Top 71 Slang For Acknowledge – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to acknowledging someone or something, sometimes a simple “yes” or “okay” just doesn’t cut it. Luckily, we’ve got your back. Our team has scoured the depths of the English language to bring you a list of the top slang words and phrases for acknowledge. Whether you want to sound cool or just add some variety to your everyday conversations, this listicle is here to help you up your acknowledge game. Get ready to impress your friends and expand your vocabulary with these trendy expressions!

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1. Aye

A simple and informal way to acknowledge or agree with someone. It is often used in a military or nautical context.

  • For example, a captain might say, “Aye, aye!” to indicate they have understood and will follow the order.
  • In a conversation, one person might say, “Aye, I’ll be there on time.”
  • A group of friends deciding on a plan might say, “Aye, let’s go to the movies tonight.”

2. Gotcha

A casual way to acknowledge that you have understood or comprehended something.

  • For instance, if someone explains a concept to you, you might respond with “Gotcha!”
  • During a conversation, one person might say, “I’ll pick up the groceries on my way home.” The other person might reply, “Gotcha, thanks!”
  • When receiving instructions, you might say, “I gotcha, I’ll make sure to follow through.”

3. Roger that

A phrase used to acknowledge that a message or instruction has been received and understood. It is commonly used in radio communications and military contexts.

  • For example, a pilot might say, “Roger that” to confirm they have received instructions from air traffic control.
  • In a team setting, one person might say, “We need to finish the report by tomorrow.” Another person might respond, “Roger that, I’ll prioritize it.”
  • During a mission, a soldier might radio in, “Enemy spotted, requesting backup.” The response might be, “Roger that, support is on the way.”

4. Copy that

A phrase used to acknowledge that a message or instruction has been heard and understood. It is often used in radio communications and military contexts.

  • For instance, a dispatcher might say, “The suspect is heading east, copy that?” The officer might respond, “Copy that, I’m in pursuit.”
  • In a work setting, a colleague might say, “We need to reschedule the meeting.” Another colleague might reply, “Copy that, I’ll inform everyone.”
  • During a training exercise, an instructor might give directions and ask, “Copy that?” The trainees would respond, “Copy that, understood.”

5. Affirmative

A formal way to acknowledge or confirm something, often used in professional or formal settings.

  • For example, during a business meeting, one person might say, “We have approval from the board, affirmative?” Another person might respond, “Affirmative, we can proceed.”
  • In a military context, a commanding officer might give an order and ask, “Do you understand?” The response might be, “Affirmative, sir!”
  • When confirming a reservation over the phone, a customer service representative might ask, “Can I confirm your booking?” The customer might reply, “Affirmative, that’s correct.”

6. Yup

A casual and informal way to acknowledge or agree with someone. It is often used in a laid-back or nonchalant manner.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Do you want to grab dinner tonight?” you might respond with, “Yup, sounds good.”
  • In a conversation, one person might say, “Yup, I totally understand what you’re saying.”
  • Another might use it to show agreement, saying, “Yup, I agree with you on that point.”

7. Roger

Derived from the radio communication code used by the military and aviation, “Roger” is used to acknowledge that a message has been received and understood.

  • For instance, if someone gives instructions, you might respond with, “Roger that, I’ll get it done.”
  • In a team meeting, someone might say, “Roger, I’ll take care of that task.”
  • Another person might use it to confirm understanding, saying, “Roger, I know what needs to be done.”

8. Copy

A term derived from radio communication, “Copy” is used to indicate that a message has been received and understood.

  • For example, if someone gives directions, you might respond with, “Copy that, I’ll follow the instructions.”
  • In a conversation, one person might say, “Copy, I got it.”
  • Another might use it to confirm understanding, saying, “Copy, I know what you’re asking for.”

9. Understood

A straightforward way to indicate that a message has been received and fully understood.

  • For instance, if someone gives an explanation, you might respond with, “Understood, thank you for clarifying.”
  • In a meeting, one person might say, “Understood, I’ll make the necessary changes.”
  • Another might use it to confirm understanding, saying, “Understood, I’ll take that into consideration.”

10. I hear you

This phrase is used to convey that you have heard and comprehended someone’s message or point of view.

