is often used to justify taking risks or doing something spontaneous.

  • For instance, if someone suggests doing something adventurous, a person might say, “Why not? YOLO!”
  • In a conversation about trying new experiences, someone might comment, “YOLO, might as well give it a shot.”
  • A person might use YOLO to explain their decision to quit their job and travel the world.
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40. WYD

This acronym is used to ask someone what they are currently doing or their plans. It is often used in casual conversations or text messages.

  • For example, if someone receives a message from a friend, they might reply with “WYD?”
  • In a conversation about weekend plans, someone might ask, “WYD on Saturday?”
  • A person might use WYD to start a conversation and ask, “Hey, WYD this evening?”

41. AMA

AMA is an abbreviation for “Ask Me Anything.” It is used to invite others to ask questions about a specific topic or experience. This slang term is commonly used on social media platforms and forums.

  • For example, someone might post, “AMA about my experience traveling the world.”
  • A celebrity might say, “I’m doing an AMA to promote my new album. Ask me anything about the songs!”
  • A user might ask, “AMA about my job as a firefighter.”

42. TIL

TIL stands for “Today I Learned.” It is used to share interesting or surprising facts or information that the user has recently learned. This slang term is often used in online communities to spark discussion or provide educational content.

  • For instance, someone might post, “TIL that the Eiffel Tower was originally intended to be a temporary structure.”
  • Another user might share, “TIL that the Great Wall of China is not visible from space.”
  • A person might comment, “TIL that the average person walks the equivalent of three times around the world in a lifetime.”

43. TL;DR

TL;DR is an abbreviation for “Too Long; Didn’t Read.” It is used to summarize a lengthy piece of text or information in a concise manner. This slang term is often used to provide a quick overview for those who don’t have the time or interest to read the full content.

  • For example, someone might write, “TL;DR: The article discusses the impact of climate change on polar bears.”
  • A user might comment, “TL;DR version: The movie is about a group of friends who go on a road trip.”
  • Another person might say, “TL;DR: The study found that exercise can improve mental health.”

44. NVM

NVM is an abbreviation for “Never Mind.” It is used to indicate that the user no longer wants to continue or discuss a particular topic. This slang term is often used in casual conversations or online chats.

  • For instance, someone might write, “I just found the answer. NVM!”
  • A user might comment, “I thought I left my keys at home, but they were in my bag. NVM.”
  • Another person might say, “NVM, I figured it out on my own.”

45. IMK

IMK is an abbreviation for “In My Knowledge.” It is used to preface a statement or opinion with the understanding that it is based on the user’s personal knowledge or understanding. This slang term is often used in online discussions or forums.

  • For example, someone might write, “IMK, the best way to cook pasta is to add salt to the boiling water.”
  • A user might comment, “IMK, the company is planning to release a new product next month.”
  • Another person might say, “IMK, the movie is based on a true story.”

46. AYOR

This phrase is used to indicate that something is potentially dangerous or risky, and individuals should proceed with caution or take responsibility for the consequences. It is often used in online discussions or when giving advice.

  • For example, a user might comment, “I’ve heard mixed reviews about that restaurant, so try it AYOR.”
  • In a discussion about extreme sports, someone might say, “Skydiving is an incredible experience, but it’s definitely AYOR.”
  • A person giving relationship advice might warn, “Getting back together with an ex is always AYOR.”

47. AYK

This acronym is used to express surprise or disbelief. It is often used in response to a statement or situation that seems unbelievable or absurd.

  • For instance, someone might comment, “AYK? That can’t be true!”
  • In a conversation about a strange news article, a person might say, “AYK? This story is too bizarre to be real.”
  • A user might respond to a friend’s outrageous claim with, “AYK? You’ve got to be joking!”

48. Per

This word is used as a shorthand way of indicating that information or a statement is based on a specific source or authority. It is often used in formal or legal contexts.

  • For example, a news article might state, “Per the latest report, the economy is improving.”
  • In a business meeting, someone might say, “Per the CEO’s instructions, we need to increase sales.”
  • A lawyer might argue, “Per the contract, the defendant is obligated to pay.”

