Top 54 Slang For Acquaintance – Meaning & Usage

Acquaintances play a unique role in our social circles, bridging the gap between strangers and close friends. But have you ever wondered what slang terms we use to refer to these casual connections? Join us as we unravel the top slang for acquaintance that will have you nodding in recognition and maybe even picking up a new favorite phrase to use in your everyday conversations. Let’s dive in and explore the colorful language we use to navigate the world of acquaintances!

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1. Buddy

A term used to refer to a close friend or companion. “Buddy” is often used in a casual and friendly manner.

  • For example, “Hey buddy, do you want to grab lunch?”
  • In a conversation about childhood memories, someone might say, “I used to play with my buddies at the park every day.”
  • A person might introduce their friend by saying, “This is my buddy, we’ve known each other for years.”

2. Pal

Similar to “buddy,” “pal” is another term used to refer to a friend or companion. It is often used in a lighthearted and informal way.

  • For instance, “Hey pal, how’s it going?”
  • In a discussion about going out, someone might say, “I’m meeting up with some pals for drinks tonight.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve known my pal since we were kids, we’ve been through a lot together.”

3. Mate

A term commonly used in British English to refer to a friend or companion. It is often used in a casual and friendly manner.

  • For example, “Alright, mate? How’s it going?”
  • In a conversation about plans, someone might say, “I’m meeting up with my mates at the pub later.”
  • A person might introduce their friend by saying, “This is my mate, we’ve known each other since college.”

4. Chum

A term used to refer to a close friend or companion. “Chum” is often used in an affectionate and familiar way.

  • For instance, “Hey chum, want to catch a movie tonight?”
  • In a discussion about a trip, someone might say, “I’m going on a road trip with my chums.”
  • A person might say, “My chum and I have been best friends since kindergarten.”

5. Comrade

Originally used to refer to a fellow member of a political or social group, “comrade” has evolved to also mean a friend or companion. It is often used in a supportive and comradely manner.

  • For example, “Hey comrade, let’s grab a coffee and catch up.”
  • In a conversation about teamwork, someone might say, “I trust my comrades to have my back.”
  • A person might introduce their friend by saying, “This is my comrade, we’ve been through thick and thin together.”

6. Amigo

This term is derived from Spanish and is commonly used to refer to a close friend or buddy. It conveys a sense of camaraderie and familiarity.

  • For example, “Hey amigo, let’s grab a drink after work.”
  • A person might introduce their friend by saying, “This is my amigo, we’ve known each other for years.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “I’m meeting up with my amigos later tonight.”

7. Homie

This term originated in African American Vernacular English and is used to refer to a close friend or someone from the same neighborhood. It implies a strong bond and mutual trust.

  • For instance, “What’s up, homie? Long time no see.”
  • Two friends might greet each other by saying, “Yo, homie, how’s it going?”
  • In a conversation about loyalty, someone might say, “My homies always have my back.”

8. Sidekick

This term originally referred to a close companion or assistant who accompanies someone on their adventures. It now generally refers to a close friend or partner who is always by your side.

  • For example, “I’m going to the party with my sidekick, we always have a great time together.”
  • Two friends might jokingly refer to each other as sidekicks, saying, “Batman and Robin, that’s us – the ultimate sidekicks.”
  • In a conversation about reliable friends, someone might say, “I can always count on my sidekick to have my back.”

9. Crony

This term is often used to refer to a close associate or friend, especially in a political or business context. It can sometimes have a negative connotation, implying a relationship based on favoritism or mutual benefit.

  • For instance, “He got the job because he’s the boss’s crony.”
  • Two business partners might refer to each other as cronies, saying, “We’ve been cronies since college.”
  • In a discussion about political alliances, someone might say, “The prime minister and his cronies control most of the decision-making.”

10. Colleague

This term is commonly used to refer to someone you work with or have a professional relationship with. It implies a level of formality and professionalism.

  • For example, “I have a meeting with my colleagues this afternoon.”
  • Two people working on a project together might say, “My colleague and I are collaborating on this assignment.”
  • In a conversation about teamwork, someone might say, “I appreciate the support of my colleagues in achieving our goals.”

