Top 41 Slang For Acknowledging – Meaning & Usage

Acknowledging others in conversation is a crucial part of effective communication, and having the right slang can make it all the more engaging and fun. Whether you’re nodding along in agreement or giving props to someone’s point, we’ve got you covered with a list of the top slang for acknowledging that will take your interactions to the next level. Stay tuned to upgrade your vocabulary and connect with others in a whole new way!

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1. Roger that

This phrase is used to acknowledge that a message has been received and understood. It is commonly used in military and aviation contexts.

  • For example, a pilot might say, “Tower, this is Flight 123. We are ready for takeoff. Roger that.”
  • In a military operation, a soldier might respond to a command with, “Roger that, sir.”
  • During a radio conversation, one person might say, “We need backup at the north entrance.” The other person could reply, “Roger that. Help is on the way.”

2. Copy that

This phrase is similar to “Roger that” and is used to indicate that a message has been received and understood. It is commonly used in radio communications and other situations where clear communication is important.

  • For instance, a police officer might receive instructions over the radio and respond with, “Copy that. I’m on my way.”
  • In a team meeting, someone might say, “We need everyone to be present for the briefing tomorrow morning.” A team member could reply, “Copy that. I’ll make sure everyone is informed.”
  • During a military operation, a soldier might say, “Enemy spotted at coordinates 123. Copy that.” The commanding officer could respond, “Copy that. Engage if necessary.”

3. Got it

This phrase is a simple and informal way to acknowledge that a message has been received and understood. It is used in various contexts, both formal and informal.

  • For example, a teacher might give instructions to students and ask, “Do you all understand?” The students could respond, “Got it.”
  • In a business meeting, someone might explain a new project and ask if everyone understands. A participant could reply, “Got it. Let’s get started.”
  • During a conversation, one person might explain a complex concept and ask if the other person understands. The other person could say, “I got it. Thanks for explaining.”

4. Loud and clear

This phrase is often used in radio communications to indicate that a message has been received clearly and without any interference or distortion.

  • For instance, a pilot might report their position to air traffic control and say, “Tower, this is Flight 123. We are on final approach, loud and clear.”
  • In a military operation, a soldier might use this phrase to confirm that they have received a clear transmission from their commander.
  • During a radio conversation, one person might ask, “Can you hear me?” The other person could reply, “Loud and clear. Over.”

5. Affirmative

This word is used as a formal and concise way to acknowledge a message and indicate agreement or compliance.

  • For example, a security guard might ask, “Do you have a valid ID?” The person entering could respond, “Affirmative.”
  • In a military context, a commander might give an order and ask for confirmation. The subordinate could reply, “Affirmative, sir.”
  • During a radio conversation, one person might ask, “Are you ready to proceed?” The other person could reply, “Affirmative. Let’s go.”

6. Acknowledged

When someone says “acknowledged,” they are indicating that they have received and understood a message or request. It is a way to confirm that they are aware of the information or instruction.

  • For example, in a military context, a soldier might respond with “acknowledged” to indicate that they understand and will comply with an order.
  • In a professional setting, a coworker might say, “I have acknowledged your email and will respond as soon as possible.”
  • A person in a conversation might simply say, “Acknowledged” to show that they have heard and understood what was said.

7. Understood

When someone says “understood,” they are indicating that they have comprehended and grasped the meaning of a message or instruction. It is a way to acknowledge that they have received and processed the information.

  • For instance, a teacher might ask a student, “Did you understand the lesson?” and the student might respond, “Yes, I understood.”
  • In a military or law enforcement context, a command might be given, and the response might be, “Understood, sir.”
  • A person might say, “I understood what you said, and I will take it into consideration.”

8. Noted

When someone says “noted,” they are indicating that they have taken note of a message or information. It is a way to acknowledge that they have received and registered the information, without necessarily indicating agreement or understanding.

  • For example, in a meeting, someone might say, “I noted your suggestion, and we will discuss it further.”
  • In a conversation, one person might say, “I noted your concerns, but I still have some questions.”
  • A supervisor might say to an employee, “I noted your request for time off, and I will get back to you with a decision.”

9. All good

When someone says “all good,” they are indicating that everything is fine or in order. It is a way to acknowledge that there are no problems or issues to address.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Is everything ready for the presentation?” the response might be, “Yes, all good.”
  • In a casual conversation, one person might say, “I just wanted to check if you’re okay,” and the response might be, “Yeah, I’m all good.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t worry about it, everything is all good.”

