Top 26 Slang For Accused – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to discussing legal matters, understanding the slang and terminology can be crucial. In this article, we’ve gathered a list of the most common slang terms used for the accused. Whether you’re a law student, a true crime aficionado, or just curious about legal lingo, we’ve got you covered. Let’s unravel the mysteries behind the language surrounding the accused and dive into the world of criminal justice together.

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1. Suspect

A suspect is someone who is believed to have committed a crime or is involved in a criminal investigation. This term is commonly used by law enforcement and in legal proceedings.

  • For example, “The police have identified a suspect in the robbery.”
  • A news report might state, “The suspect is considered armed and dangerous.”
  • In a courtroom, a lawyer might ask a witness, “Did you see the suspect at the scene of the crime?”

2. Perp

Short for “perpetrator,” this slang term refers to an individual who is responsible for committing a crime or wrongdoing. It is often used informally in conversations or in media.

  • For instance, a detective might say, “We’re still looking for the perp who stole the car.”
  • In a crime TV show, a character might ask, “Did they catch the perp?”
  • A news headline might read, “Police apprehend perp in downtown shooting.”

3. Defendant

In legal terms, a defendant is a person who is formally charged with a crime and is required to defend themselves in court. This term is commonly used in the context of criminal trials and legal proceedings.

  • For example, “The defendant pleaded not guilty to the charges.”
  • A lawyer might argue, “The defendant maintains their innocence.”
  • In a courtroom, the judge might address the defendant, saying, “You have the right to remain silent.”

4. Culprit

The term “culprit” refers to the person who is responsible for committing a crime or wrongdoing. It is often used in a casual or informal manner to identify the individual at fault.

  • For instance, a parent might say to their child, “You’re the culprit who ate all the cookies.”
  • In a detective novel, a character might exclaim, “I’ve finally figured out the culprit!”
  • A news report might state, “The police have apprehended the culprit behind the series of burglaries.”

5. Offender

An offender is someone who has violated the law or committed a crime. This term is commonly used in legal and criminal justice contexts to describe individuals who have engaged in unlawful behavior.

  • For example, “The offender was sentenced to five years in prison.”
  • A police officer might refer to a person they have arrested as an offender, saying, “We’ve got the offender in custody.”
  • In a court document, the term “offender” might be used to describe the accused party.

6. Alleged

This term is used to describe someone who is accused of a crime but has not been proven guilty in a court of law. It implies that the person is only accused and their guilt has not been established.

  • For example, “The alleged thief was caught on surveillance cameras.”
  • In a news report, it might be stated, “The alleged murderer is still at large.”
  • A lawyer might argue, “My client is innocent until proven guilty, as he is only the alleged perpetrator.”

7. Guilty party

This term refers to the person who is responsible for committing a crime or wrongdoing. It implies that the person has been found guilty or is believed to be responsible for the offense.

  • For instance, “The guilty party was sentenced to five years in prison.”
  • In a court case, the prosecutor might say, “We have evidence that points to the guilty party.”
  • A detective might say, “Our investigation led us to the guilty party.”

8. Accused party

This term is used to describe the person who is formally charged with a crime and is required to defend themselves in a court of law. It implies that the person is the accused party in a legal proceeding.

  • For example, “The accused party pleaded not guilty to the charges.”
  • In a trial, the defense attorney might say, “Ladies and gentlemen of the jury, my client, the accused party, is innocent.”
  • A news headline might read, “The accused party’s trial begins today.”

9. Wrongdoer

This term refers to someone who has committed a wrongful act or offense. It implies that the person has done something morally or legally wrong.

  • For instance, “The wrongdoer was caught stealing from the store.”
  • In a police report, it might state, “The offender was charged with assault.”
  • A victim might say, “I hope the wrongdoer is brought to justice.”

10. Lawbreaker

This term is used to describe someone who has violated the law or committed a crime. It implies that the person has knowingly and intentionally broken the law.

  • For example, “The lawbreaker was apprehended by the police.”
  • In a court case, a prosecutor might say, “The evidence clearly shows that the defendant is a lawbreaker.”
  • A news article might state, “The criminal’s history of being a lawbreaker was presented in court.”

11. Perpetrator

This term refers to someone who has committed a crime or carried out an illegal act. It is often used to describe the person responsible for an offense or wrongdoing.

  • For example, a news headline might read, “Police are searching for the perpetrator of the robbery.”
  • In a courtroom, a lawyer might refer to the accused as the perpetrator of the crime.
  • A witness might testify, “I saw the perpetrator fleeing the scene of the crime.”

12. Miscreant

This word is used to describe someone who behaves badly or breaks the law. It carries a negative connotation and is often used to emphasize the person’s immoral or unethical actions.

  • For instance, a parent might scold their child, saying, “Stop acting like a miscreant!”
  • In a news report, a journalist might describe a criminal as a miscreant.
  • A person might say, “That miscreant should be held accountable for their actions.”

13. Con

This slang term is short for “convict” and refers to someone who has been found guilty of a crime and sentenced to prison. It is often used to describe a person with a criminal record.

  • For example, a person might say, “He’s a con who just got released from prison.”
  • In a discussion about rehabilitation, someone might ask, “What programs are available to help cons reintegrate into society?”
  • A news article might report, “The con was apprehended after attempting to escape from custody.”