11. Cohort

This term refers to a close associate or companion, often used to describe someone who shares a common goal or purpose. It implies a sense of camaraderie and collaboration.

  • For example, two friends planning a prank might say, “We need to find a cohort to help us pull this off.”
  • In a professional setting, a colleague might be referred to as a cohort, as in “My cohort and I have been working on this project together.”
  • A group of friends going on a road trip might say, “We’re a tight-knit cohort, ready for any adventure that comes our way.”

12. Compatriot

This term refers to someone from the same country or with a shared nationality. It implies a sense of unity and shared identity.

  • For instance, during a sports event, fans might cheer for their compatriots, showing support for their national team.
  • A person discussing their travel experiences might say, “I met a fellow compatriot while backpacking through Europe.”
  • In a political context, a leader might address their fellow citizens as compatriots, expressing a sense of belonging and shared responsibility.

13. Ally

An ally refers to someone who supports or helps another person or group, often in a shared cause or common interest. It implies a sense of trust and cooperation.

  • For example, in a team-based video game, players might refer to their teammates as allies.
  • In a social justice movement, individuals or organizations working together towards a common goal might be referred to as allies.
  • A person seeking support might say, “I need allies who can help me make a positive change in my community.”

14. Acquaintance

An acquaintance refers to someone known to a person but not necessarily a close friend or companion. It implies a level of familiarity without deep personal connection.

  • For instance, if you recognize someone from your neighborhood but don’t know their name, you could refer to them as an acquaintance.
  • In a social gathering, you might introduce someone as your acquaintance, indicating that you know them but are not particularly close.
  • A person reflecting on their social circle might say, “I have many acquaintances, but only a few close friends.”

15. Connection

A connection refers to a person with whom one has a relationship, often based on shared experiences or mutual acquaintances. It implies a sense of association or affiliation.

  • For example, if you have a friend who knows someone you want to meet, you can ask for a connection.
  • In a professional context, networking often involves making connections with people in related industries or fields.
  • A person discussing their social network might say, “I have connections in various cities around the world.”

16. Contact

This term refers to someone you are familiar with or have a connection to. It can be used to describe any type of relationship, from casual acquaintances to close friends.

  • For example, “I ran into an old contact at the grocery store.”
  • In a conversation about networking, someone might say, “I have a lot of business contacts in the industry.”
  • Another might ask, “Do you have any contacts who can help me find a job?”

17. Frenemy

This term combines the words “friend” and “enemy” to describe someone who is both a friend and a rival. It refers to a complicated relationship where there is both camaraderie and competition.

  • For instance, “She’s my frenemy – we compete at work but also hang out on weekends.”
  • In a discussion about social dynamics, someone might say, “It’s hard to trust a frenemy – you never know when they’ll stab you in the back.”
  • Another might joke, “My frenemy always tries to one-up me, but I just laugh it off.”

18. Neighbor

This term refers to someone who lives in close proximity to you, typically in the same building or neighborhood. Neighbors often have a casual relationship, with occasional interactions or friendly exchanges.

  • For example, “I borrowed some sugar from my neighbor.”
  • In a conversation about community, someone might say, “It’s nice to have friendly neighbors who look out for each other.”
  • Another might ask, “Have you met your new neighbors yet?”

19. Roomie

This term is a shortened version of “roommate” and is commonly used to refer to someone you share a living space with. It can describe both friends and acquaintances who live together.

  • For instance, “My roomie and I are going to the movies tonight.”
  • In a discussion about living arrangements, someone might say, “Finding a compatible roomie can make all the difference.”
  • Another might joke, “Living with a messy roomie can be a challenge, but it’s all part of the experience.”

20. Wingman

This term originated in the context of dating and refers to a friend who assists and supports you in approaching and interacting with potential romantic partners. The wingman’s role is to provide social proof and help create a favorable impression.

  • For example, “I need a wingman to help me break the ice at the party.”
  • In a conversation about dating strategies, someone might say, “Having a reliable wingman can boost your confidence.”
  • Another might ask, “Can you be my wingman tonight?”