10. Crystal clear

When someone says “crystal clear,” they are indicating that they understand something completely and without any confusion. It is a way to emphasize that there is no ambiguity or misunderstanding.

  • For example, if someone gives instructions and asks, “Is that clear?” the response might be, “Crystal clear.”
  • In a meeting, a participant might say, “I just want to make sure that everyone understands the plan. Is it crystal clear?”
  • A person might say, “I’ve read the instructions multiple times, and now it’s crystal clear to me.”

11. Aye aye

Derived from naval slang, “aye aye” is a way of acknowledging an order or instruction. It is often used to show respect and compliance.

  • For example, a soldier might respond with “aye aye” when given a command by their superior officer.
  • In a naval setting, a sailor might say “aye aye” in response to a captain’s order.
  • Someone might use “aye aye” humorously to playfully acknowledge a request from a friend.
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“Right on” is an expression used to show agreement or approval. It conveys a sense of enthusiasm and support for the statement or action being acknowledged.

  • For instance, if someone says, “I just got accepted into my dream college,” you might respond with “Right on!”
  • In a conversation about social justice, someone might say, “We need to fight for equality,” and another person might respond, “Right on, I’m with you.”
  • A friend might say, “Let’s go grab some pizza,” and you might reply, “Right on, I’m starving!”

13. Word

“Word” is a slang term used to acknowledge understanding or agreement with what someone has said. It is a simple and casual way to show comprehension.

  • For example, if someone explains a concept to you, you might respond with “Word” to indicate that you understood.
  • In a conversation about plans, someone might say, “Let’s meet at 7 pm,” and you might reply, “Word, see you then.”
  • A friend might share an exciting update and you might respond with “Word” to show your support and understanding.

14. Cool beans

“Cool beans” is a lighthearted expression used to acknowledge something in a positive or favorable way. It conveys a sense of approval or excitement.

  • For instance, if someone tells you they got a promotion at work, you might respond with “Cool beans!”
  • In a discussion about weekend plans, someone might suggest going to a concert and you might say, “Cool beans, I’m in!”
  • A friend might show you a new outfit they bought and you might say, “Cool beans, it looks awesome!”

15. 10-4

“10-4” is a phrase commonly used in radio communication to acknowledge that a message has been received and understood. It is often used in situations where clear and concise communication is important.

  • For example, if a police officer receives instructions over the radio, they might respond with “10-4” to confirm understanding.
  • In a conversation between truck drivers, one might say “I’ll be there in 30 minutes,” and the other might respond with “10-4, see you then.”
  • A person might use “10-4” in a joking manner to acknowledge a friend’s request,“10-4” in a joking manner to acknowledge a friend’s request, saying, “10-4, I’ll bring the snacks.”

16. Solid

This word is used to acknowledge and show agreement or approval with something. It can also be used to describe something as reliable or trustworthy.

  • For example, if someone suggests a plan and you agree with it, you can respond with “Solid idea!”
  • If someone asks if you’re available to help, you can reply with “I’m solid, let’s do it.”
  • When someone shares good news, you can simply say “Solid!” to show your excitement and support.

17. I’m picking up what you’re putting down

This phrase is used to acknowledge that you understand and agree with someone’s message or actions. It’s a way to show that you’re on the same page and share the same understanding.

  • For instance, if someone explains a complex concept and you grasp it, you can respond with “I’m picking up what you’re putting down.”
  • If someone suggests a plan and you think it’s a good idea, you can say “I’m picking up what you’re putting down, let’s go for it.”
  • When someone shares a joke and you find it funny, you can simply say “I’m picking up what you’re putting down, that’s hilarious!”

18. I see you

This phrase is used to acknowledge someone’s presence or actions. It’s a way to let them know that you see and recognize them.

  • For example, if someone shares their opinion and you understand their point of view, you can respond with “I see you.”
  • If someone performs a skill or talent and you appreciate their abilities, you can say “I see you, you’re really talented!”
  • When someone goes out of their way to help you, you can acknowledge their effort by saying “I see you, thank you for your help.”

19. Say no more

This phrase is used to acknowledge that you understand and agree with someone’s implied or suggested message. It’s a way to show that you’re on the same wavelength and there’s no need for further explanation.

  • For instance, if someone hints that they’re tired and want to go home, you can respond with “Say no more, let’s call it a night.”
  • If someone mentions a movie they want to watch and you’re interested too, you can say “Say no more, I’ll grab the popcorn.”
  • When someone suggests a plan and you’re fully on board, you can simply say “Say no more, let’s do it!”