  • For example, if someone expresses their concerns, you might respond with, “I hear you, and I understand why you feel that way.”
  • In a discussion, one person might say, “I hear you, and I agree with your perspective.”
  • Another might use it to show empathy, saying, “I hear you, and I’m here to support you.”

11. I see

This phrase is used to indicate that you have understood or comprehended something.

  • For example, if someone explains a concept to you, you can respond with “I see” to show that you have grasped the idea.
  • In a conversation, one person might say, “So, you just need to press this button,” and the other person might reply, “Ah, I see.”
  • If someone points out a detail to you, you can acknowledge it by saying, “Oh, I see what you mean now.”

12. Alright

This word is used to express agreement or acceptance of a situation or information.

  • For instance, if someone asks if you’re ready to leave, you can respond with “Alright” to indicate that you are.
  • In a discussion, one person might say, “We need to finish this project by tomorrow,” and the other person might reply, “Alright, let’s get to work.”
  • If someone suggests a plan, you can acknowledge it by saying, “Alright, that sounds like a good idea.”

13. OK

This term is used to indicate approval or acknowledgement of something.

  • For example, if someone asks if you’re available for a meeting, you can respond with “OK” to indicate that you are.
  • In a conversation, one person might say, “I’ll meet you at the restaurant at 7,” and the other person might reply, “OK, see you there.”
  • If someone suggests a solution to a problem, you can acknowledge it by saying, “OK, let’s give it a try.”

14. Sure thing

This phrase is used to express confirmation or acceptance of a request or statement.

  • For instance, if someone asks if you can help them with a task, you can respond with “Sure thing” to indicate that you will.
  • In a conversation, one person might say, “Could you pass me the salt, please?” and the other person might reply, “Sure thing, here you go.”
  • If someone suggests a meeting time, you can acknowledge it by saying, “Sure thing, that works for me.”

15. No problem

This phrase is used to respond to a request or statement in a way that indicates it was not a burden or inconvenience.

  • For example, if someone thanks you for doing something, you can respond with “No problem” to indicate that it was easy or not a big deal.
  • In a conversation, one person might say, “I’m sorry for the delay,” and the other person might reply, “No problem, I understand.”
  • If someone asks if you can complete a task, you can acknowledge it by saying, “No problem, I can take care of that for you.”

16. All good

This phrase is used to acknowledge a request or statement and indicate that there is no issue or problem with it. It is often used to assure someone that everything is fine.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Can you finish the report by tomorrow?”, you can respond with, “All good, I’ll have it done.”
  • In a conversation about meeting up with friends, one person might say, “I’ll be a bit late,” and the other can reply, “All good, take your time.”
  • If someone apologizes for a mistake, you can say, “Don’t worry about it, all good.”

17. You bet

This phrase is used to express agreement or affirmation. It is a casual way of acknowledging something and indicating that you are confident in the statement or request.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Can you help me with this?”, you can respond with, “You bet, I’ll be there.”
  • In a conversation about going to a party, one person might say, “It’s going to be fun,” and the other can reply, “You bet it will be.”
  • If someone thanks you for a favor, you can say, “You bet, anytime.”

18. Absolutely

This word is used to strongly agree or acknowledge something without any doubt. It is a more formal way of expressing agreement or affirmation.

  • For example, if someone suggests, “We should go on a road trip,” you can respond with, “Absolutely, that sounds like a great idea.”
  • In a discussion about a plan, one person might say, “We need to finish this project by Friday,” and the other can reply, “Absolutely, let’s get to work.”
  • If someone asks for your opinion, you can say, “Absolutely, I think it’s the best option.”

19. Indeed

This word is used to acknowledge a statement or confirm that something is true. It is a more formal way of expressing agreement or affirmation.

  • For instance, if someone says, “It’s a beautiful day,” you can respond with, “Indeed, the weather is perfect.”
  • In a conversation about a recent event, one person might say, “The concert was amazing,” and the other can reply, “Indeed, it was a memorable experience.”
  • If someone states a fact, you can say, “Indeed, that’s how it happened.”