21. Playmate

Playmate refers to a friend or companion with whom one engages in playful activities or spends leisure time. The term is often used to describe a close friend or someone with whom one has a strong bond.

  • For example, “I’m going to the park with my playmate to play basketball.”
  • In a conversation about childhood memories, someone might say, “I used to have a playmate who lived next door, and we would play together every day.”
  • A person might introduce their friend by saying, “This is my playmate, we’ve known each other since kindergarten.”

22. BFF

BFF is an acronym for “Best Friends Forever.” It is used to refer to a very close friend with whom one shares a deep bond and has a strong friendship.

  • For instance, “She’s not just a friend, she’s my BFF.”
  • In a conversation about loyalty, someone might say, “A true BFF will always have your back.”
  • A person might express their appreciation for their BFF by saying, “I don’t know what I would do without my BFF.”

23. Bae

Bae is a term of endearment used to refer to a romantic partner or someone who is considered extremely important and special in one’s life. It stands for “Before Anyone Else.”

  • For example, “I’m going on a date with my bae tonight.”
  • In a conversation about relationships, someone might say, “I’m so lucky to have found my bae.”
  • A person might express their affection by saying, “You mean everything to me, bae.”

24. Pals

Pals is a casual term used to refer to friends or buddies. It implies a friendly and informal relationship between individuals.

  • For instance, “I’m going out for drinks with my pals tonight.”
  • In a conversation about weekend plans, someone might say, “I’m going camping with a group of pals.”
  • A person might introduce their group of friends by saying, “These are my pals, we’ve known each other since college.”

25. Bestie

Bestie is a shortened form of “best friend” and is used to refer to one’s closest and most trusted friend.

  • For example, “She’s not just my friend, she’s my bestie.”
  • In a conversation about friendship, someone might say, “Having a bestie makes life so much better.”
  • A person might express their gratitude for their bestie by saying, “I’m so thankful for my bestie, she’s always there for me.”

26. Confidant

A confidant is someone you trust and share secrets or personal information with. It refers to a person who you feel comfortable confiding in and rely on for support.

  • For example, “He’s my confidant, I can tell him anything and he’ll keep it to himself.”
  • In a conversation about personal relationships, someone might say, “It’s important to have a confidant you can trust.”
  • A person might introduce their confidant by saying, “This is my confidant, we’ve known each other for years.”

27. Compadre

Compadre is a term used to refer to a close friend or buddy. It is often used to describe someone you have a strong bond with and share common interests or experiences.

  • For instance, “Hey compadre, let’s grab a drink after work.”
  • In a conversation about friendship, someone might say, “My compadre has always been there for me.”
  • Two friends might greet each other by saying, “What’s up, compadre?”

28. Familiar

Familiar is a casual term used to describe someone who is a friend or acquaintance. It implies a level of closeness or familiarity with the person.

  • For example, “She’s a familiar face around here, we’ve met a few times.”
  • In a discussion about social circles, someone might say, “I have a few familiar faces in this group.”
  • Two people who know each other but aren’t extremely close might refer to themselves as familiars.
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29. Palooka

Palooka is a slang term used to refer to a buddy or friend. It is often used in a casual or friendly manner when addressing or referring to someone.

  • For instance, “Hey palooka, long time no see!”
  • In a conversation about hanging out, someone might say, “I’m meeting up with a couple of palookas later.”
  • Two friends might jokingly call each other palookas as a term of endearment.

30. Homeboy

Homeboy is a term used to refer to a close friend, especially someone from the same neighborhood or background. It implies a strong bond and shared experiences.

  • For example, “He’s my homeboy, we grew up together.”
  • In a conversation about loyalty, someone might say, “I know I can always count on my homeboys.”
  • Two friends might greet each other by saying, “What’s up, homeboy?”

31. Homegirl

This term is used to refer to a female friend who is like family. It emphasizes a strong bond and loyalty between friends.

  • For example, “I’m going out with my homegirl tonight, we always have a great time.”
  • A person might introduce their friend by saying, “This is my homegirl, we’ve known each other since high school.”
  • When talking about a supportive friend, someone might say, “She’s not just a friend, she’s my homegirl.”