20. I’m on it

This phrase is used to acknowledge that you understand a task or request and you’re ready to take care of it. It’s a way to show that you’re committed to completing the task or fulfilling the request.

  • For example, if someone asks you to find information, you can respond with “I’m on it, I’ll start researching right away.”
  • If someone assigns you a task and you’re confident in your ability to complete it, you can say “I’m on it, you can count on me.”
  • When someone asks for assistance and you’re willing to help, you can simply say “I’m on it, what do you need?”

21. Bet

This slang term is used to acknowledge something and show agreement or confirmation. It can also be used to express understanding or acceptance of a situation.

  • For example, if someone says, “Let’s meet at 7 pm,” you can respond with “Bet” to indicate that you agree.
  • In a conversation about plans, one person might say, “I’ll bring the snacks,” and the other can reply with “Bet.”
  • If someone asks if you’re ready to leave, you can simply respond with “Bet” to indicate that you are.
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22. Duly noted

This phrase is used to indicate that something has been acknowledged and understood. It conveys that the information or request has been received and will be taken into consideration.

  • For instance, if someone gives you instructions, you can respond with “Duly noted” to show that you have understood and will follow them.
  • In a meeting, if someone presents an idea, you can say “Duly noted” to indicate that you have taken note of their suggestion.
  • If someone reminds you of a deadline, you can reply with “Duly noted” to acknowledge that you are aware of it.

23. Say again

This phrase is used to ask someone to repeat what they just said. It is a way of indicating that you didn’t hear or understand what was said and need the person to say it again.

  • For example, if someone speaks too softly or if there is background noise, you can ask them to “Say again?”
  • In a conversation over the phone with a poor connection, you might say “Sorry, say again?” to request a repetition of the information.
  • If someone uses a slang or unfamiliar term, you can ask them to “Say again?” to clarify its meaning.

24. I hear you

This phrase is used to show that you understand and acknowledge someone’s point of view or opinion. It conveys that you have heard and comprehended what the person is saying.

  • For instance, if someone expresses their concerns, you can respond with “I hear you” to show that you understand their perspective.
  • In a discussion where different opinions are being shared, you can use “I hear you” to acknowledge someone’s viewpoint without necessarily agreeing with it.
  • If someone shares their experiences or emotions, you can respond with “I hear you” to show empathy and understanding.

25. I see what you did there

This phrase is used to acknowledge and appreciate a clever or subtle action or statement made by someone. It indicates that you have noticed and understood the intention or hidden meaning behind their action.

  • For example, if someone makes a witty joke or a clever pun, you can respond with “I see what you did there” to show that you appreciate their cleverness.
  • In a conversation where someone uses sarcasm or irony, you can use this phrase to acknowledge their intention.
  • If someone makes a subtle reference or allusion, you can respond with “I see what you did there” to show that you caught onto their hidden message.

26. You bet

This phrase is used to express agreement or confirmation. It is a casual way of saying “yes” or “absolutely.”

  • For example, if someone asks, “Can you help me with this task?” you can respond with “You bet!”
  • In a conversation about attending a party, you might say, “Are you coming?” and the other person might reply, “You bet I am!”
  • If someone thanks you for a favor, you can acknowledge their gratitude by saying, “You bet, happy to help!”

27. No worries

This phrase is used to indicate that there is no need to worry or be concerned. It is a way of reassuring someone that everything is fine.

  • For instance, if someone apologizes for a mistake, you can respond with “No worries, it happens.”
  • In a situation where someone is running late, you can say, “No worries, take your time.”
  • If someone asks if they are bothering you, you can respond with “No worries at all, I enjoy your company.”

28. Gotcha

This term is used to acknowledge that you have understood or grasped something. It is a shortened form of “got you” and is often used in casual conversations.

  • For example, if someone gives you directions, you can respond with “Gotcha, I know where to go now.”
  • In a discussion about a plan, you might say, “So, we meet at 7 pm, gotcha!”
  • If someone explains a concept to you, you can acknowledge their explanation by saying, “Gotcha, thanks for clarifying.”

29. I’m tracking

This phrase is used to indicate that you understand or comprehend what someone is saying. It is often used in professional or formal settings.

  • For instance, if someone explains a complex process, you can respond with “I’m tracking, thank you for explaining.”
  • In a meeting, if someone gives an update, you can acknowledge their information by saying, “I’m tracking, please continue.”
  • If someone asks if you understand their instructions, you can respond with “I’m tracking, I’ll follow your directions.”

30. I’m with you

This expression is used to show that you are in agreement or have understood someone’s point. It is a way of indicating that you are on the same page.