20. Affirm

This word is used to acknowledge or confirm a statement or request. It is a more formal way of expressing agreement or affirmation.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Can you attend the meeting?”, you can respond with, “I affirm, I’ll be there.”
  • In a discussion about a decision, one person might say, “We should proceed with the plan,” and the other can reply, “I affirm, let’s move forward.”
  • If someone presents an idea, you can say, “I affirm, that’s a good suggestion.”

21. Ack

This is a shortened form of the word “acknowledge” and is often used in informal or casual conversations to indicate understanding or agreement.

  • For example, someone might say, “Ack, got it!” to show that they understand a message or instruction.
  • In a group chat, a person might respond with “Ack” to indicate that they have seen a message.
  • A person might say, “I ack your point, but I still disagree” to acknowledge someone’s perspective while expressing a different opinion.
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22. I got it

This phrase is used to indicate that one has understood or comprehended something.

  • For instance, if someone explains a concept, another person might say, “I got it, thanks for explaining!”
  • In a team meeting, a member might say, “I got it, I’ll take care of that task” to show that they understand the assigned responsibility.
  • If someone gives directions, a person might respond with, “I got it, I know where to go.”

23. I’m with you

This phrase is used to show that one not only understands but also agrees with someone’s point of view or idea.

  • For example, during a discussion, one person might say, “I’m with you on that, we should definitely pursue that strategy.”
  • In a team meeting, a member might say, “I’m with you, let’s go ahead with the proposed changes.”
  • If someone suggests a plan of action, another person might say, “I’m with you, let’s give it a try.”

24. I’m on it

This phrase is used to indicate that one will handle a task or responsibility.

  • For instance, if someone asks for assistance, another person might respond with, “I’m on it, I’ll help you right away.”
  • In a work setting, a colleague might say, “I’m on it, I’ll complete the report by the end of the day.”
  • If someone assigns a task, a person might say, “I’m on it, I’ll make sure it gets done.”

25. I’m on the same page

This phrase is used to express agreement or alignment with someone else’s thoughts or ideas.

  • For example, during a discussion, one person might say, “I’m glad we’re on the same page about this issue.”
  • In a team meeting, a member might say, “I think we’re all on the same page regarding the project timeline.”
  • If someone proposes a plan, another person might say, “I’m on the same page, let’s move forward with it.”

26. I’m tracking

This phrase means that the person understands or comprehends what is being said or explained.

  • For example, if someone gives instructions, a person might respond, “I’m tracking, I got it.”
  • In a work setting, a colleague might say, “Just to make sure I’m tracking, we need to finish this project by Friday.”
  • During a conversation, someone might say, “I’m tracking your point, let’s move on.”

27. I’m picking up what you’re putting down

This expression indicates that the person not only understands what is being communicated but also agrees with it.

  • For instance, if someone shares an idea, another person might respond, “I’m picking up what you’re putting down, that’s a great suggestion.”
  • During a discussion, someone might say, “I’m picking up what you’re putting down, let’s implement that strategy.”
  • In a casual conversation, a friend might say, “I’m picking up what you’re putting down, let’s go grab dinner.”

28. I’m hip

This phrase means that the person not only understands what is being said but is also knowledgeable or familiar with the subject.

  • For example, if someone explains a concept, a person might respond, “I’m hip, I knew that already.”
  • During a conversation about a popular trend, someone might say, “I’m hip, I’ve been following that for a while.”
  • In a discussion about a specific topic, a colleague might say, “I’m hip, I’ve done extensive research on that subject.”

29. I’m in the loop

This expression indicates that the person is aware of the current situation or information and is included in the communication or decision-making process.

  • For instance, if someone mentions a recent development, a person might respond, “I’m in the loop, I heard about that.”
  • During a team meeting, a member might say, “I’m in the loop, I attended the previous discussion.”
  • In a professional setting, a colleague might say, “I’m in the loop, I’ve been receiving regular updates.”

30. I’m in agreement

This phrase simply means that the person agrees with what has been said or proposed.

  • For example, if someone suggests a plan, a person might respond, “I’m in agreement, let’s proceed.”
  • During a group discussion, someone might say, “I’m in agreement with what you just said.”
  • In a conversation about a decision, a friend might say, “I’m in agreement, that sounds like the best option.”