32. Cronies

This word is used to describe a group of close friends who often spend time together and have a strong bond. It can sometimes have a negative connotation, implying exclusivity or favoritism.

  • For instance, “He only hangs out with his cronies, they’re always together.”
  • A person might say, “I’m meeting up with my cronies for lunch, we always have a great time.”
  • When talking about a group of friends, someone might mention, “We’ve been cronies since college, we’ve been through a lot together.”

33. Sidechick

This term is used to refer to a person who is involved in a romantic or sexual relationship with someone who is already in a committed relationship. It implies that the person is not the primary partner and is kept a secret.

  • For example, “He’s cheating on his wife with a sidechick.”
  • A person might say, “I found out he had a sidechick, it was a shock.”
  • When discussing infidelity, someone might say, “Having a sidechick is disrespectful and hurtful to all parties involved.”

34. Ride or Die

This phrase is used to describe a friend who is always there for you, no matter what. They are willing to support you through thick and thin and are considered a true companion.

  • For instance, “She’s my ride or die, she’s always got my back.”
  • A person might introduce their friend by saying, “This is my ride or die, we’ve been through everything together.”
  • When talking about a reliable friend, someone might say, “I know I can always count on him, he’s my ride or die.”

35. Bromance

This term is used to describe a close, non-sexual friendship between two men. It emphasizes a strong bond and camaraderie between male friends.

  • For example, “They have such a strong bromance, they’re practically brothers.”
  • A person might say, “I’m going on a trip with my best friend, it’s a bromance adventure.”
  • When talking about a close male friendship, someone might mention, “Their bromance is the envy of all their friends.”

36. Sis

This term is used to refer to a close female friend or someone who is like a sister. It is often used as a term of endearment or camaraderie.

  • For example, “Hey sis, want to grab some lunch?”
  • A person might say, “My sis always has my back.”
  • When introducing a friend, one might say, “This is my sis, we’ve known each other for years.”

37. Bro

This term is used to refer to a close male friend or someone who is like a brother. It is often used as a term of camaraderie or friendship.

  • For instance, “What’s up, bro? How’s it going?”
  • A person might say, “My bro and I have been friends since childhood.”
  • When asking for a favor, one might say, “Hey bro, can you help me move this weekend?”

38. Sista

This term is used to refer to a close female friend or someone who is like a sister. It is often used as a term of endearment or camaraderie, similar to “sis”.

  • For example, “Hey sista, let’s go shopping together.”
  • A person might say, “My sista is always there for me.”
  • When expressing gratitude, one might say, “Thanks for being an amazing sista.”

39. BFFL

This acronym stands for “Best Friends for Life” and is used to refer to a very close friend or someone who is considered a best friend. It emphasizes the long-lasting bond and loyalty between friends.

  • For instance, “I’m so lucky to have my BFFL by my side.”
  • A person might say, “We’ve been BFFLs since kindergarten.”
  • When reminiscing about shared memories, one might say, “Remember that time we went on that road trip? BFFLs forever!”

40. Squad

This term is used to refer to a close-knit group of friends or a social circle. It implies a sense of unity, support, and camaraderie among the members.

  • For example, “I’m hanging out with my squad tonight.”
  • A person might say, “My squad always has my back.”
  • When introducing a group of friends, one might say, “This is my squad, we’ve been friends for years.”

41. Crew

This term refers to a close-knit group of friends or associates who regularly hang out together and support each other.

  • For example, “I’m going out with my crew tonight to celebrate my birthday.”
  • A person might say, “I have the best crew ever. We always have each other’s backs.”
  • In a conversation about friendship, someone might mention, “My crew is like my second family.”

42. Posse

Originally used to describe a group of people who assist a sheriff or law enforcement officer, “posse” now commonly refers to a group of friends or associates who spend time together.

  • For instance, “I’m meeting up with my posse for a night out on the town.”
  • In a discussion about social circles, someone might say, “She always rolls with her posse wherever she goes.”
  • A person might ask, “Can I join your posse? You guys seem like a fun group.”

43. Homies

A term used to refer to close friends or people who are like family. It is often associated with urban or hip-hop culture.