14. Crook

This slang term is used to describe someone who is dishonest or engages in illegal activities, particularly theft or fraud. It is often used to refer to a person involved in criminal behavior.

  • For instance, a person might say, “Watch out for that crook. He’s known for pickpocketing.”
  • In a detective novel, the protagonist might be on the trail of a notorious crook.
  • A police officer might say, “We caught the crook red-handed.”

15. Suspected

This word is used to describe someone who is believed to have committed a crime but has not yet been proven guilty. It indicates that there is suspicion or doubt surrounding the person’s involvement in the offense.

  • For example, a news report might state, “The suspected bank robber is still at large.”
  • In a courtroom, a lawyer might refer to the accused as the suspected perpetrator.
  • A person might say, “The police are questioning several individuals as potential suspects in the case.”

16. Malefactor

This term refers to someone who has committed a crime or done something morally wrong. It is often used in a formal or legal context.

  • For example, a news article might describe a convicted criminal as a “notorious malefactor.”
  • In a courtroom, a lawyer might refer to the defendant as the “alleged malefactor.”
  • A person discussing crime rates might say, “We need stricter punishments for these malefactors.”

17. Delinquent

This term is commonly used to describe someone who has committed a minor crime or violated a rule or law. It is often associated with juveniles or young people.

  • For instance, a teacher might refer to a student who consistently breaks the rules as a “delinquent.”
  • In a discussion about crime prevention, someone might say, “We need to address the root causes of delinquency.”
  • A parent might express concern about their child’s behavior by saying, “I’m worried my son is becoming a delinquent.”

18. Accused

This term refers to someone who has been formally charged with a crime or wrongdoing. It is often used in a legal context to describe the person who is being accused.

  • For example, a news headline might read, “Accused murderer pleads not guilty.”
  • In a courtroom, the judge might address the accused by saying, “How do you plead?”
  • A lawyer might refer to their client as the “defendant” or “accused” during a trial.
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19. Law offender

This term is used to describe someone who has violated a law or committed a crime. It emphasizes the act of breaking the law.

  • For instance, a police officer might refer to someone they have arrested as a “law offender.”
  • In a discussion about crime rates, someone might say, “We need to crack down on these lawbreakers.”
  • A person advocating for stricter penalties might argue, “Repeat law offenders should face harsher punishments.”

20. Jailbird

This term is slang for someone who has been convicted of a crime and spent time in jail. It is often used in a lighthearted or informal way.

  • For example, a person might jokingly refer to a friend who has been to jail as a “jailbird.”
  • In a conversation about personal experiences, someone might say, “I was a jailbird for a night after a minor offense.”
  • A person discussing rehabilitation might say, “We need better programs to help jailbirds reintegrate into society.”

21. Outlaw

An outlaw is someone who has committed a serious crime and is on the run from the law. The term is often associated with historical figures who operated outside of the law, such as cowboys or bandits.

  • For example, “Billy the Kid was a notorious outlaw in the Old West.”
  • In a discussion about crime, someone might say, “Being an outlaw was a dangerous and risky lifestyle.”
  • A fan of Western movies might comment, “Outlaw characters are often portrayed as antiheroes, fighting against corrupt systems.”

22. Convict

A convict is a person who has been found guilty of a crime and sentenced to serve time in prison. It is a more formal term used to describe someone who has been convicted of a criminal offense.

  • For instance, “The judge sentenced the convict to ten years in prison.”
  • In a conversation about the justice system, someone might say, “The number of convicts in overcrowded prisons is a major issue.”
  • A news article might report, “The convict was released on parole after serving five years of a ten-year sentence.”

23. Felon

A felon is a person who has been convicted of a serious crime, typically carrying a sentence of more than one year in prison. It is a legal term used to describe individuals who have committed a felony offense.

  • For example, “He became a felon after being found guilty of armed robbery.”
  • In a discussion about criminal records, someone might ask, “Do felons have difficulties finding employment?”
  • A person advocating for criminal justice reform might argue, “We need to provide more support and resources for felons after they serve their sentences.”

24. Criminal

A criminal is someone who has committed a crime, regardless of the severity. It is a broad term that encompasses individuals involved in various illegal activities.

  • For instance, “The police arrested the criminal for theft.”
  • In a conversation about crime rates, someone might say, “Society needs to address the root causes that lead people to become criminals.”
  • A news headline might read, “New measures aim to reduce criminal activity in the city.”

25. Alleged offender

An alleged offender is someone who is accused of committing a crime but has not yet been proven guilty in a court of law. The term “alleged” indicates that the person’s involvement in the crime is still under investigation or subject to legal proceedings.

  • For example, “The alleged offender is awaiting trial.”
  • In a discussion about the presumption of innocence, someone might say, “We must remember that alleged offenders are innocent until proven guilty.”
  • A news report might state, “Police have identified the alleged offender based on eyewitness accounts.”

26. Alleged perpetrator

This term refers to someone who is accused of committing a crime but has not yet been proven guilty. It is used to emphasize that the person is only alleged to be the perpetrator and their guilt has not been established.

  • For instance, in a news report, the anchor might say, “The alleged perpetrator of the robbery is still at large.”
  • In a court case, the defense attorney might argue, “There is no concrete evidence linking my client to the crime. He is merely an alleged perpetrator.”
  • A journalist might write, “The police have released a composite sketch of the alleged perpetrator and are asking for the public’s help in identifying him.”