31. I’m in the know

This phrase is used to indicate that the speaker is aware of or informed about a certain topic or situation.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Do you know what’s happening with the project?” a response could be, “Yes, I’m in the know.”
  • In a conversation about current events, a person might say, “I read the news every day, so I’m always in the know.”
  • Someone might use this phrase to assert their expertise by saying, “As a doctor, I’m in the know about the latest medical research.”

32. I’m in sync

This phrase is used to express that the speaker is in alignment or agreement with another person or a situation.

  • For instance, if two colleagues have the same idea during a meeting, one might say, “Great minds think alike. I’m in sync with you.”
  • In a conversation about plans, a person might say, “I’m in sync with the schedule. Let’s proceed as planned.”
  • Someone might use this phrase to indicate that they understand and are on the same page by saying, “I’ve read the instructions and I’m in sync with the process.”

33. I’m in tune

This phrase is used to convey that the speaker has a good understanding or awareness of a particular subject or situation.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Do you understand the concept?” a response could be, “Yes, I’m in tune with it.”
  • In a discussion about emotions, a person might say, “I’m in tune with my feelings, so I know when something is bothering me.”
  • Someone might use this phrase to indicate their ability to adapt and understand by saying, “I’m in tune with the changes happening in the industry.”

34. I’m in touch

This phrase is used to express that the speaker is in communication or contact with a person or a source of information.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Have you spoken to John recently?” a response could be, “Yes, I’m in touch with him.”
  • In a conversation about a mutual acquaintance, a person might say, “I’m in touch with Sarah, so I can ask her for more details.”
  • Someone might use this phrase to indicate their access to information by saying, “I’m in touch with the latest updates on the project.”

35. I’m in line

This phrase is used to indicate that the speaker is following or adhering to a certain plan, rule, or expectation.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Are you following the guidelines?” a response could be, “Yes, I’m in line with them.”
  • In a discussion about priorities, a person might say, “I’m in line with the company’s goals, so I’ll focus on those tasks.”
  • Someone might use this phrase to assure compliance by saying, “Don’t worry, I’m in line with the rules and regulations.”

36. I’m in the picture

This phrase is used to indicate that one understands or comprehends a situation or concept. It suggests being aware of the current circumstances or being on the same page as others.

  • For example, if someone explains a complicated plan and asks if you understand, you can respond, “Don’t worry, I’m in the picture.”
  • In a team meeting, if someone presents a new strategy and asks for feedback, you can say, “I’m in the picture and think it’s a great idea.”
  • When discussing a complex topic with a friend, you can say, “After reading that article, I finally feel like I’m in the picture.”

37. I’m in accord

This phrase is used to express agreement or alignment with someone else’s opinion or viewpoint. It suggests being in harmony or on the same page.

  • For instance, during a group discussion, if someone proposes a solution and asks for agreement, you can respond, “I’m in accord with your suggestion.”
  • In a debate, if someone presents a compelling argument and asks for support, you can say, “I’m in accord with their reasoning.”
  • When discussing future plans with a partner, you can say, “I’m in accord with your goals and aspirations.”

38. I’m in harmony

This phrase combines the meanings of “I’m in the picture” and “I’m in accord.” It signifies both understanding and agreement with a situation or viewpoint.

  • For example, if someone explains a complex concept and asks if you comprehend and agree, you can respond, “Yes, I’m in harmony with your explanation.”
  • In a team meeting, if someone proposes a new strategy and asks for consensus, you can say, “I’m in harmony with this approach.”
  • When discussing a controversial topic with a friend, you can say, “I’m in harmony with your perspective because it aligns with my values.”

39. I’m in rapport

This phrase implies not only agreement but also a sense of connection or understanding between individuals. It suggests being in sync or on the same wavelength with someone.

  • For instance, if someone shares their thoughts on a topic and asks if you relate, you can respond, “Yes, I’m in rapport with your viewpoint.”
  • In a brainstorming session, if someone suggests an idea and asks if it resonates, you can say, “I’m in rapport with their creative thinking.”
  • When discussing personal experiences with a colleague, you can say, “I’m in rapport with your struggles because I’ve been through something similar.”