  • For example, “I’m hanging out with my homies this weekend.”
  • In a conversation about loyalty, someone might say, “My homies always have my back, no matter what.”
  • A person might introduce their friends by saying, “These are my homies. We’ve known each other since high school.”

44. Besties

A term used to describe extremely close friends who share a deep bond and trust. “Besties” is a more affectionate and informal way of referring to best friends.

  • For instance, “I can always count on my besties to cheer me up when I’m feeling down.”
  • In a discussion about friendship, someone might say, “My besties are like family to me.”
  • A person might post a photo with their best friends on social media with the caption, “Forever grateful for these amazing besties in my life.”

45. Wingwoman

A term used to describe a female friend who supports and assists another person, typically in social situations or when trying to meet new people.

  • For example, “I brought my wingwoman to the party to help me meet new people.”
  • In a conversation about dating, someone might say, “Having a wingwoman can make approaching someone less intimidating.”
  • A person might ask their friend, “Will you be my wingwoman tonight? I need some help breaking the ice.”

46. Peeps

This slang term is a shortened version of “people” and is used to refer to a group of individuals or friends.

  • For example, “I’m meeting up with my peeps later for dinner.”
  • A person might ask, “Are your peeps coming to the party?”
  • Someone might say, “I love hanging out with my peeps on the weekends.”

47. Associate

This term refers to someone you know or work with, but may not have a close or personal relationship with.

  • For instance, “I have many associates at my job.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “I need to meet with my associates to discuss the project.”
  • A person might introduce someone as, “This is my associate from work.”

48. Fellow

This term is used to refer to someone who is similar to you in some way or shares a common interest or experience.

  • For example, “He’s a fellow musician, so we often jam together.”
  • In a college setting, someone might say, “I’m going to study with my fellow classmates.”
  • A person might introduce someone as, “This is my fellow traveler on this journey.”

49. Homeboy/Homegirl

These terms are used to refer to a friend who is very close to you or someone you have known for a long time.

  • For instance, “He’s been my homeboy since we were kids.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “I’m going to hang out with my homegirl later.”
  • A person might introduce someone as, “This is my homeboy from the neighborhood.”

50. Soul sister/brother

These terms are used to refer to someone who shares a deep connection with you, similar to that of a sibling.

  • For example, “She’s my soul sister because we understand each other on a deeper level.”
  • A person might say, “He’s not just a friend, he’s my soul brother.”
  • Someone might refer to their best friend as, “She’s more than a friend, she’s my soul sister.”

51. Brudi

This term is derived from the German word “Bruder,” which means brother. It is used to refer to a close acquaintance or friend, often in a casual or familiar manner.

  • For example, “Hey Brudi, what’s up?”
  • Two friends might greet each other by saying, “What’s good, Brudi?”
  • In a group of friends, someone might say, “Brudi, let’s grab a beer after work.”

52. Pato

This slang term is commonly used in Latin American countries, particularly in Mexico, to refer to a friend or acquaintance. It is believed to have originated from the Spanish word for duck, “pato,” which can also be used to mean “buddy” or “pal.”

  • For instance, “¿Qué onda, pato?” translates to “What’s up, duck?”
  • Two friends might use the term affectionately, saying, “Hey pato, let’s hang out this weekend.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might ask, “Have you seen our pato around?”

53. Kawan

This term is commonly used in Malaysia and Indonesia to refer to a friend or acquaintance. It is derived from the Malay word “kawan,” which means friend or companion.

  • For example, “Hey kawan, want to join us for lunch?”
  • Two friends might greet each other by saying, “Hi kawan, long time no see!”
  • In a conversation about plans, someone might ask, “Do you have any kawan who would be interested in joining?”

54. Tovarish

This slang term is derived from the Russian word “товарищ” (tovarish), which means comrade or friend. It was commonly used in the Soviet Union to refer to a fellow member of the Communist Party or a close associate.

  • For instance, “Hello tovarish, let’s work together on this project.”
  • Two people with shared interests might address each other as tovarish, saying, “Good to see you, tovarish!”
  • In a historical context, someone might refer to a former Soviet citizen as a tovarish.
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