49. As per

This phrase is used to indicate that something is being done or will be done according to a specific rule, instruction, or agreement.

  • For instance, a supervisor might say, “As per company policy, all employees must attend the training.”
  • In a contract, a clause might state, “The tenant is responsible for repairs as per the rental agreement.”
  • A teacher might remind students, “As per the syllabus, the final exam will cover all the material we’ve studied.”

50. According to the grapevine

This phrase is used to indicate that information or news is not confirmed or verified, but rather comes from unofficial sources or gossip.

  • For example, a person might say, “According to the grapevine, there will be major changes in the company.”
  • In a discussion about a celebrity’s relationship, someone might comment, “According to the grapevine, they’ve broken up.”
  • A friend might share some interesting news by saying, “According to the grapevine, there’s going to be a surprise party for you.”

51. According to the word on the street

This phrase is used to indicate that the following information is based on gossip or informal sources of information. It suggests that the information may not be completely reliable.

  • For example, “According to the word on the street, he’s planning to quit his job.”
  • In a discussion about a local event, someone might say, “According to the word on the street, the concert was amazing.”
  • A friend might share, “According to the word on the street, they broke up last night.”

52. According to the book

This phrase is used to suggest that something is being done exactly as it should be, following established guidelines or procedures.

  • For instance, “According to the book, you should turn off all electronic devices during takeoff and landing.”
  • In a discussion about cooking, someone might say, “According to the book, you should let the steak rest for a few minutes before cutting.”
  • A teacher might remind their students, “According to the book, you need to cite your sources in your research paper.”

53. According to the powers that be

This phrase is used to refer to the people in authority or those who hold power. It suggests that the following information or decision is based on the opinions or directives of those in charge.

  • For example, “According to the powers that be, we need to work overtime this week.”
  • In a discussion about company policies, someone might say, “According to the powers that be, we’re implementing a new dress code.”
  • A colleague might mention, “According to the powers that be, the project deadline has been moved up.”

54. According to popular opinion

This phrase is used to indicate that the following information or belief is based on what is commonly accepted or believed by the majority of people.

  • For instance, “According to popular opinion, this restaurant serves the best pizza in town.”
  • In a debate about a controversial topic, someone might argue, “According to popular opinion, this policy should be changed.”
  • A friend might say, “According to popular opinion, this movie is a must-see.”

55. According to the experts

This phrase is used to suggest that the following information or advice is based on the knowledge and expertise of professionals or specialists in a particular field.

  • For example, “According to the experts, regular exercise is essential for maintaining good health.”
  • In a discussion about nutrition, someone might say, “According to the experts, a balanced diet should include a variety of fruits and vegetables.”
  • A fitness trainer might advise, “According to the experts, it’s important to warm up before starting any intense workout.”

56. According to reliable sources

This phrase is used to indicate that the information being presented comes from credible and reliable sources.

  • For example, a news article might state, “According to reliable sources, the company is planning to launch a new product next month.”
  • During a discussion, someone might say, “According to reliable sources, the team is considering a trade for a star player.”
  • A journalist might write, “According to reliable sources, the government is planning to implement new policies to address the issue.”

57. According to my sources

This phrase is used to indicate that the information being shared comes from the speaker’s own sources, which may or may not be reliable or credible.

  • For instance, someone might say, “According to my sources, there will be a surprise guest at the event.”
  • During a conversation, a person might mention, “According to my sources, the company is going through a major restructuring.”
  • A gossip blog might claim, “According to our sources, the celebrity couple is getting a divorce.”

58. According to legend

This phrase is used to introduce information or a statement that is based on a well-known story or belief, often one that has been passed down through generations.

  • For example, a tour guide might say, “According to legend, this ancient castle is haunted by the ghost of a princess.”
  • During a discussion about mythical creatures, someone might mention, “According to legend, dragons were known to hoard treasures.”
  • A historian might write, “According to legend, this sword was pulled from a stone by a true king.”