40. I’m in step

This phrase is used to indicate that one is in alignment or agreement with a particular action or plan. It suggests being on the same page and moving forward together.

  • For example, if someone proposes a course of action and asks if you’re on board, you can respond, “Yes, I’m in step with your plan.”
  • In a project meeting, if someone suggests a timeline and asks if it works for you, you can say, “I’m in step with the proposed schedule.”
  • When discussing a group activity with friends, you can say, “I’m in step with everyone’s preferences, so let’s go with that option.”

41. I’m in compliance

When someone says “I’m in compliance,” they are acknowledging that they will adhere to the rules or guidelines that have been set.

  • For example, in a business meeting, a team member might say, “I’m in compliance with the new dress code policy.”
  • A person discussing a new law might state, “It’s important for everyone to be in compliance with the regulations.”
  • In a conversation about safety protocols, someone might say, “We need to ensure that everyone is in compliance with the procedures.”

42. I’m in acceptance

When someone says “I’m in acceptance,” they are acknowledging that they understand and accept the situation or information that has been presented.

  • For instance, if someone receives bad news, they might say, “I’m in acceptance of the situation.”
  • In a conversation about a decision made by a group, someone might state, “I’m in acceptance of the outcome.”
  • A person discussing a difficult truth might say, “It took some time, but I’m finally in acceptance of the reality.”

43. I’m in favor

When someone says “I’m in favor,” they are acknowledging that they agree with and support the idea or proposal being discussed.

  • For example, in a debate about a new policy, someone might say, “I’m in favor of this approach.”
  • In a conversation about different options, a person might state, “I’m in favor of Plan A.”
  • A member of a team discussing a strategy might say, “I’m in favor of this new direction.”

44. I’m in support

When someone says “I’m in support,” they are acknowledging that they agree with and will provide assistance or backing to a particular cause, action, or decision.

  • For instance, in a discussion about a charity event, someone might say, “I’m in support of this cause.”
  • In a conversation about a colleague’s project, a team member might state, “I’m in support of your ideas.”
  • A person discussing a political candidate might say, “I’m in support of their campaign.”

45. I’m in alignment

When someone says “I’m in alignment,” they are acknowledging that they agree and are in agreement or harmony with a particular idea, belief, or goal.

  • For example, in a discussion about a team’s mission, someone might say, “I’m in alignment with our goals.”
  • In a conversation about personal values, a person might state, “I’m in alignment with this principle.”
  • A member of a group discussing a strategy might say, “I’m in alignment with this approach.”

46. I’m in consensus

This phrase is used to indicate that the speaker is in agreement with a statement or decision. It implies that the speaker is part of a group or collective that has reached a consensus.

  • For example, in a team meeting, someone might say, “I’m in consensus with the proposed plan of action.”
  • In a group discussion, a participant might state, “I’m in consensus that we should prioritize customer satisfaction.”
  • A person might respond to a suggestion by saying, “I’m in consensus with your idea.”

47. I’m in concurrence

This phrase is similar in meaning to “I’m in consensus” and is used to express agreement with a statement or decision. It suggests that the speaker shares the same opinion or viewpoint as others.

  • For instance, during a debate, someone might say, “I’m in concurrence with my colleague’s argument.”
  • In a team meeting, a participant might state, “I’m in concurrence that we should focus on quality over quantity.”
  • A person might respond to a proposal by saying, “I’m in concurrence with your suggestion.”

48. I’m in union

This phrase is another way to express agreement with a statement or decision. It conveys that the speaker is in alignment with others and supports the same viewpoint.

  • For example, in a group discussion, someone might say, “I’m in union with the team’s decision.”
  • During a meeting, a participant might state, “I’m in union that we should allocate more resources to marketing.”
  • A person might respond to a statement by saying, “I’m in union with your perspective.”

49. Aye aye

This phrase is derived from naval tradition and is used to acknowledge an order or command. It signifies that the speaker has heard and understood the instruction.