  • For example, if someone shares their opinion, you can respond with “I’m with you, I feel the same way.”
  • In a discussion about a plan, you might say, “I’m with you, let’s proceed as discussed.”
  • If someone explains their reasoning, you can acknowledge their perspective by saying, “I’m with you, that makes sense.”

31. Cool

Used to show agreement or acceptance of something. It can also indicate that something is impressive or interesting.

  • For example, if someone suggests going to a movie, you might respond, “Cool, let’s do it!”
  • When someone shares a funny video, you might comment, “That’s really cool!”
  • If someone asks for your opinion on a new restaurant, you might say, “I’ve heard good things, so cool.”

32. Sure thing

An affirmative response indicating agreement or willingness to do something. It can also be used to acknowledge a request or statement.

  • For instance, if someone asks for a favor, you might reply, “Sure thing, I can help you with that.”
  • When someone confirms plans, you might respond, “Sure thing, see you then!”
  • If someone suggests meeting up for coffee, you might say, “Sure thing, let’s do it.”

33. Yup

A casual and informal way to say “yes” or acknowledge something. It is often used in conversation and informal writing.

  • For example, if someone asks if you want another slice of pizza, you might simply reply, “Yup.”
  • When someone confirms a fact, you might respond, “Yup, that’s correct.”
  • If someone asks if you understand their explanation, you might say, “Yup, I get it.”

34. Absolutely

An emphatic way to express agreement or confirmation. It is often used to indicate strong affirmation or approval.

  • For instance, if someone suggests going to a concert, you might respond, “Absolutely, I love that band!”
  • When someone asks if you’re sure about a decision, you might reply, “Absolutely, I’ve thought it through.”
  • If someone suggests trying a new restaurant, you might say, “Absolutely, I’ve heard great things about it.”

35. No problem

Used to acknowledge a request or assure someone that their request will be accommodated without difficulty. It can also be used to indicate that something is not a burden or inconvenience.

  • For example, if someone asks for a favor, you might reply, “No problem, happy to help.”
  • When someone thanks you for something, you might respond, “No problem, glad I could assist.”
  • If someone apologizes for a small mistake, you might say, “No problem, it happens.”

36. Indeed

Indeed is a word used to express agreement or confirmation. It is often used to acknowledge that something is true or accurate.

  • For example, if someone says, “The sky is blue,” you might respond with, “Indeed, it is.”
  • In a conversation about a shared experience, you might say, “We had a great time at the concert, indeed.”
  • Someone might use the word to emphasize a point, such as, “It was a difficult task, indeed.”

37. Righto

Righto is a slang term used to acknowledge something or indicate agreement. It is similar to saying “okay” or “all right”.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Can you finish this by tomorrow?” you might respond with, “Righto, I’ll get it done.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “Let’s meet at the park at 3 pm, righto?”
  • A person might use the term to show enthusiasm or readiness, like saying, “Righto, let’s get started!”

38. Affirm

Affirm is a word used to acknowledge or confirm something. It is often used to indicate agreement or to validate a statement.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Did you receive my email?” you might respond with, “Affirm, I got it.”
  • In a military setting, a soldier might use the term to respond to a command, such as, “Affirm, moving to position Alpha.”
  • A person might use the word to show support or agreement, like saying, “I affirm your decision to pursue your dreams.”

39. Sure

Sure is a word used to acknowledge something or express agreement. It is often used as a casual way to say “yes” or “okay”.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Can you help me with this task?” you might respond with, “Sure, I can give you a hand.”
  • In a conversation about making plans, someone might say, “Let’s meet for coffee tomorrow, sure?”
  • A person might use the word to show willingness or readiness, like saying, “Sure, I’ll give it a try!”

40. OK

OK is a widely recognized term used to acknowledge something or indicate agreement. It is often used as a simple way to say “all right” or “fine”.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Can we meet at 5 pm?” you might respond with, “OK, that works for me.”
  • In a discussion about a decision, someone might say, “OK, let’s go with Plan B.”
  • A person might use the term to show acceptance or agreement, like saying, “OK, I understand your point of view.”

41. Fine by me

This phrase is used to indicate acceptance or agreement with a suggestion or request. It implies that the person has no objections or concerns.

  • For example, if someone suggests going to a certain restaurant, you might respond, “Fine by me!”
  • In a group discussion, someone might say, “If nobody objects, we’ll go with Plan A. Fine by me.”
  • If asked to take on a particular task, you could reply, “Sure, fine by me.”