59. According to tradition

This phrase is used to indicate that something is done or believed in a certain way because it is part of a long-standing tradition.

  • For instance, during a holiday celebration, someone might say, “According to tradition, we exchange gifts on Christmas Eve.”
  • In a cultural context, a person might mention, “According to tradition, brides wear white wedding dresses.”
  • A historian might explain, “According to tradition, this ancient ritual has been performed for centuries.”

60. According to the script

This phrase is used to indicate that something is happening or being done as directed by the script of a play or movie.

  • For example, a theater director might say, “According to the script, the character enters from stage left.”
  • During a discussion about a film adaptation, someone might mention, “According to the script, this scene takes place in a coffee shop.”
  • A film critic might write, “According to the script, the main character’s dialogue provides insight into their inner thoughts.”

61. According to the research

This phrase is used to attribute information or conclusions to a specific research or study.

  • For example, “According to the research, eating a balanced diet can improve overall health.”
  • In a scientific discussion, someone might say, “According to the research, the experiment yielded statistically significant results.”
  • A news article might state, “According to the research, climate change is causing an increase in extreme weather events.”

62. According to the theory

When something is said to be “according to the theory,” it means it aligns with a specific hypothesis or set of principles.

  • For instance, “According to the theory of relativity, time dilation occurs near massive objects.”
  • In a physics lecture, a professor might explain, “According to the theory, the expansion of the universe is accelerating.”
  • A book on psychology might state, “According to the theory, dreams are a manifestation of unconscious desires.”

63. According to the timeline

When something is said to be “according to the timeline,” it means it adheres to a specific chronological sequence or schedule.

  • For example, “According to the timeline, the construction of the building will be completed by next year.”
  • In a project meeting, someone might say, “According to the timeline, we should finish this phase by the end of the month.”
  • A historical documentary might state, “According to the timeline, the Renaissance period lasted from the 14th to the 17th century.”

64. According to the plan

When something is said to be “according to the plan,” it means it aligns with a predetermined strategy or course of action.

  • For instance, “According to the plan, we will launch the new product next month.”
  • In a business meeting, someone might say, “According to the plan, we should focus on expanding our customer base.”
  • A military briefing might state, “According to the plan, the troops will advance from the east.”

65. According to the rules

When something is said to be “according to the rules,” it means it adheres to a specific set of regulations or guidelines.

  • For example, “According to the rules, players must wear protective gear during the game.”
  • In a board game, someone might say, “According to the rules, each player takes turns rolling the dice.”
  • A company policy might state, “According to the rules, employees must submit expense reports within two weeks.”

66. According to the norm

This phrase is used to indicate that something is in accordance with the commonly accepted or expected standard.

  • For example, “According to the norm, students are expected to complete their assignments on time.”
  • In a discussion about social behavior, someone might say, “According to the norm, it’s considered impolite to interrupt someone while they’re speaking.”
  • A person might express their frustration by saying, “According to the norm, I should have received a response by now, but I haven’t heard anything.”

67. ETA

This acronym is used to indicate the expected time of arrival for a person or an object.

  • For instance, someone might text their friend, “I’m on my way. ETA 10 minutes.”
  • In a travel forum, a user might ask, “What’s the ETA for the next bus to downtown?”
  • A delivery driver might inform a customer, “Your package is out for delivery. ETA is between 2-4 pm.”

68. OOTD

This acronym is used to showcase and share one’s daily outfit on social media platforms.

  • For example, a user might post a photo on Instagram with the caption, “OOTD: Loving this new dress!”
  • In a fashion blog, someone might write, “Check out my OOTD featuring this season’s hottest trends.”
  • A person might comment on a friend’s post by saying, “Looking great! I love your OOTD.”

69. ILY

This acronym is used as a shorthand way of expressing love or affection towards someone.

  • For instance, someone might text their partner, “ILY, you mean the world to me.”
  • In a heartfelt message to a friend, a person might write, “Just wanted to say ILY and appreciate our friendship.”
  • A parent might leave a note for their child, saying, “ILY, have a great day at school!”