  • For instance, in the military, a soldier might respond with “aye aye” to indicate they have received and comprehended an order.
  • In a team setting, a leader might give directions and the team members would respond with “aye aye” to show their acknowledgment.
  • A person might use this phrase in a casual conversation to indicate they understand and agree with what was said.
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50. Fine

This word is used to acknowledge a statement or request. It conveys that the speaker has heard and comprehended the message.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Can you finish this task by the end of the day?”, the response “Fine” would indicate agreement and acknowledgment.
  • In a conversation, one person might say, “I’ll meet you at 6 pm” and the other person could respond with “Fine” to acknowledge the plan.
  • A person might use this word to express acceptance of a situation or decision.

51. Fair enough

This phrase is used to indicate that something is acceptable or reasonable.

  • For example, if someone suggests a compromise in a discussion, the other person might respond with “Fair enough.”
  • In a debate, someone might say, “I see your point, and fair enough, but I still disagree.”
  • If someone apologizes for a mistake, the other person might say, “Apology accepted, fair enough.”

52. Cool

This word is used to express agreement or acknowledgement of something.

  • For instance, if someone suggests a plan and the other person thinks it’s a good idea, they might respond with “Cool.”
  • In a conversation, one person might say, “I’ll pick you up at 7,” and the other person might reply, “Cool, see you then.”
  • If someone shares exciting news, the other person might say, “Wow, that’s cool!”

This phrase is used to express agreement or to indicate that something is correct.

  • For example, if someone states a fact and another person agrees, they might respond with “Right on.”
  • In a conversation, one person might say, “I think we should go to the beach,” and the other person might reply, “Right on, that sounds great.”
  • If someone makes a valid point in a discussion, another person might say, “Right on, I never thought about it that way.”

54. Duly noted

This phrase is used to indicate that something has been acknowledged and understood.

  • For instance, if someone gives instructions, the other person might respond with “Duly noted.”
  • In a meeting, when someone shares important information, another person might say, “Thank you, duly noted.”
  • If someone gives feedback or suggestions, the other person might say, “I appreciate your input, duly noted.”

55. Message received

This phrase is used to indicate that a message has been understood or acknowledged.

  • For example, if someone gives directions, the other person might respond with “Message received.”
  • In a military context, a soldier might report back to their superior with “Message received” to indicate that they understand their orders.
  • If someone sends a text or email asking for confirmation, the other person might reply with “Message received, I’ll get back to you soon.”

56. Loud and clear

This phrase is used to indicate that someone has heard and comprehended a message or request. It is often used in a military or communication context.

  • For example, a soldier might respond to a command with, “Loud and clear, sir!”
  • In a team meeting, a participant might say, “I received your instructions loud and clear.”
  • Someone might reply to a text message saying, “Got it, loud and clear!”

57. I’m on board

This expression signifies agreement and willingness to be involved in a plan or activity. It is commonly used in a professional or collaborative setting.

  • For instance, in a business meeting, someone might say, “I’m on board with the proposed strategy.”
  • In a group project, a team member might declare, “Count me in, I’m on board!”
  • When discussing a social event, a person might respond, “Sounds fun, I’m on board!”

58. I’m in

This phrase indicates agreement and readiness to participate in an activity or plan. It is often used in a casual or informal context.

  • For example, when invited to a party, someone might respond, “Sure, I’m in!”
  • In a discussion about a group outing, a person might say, “Sounds like a great idea, I’m in.”
  • When asked to join a sports game, someone might reply, “Count me in, I’m ready!”

59. I’m down

This slang phrase expresses agreement and enthusiasm for a suggestion or invitation. It is commonly used in casual or social contexts.

  • For instance, when invited to go out for dinner, someone might say, “I’m down, let’s go!”
  • In a conversation about a concert, a person might respond, “I’m down to see that band.”
  • When discussing a fun activity, someone might declare, “Yeah, I’m definitely down for that!”

60. I’m game

This phrase indicates agreement and readiness to participate in an activity or challenge. It is often used in a playful or competitive context.

  • For example, when asked to play a game, someone might respond, “Sure, I’m game!”
  • In a discussion about trying something new, a person might say, “I’m game to give it a try.”
  • When invited to join a friendly competition, someone might reply, “Count me in, I’m game!”

61. Aight

A casual and abbreviated way of saying “alright” or “OK.” It is often used in informal conversations or when agreeing with something.

  • For example, “Aight, I’ll meet you there at 8.”
  • In response to a suggestion, someone might say, “Aight, let’s do it.”
  • When confirming plans, a person might say, “Aight, see you tomorrow.”

62. No problemo

A playful and lighthearted way of saying “no problem” or “you’re welcome.” It is often used in a joking or sarcastic manner.

  • For instance, if someone thanks you for a small favor, you can reply, “No problemo.”
  • When someone apologizes for a minor inconvenience, you can respond, “No problemo at all.”
  • In a humorous situation, a person might say, “No problemo, I’m here to save the day!”

63. 10-4

Originally derived from the ten-code used by law enforcement and emergency services, “10-4” means “message received and understood.” It is often used to acknowledge a message or request.

  • For example, in a walkie-talkie conversation, someone might say, “10-4, I’ll meet you at the designated location.”
  • In a group chat, someone might respond to a question with, “10-4, I’ll take care of it.”
  • When confirming a plan, a person might say, “10-4, I’ll be there on time.”

64. I feel you

A phrase used to express empathy or understanding towards someone’s situation or feelings. It indicates that you can relate to what the person is going through.

  • For instance, if someone shares a personal experience, you can respond, “I feel you.”
  • When someone expresses frustration or disappointment, you can say, “I feel you, it’s tough.”
  • In a conversation about a challenging situation, a person might say, “I feel you, it’s not easy.”

65. Word

A slang term used to indicate agreement or understanding. It can be used as a standalone response or as a way to affirm someone’s statement.

  • For example, if someone suggests a plan, you can respond with “Word.”
  • When someone makes a valid point, you can say, “Word, you’re right.”
  • In a casual conversation, a person might simply respond with “Word” to show agreement.
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66. Got it

This phrase is used to indicate that you have understood or received the message or information being conveyed.

  • For example, if someone gives you instructions, you might respond with, “Got it, I’ll do that.”
  • In a work setting, if your boss assigns you a task, you might say, “Got it, I’ll get started right away.”
  • If someone explains a concept to you, you can respond with, “Got it, thanks for explaining.”

67. Will do

This phrase is used to indicate that you will fulfill a request or complete a task that has been given to you.

  • For instance, if someone asks you to pick up groceries, you might respond with, “Will do, I’ll go to the store later.”
  • In a work setting, if your colleague asks you to send an email, you might say, “Will do, I’ll draft the email and send it out.”
  • If someone asks you to help them move, you can respond with, “Will do, I’ll be there on Saturday.”

68. Consider it done

This phrase is used to assure someone that you will complete a task or fulfill a request that has been made.

  • For example, if your friend asks you to bring snacks to a party, you might say, “Consider it done, I’ll bring chips and dip.”
  • In a work setting, if your manager assigns you a project, you might respond with, “Consider it done, I’ll start working on it immediately.”
  • If someone asks you to make a reservation at a restaurant, you can respond with, “Consider it done, I’ll call and make the reservation.”

69. Acknowledged

This word is used to indicate that you have received and understood a message or request.

  • For instance, if someone sends you an email, you might respond with, “Acknowledged, I’ll reply as soon as possible.”
  • In a military context, if a commanding officer gives an order, you might say, “Acknowledged, sir!”
  • If someone asks you to attend a meeting, you can respond with, “Acknowledged, I’ll be there.”

70. Check

This word is used to indicate that you have understood or comprehended what has been said or asked of you.

  • For example, if someone explains a concept to you, you might respond with, “Check, I understand now.”
  • In a restaurant, if the server confirms your order, they might say, “Check, I have the chicken sandwich.”
  • If someone asks you if you’re ready to leave, you can respond with, “Check, let’s go.”

71. I gotcha

This phrase is used to indicate that someone understands or acknowledges what has been said or done. It is a casual way of showing agreement or comprehension.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Can you pick up some milk on your way home?” and you respond with “I gotcha,” it means you understand the request and will do it.
  • In a conversation where someone is explaining a concept, you might say, “I gotcha, it makes sense now.”
  • If someone apologizes for a mistake and you respond with “I gotcha,“I gotcha,” it means you acknowledge their apology and hold no grudges.