Top 52 Slang For Addicted – Meaning & Usage

Addiction is a serious issue that affects many individuals, but the slang surrounding it can sometimes be lighthearted and relatable. Join us as we uncover some of the most common and quirky slang terms used to describe addiction and those who are addicted. Whether you’re looking to expand your vocabulary or simply stay in the know, this listicle is sure to provide some interesting insights into this topic.

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1. Hooked

This term refers to being strongly dependent on a substance or behavior. It implies a compulsive need and inability to stop or control the addiction.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m hooked on caffeine. I can’t start my day without a cup of coffee.”
  • In a conversation about gambling, someone might admit, “I got hooked on online poker and lost a lot of money.”
  • A person struggling with drug addiction might say, “I’m hooked on heroin and need help to quit.”

2. Junkie

This word is often used to describe someone who is addicted to drugs, particularly illegal substances. It can carry a negative connotation and is sometimes used in a derogatory manner.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He’s a heroin junkie. He needs professional help.”
  • In a discussion about the opioid epidemic, one might mention, “Many junkies turn to crime to support their drug habits.”
  • A person sharing a personal story might say, “I used to be a junkie, but I’ve been clean for five years now.”

3. Fiend

This term describes someone who is extremely addicted to a substance or behavior. It implies a strong craving and an intense desire to satisfy the addiction.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s a nicotine fiend. He can’t go an hour without a cigarette.”
  • In a conversation about video game addiction, someone might comment, “I used to be a fiend for World of Warcraft. I would play for hours on end.”
  • A person struggling with food addiction might say, “I’m a fiend for sweets. I can’t resist a slice of cake.”

4. Craving

This term refers to a strong and persistent longing or hunger for something, often associated with addiction. It can be used to describe both physical and psychological cravings.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I have a craving for chocolate. I need to satisfy my sweet tooth.”
  • In a discussion about alcoholism, one might mention, “Cravings for alcohol can be a major challenge for recovering addicts.”
  • A person sharing their experience with drug addiction might say, “The cravings for heroin were unbearable during withdrawal.”

5. Dopehead

This slang term is used to describe someone who is heavily addicted to drugs, particularly illegal substances. It carries a derogatory connotation and is often used to stigmatize drug users.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s a dopehead. He’s lost everything to his addiction.”
  • In a conversation about the impact of drug abuse, one might comment, “Dopeheads often resort to desperate measures to support their habits.”
  • A person sharing their journey to recovery might say, “I used to be a dopehead, but I’ve turned my life around.”

6. Junked out

This term is used to describe someone who is heavily under the influence of drugs or addicted to drugs. It implies a state of being completely consumed by drug use.

  • For example, “He’s junked out on heroin and can’t function anymore.”
  • A person might say, “She used to be a talented artist, but now she’s completely junked out.”
  • In a conversation about addiction, someone might explain, “When you’re junked out, nothing else matters except getting your next fix.”

7. Strung out

This term is used to describe someone who is in a state of extreme addiction or drug dependency. It suggests a sense of desperation and physical or emotional deterioration.

  • For instance, “He’s been strung out on meth for years and it’s taken a toll on his health.”
  • A person might say, “She looks really strung out. I’m worried about her.”
  • In a discussion about the impact of addiction, someone might explain, “When you’re strung out, your whole life revolves around getting high.”

8. Tweaking

This term is used to describe someone who is engaging in erratic or compulsive behavior due to drug use, particularly stimulant drugs like methamphetamine. It implies a state of extreme agitation and restlessness.

  • For example, “He’s been tweaking for days on meth and hasn’t slept.”
  • A person might say, “She’s tweaking so hard, she can’t sit still for a minute.”
  • In a conversation about the effects of drugs, someone might explain, “When you’re tweaking, your mind is racing and you have no control over your actions.”

9. Chasing the dragon

This term is used to describe someone who is engaging in the continuous pursuit of a pleasurable but destructive experience, particularly related to drug use. It originates from the practice of inhaling heroin fumes, which is likened to chasing a mythical dragon.

  • For instance, “He’s been chasing the dragon for years, always searching for that initial high.”
  • A person might say, “She’s trapped in a cycle of chasing the dragon, never satisfied.”
  • In a discussion about addiction, someone might explain, “Chasing the dragon is a dangerous game that can lead to a downward spiral of drug abuse.”

10. Cracked out

This term is used to describe someone who is in a state of extreme intoxication or addiction, particularly to crack cocaine. It suggests a sense of complete disarray and loss of control.

  • For example, “He’s cracked out and can’t even form coherent sentences.”
  • A person might say, “She’s been up all night, cracked out on crack cocaine.”
  • In a conversation about the devastating effects of addiction, someone might explain, “When you’re cracked out, you’re completely consumed by the drug and your life falls apart.”

11. Hyped up

When someone is “hyped up,” they are feeling extremely excited or energized. This term can also refer to being under the influence of drugs or stimulants, causing a heightened state of excitement.

  • For example, “I was so hyped up for the concert, I couldn’t sleep the night before.”
  • A person on drugs might say, “I’m feeling so hyped up right now, I can’t sit still.”
  • Someone might describe their friend as, “She’s always hyped up and ready for any adventure.”

12. Spun out

Being “spun out” refers to feeling disoriented or mentally overwhelmed, often as a result of drug use. This term can also describe someone who is behaving erratically or unpredictably.

  • For instance, “After staying awake for days, he was completely spun out and couldn’t focus on anything.”
  • A person under the influence might say, “I took too much and now I’m feeling spun out.”
  • Someone observing a friend’s erratic behavior might comment, “He’s been acting really spun out lately, I’m worried about him.”

13. Geeked

To be “geeked” means to be extremely excited or high on drugs. This term can also refer to being overly focused or obsessed with a particular topic or activity.

  • For example, “She was geeked about the upcoming concert, she couldn’t stop talking about it.”
  • A person under the influence might say, “I took some pills and now I’m feeling geeked.”
  • Someone describing their friend’s intense enthusiasm might say, “He’s always geeked about video games, it’s his passion.”

14. Dusted

When someone is “dusted,” they are under the influence of drugs, particularly cocaine. This term can also refer to being mentally overwhelmed or confused.

  • For instance, “He was acting really strange, like he was totally dusted.”
  • A person under the influence might say, “I just got dusted, man, I feel amazing.”
  • Someone observing erratic behavior might comment, “She’s acting really dusted, she needs help.”

15. Zonked

To be “zonked” means to be extremely tired or under the influence of drugs. This term can also refer to being mentally or physically exhausted.

  • For example, “After a long day at work, I was completely zonked.”
  • A person under the influence might say, “I smoked so much weed, I’m feeling totally zonked.”
  • Someone describing their friend’s exhaustion might say, “She’s been working double shifts, she’s zonked out every night.”

16. Buzzed

This term is often used to describe the feeling of being slightly intoxicated or under the influence of drugs or alcohol. It can also refer to the state of being excited or energized.

  • For example, “I had a few drinks at the party and now I’m feeling buzzed.”
  • Someone might say, “I love the buzzed feeling I get after a cup of coffee.”
  • A person describing their weekend might say, “We went out dancing and got a little buzzed on the dance floor.”

17. Crunk

This slang term originated in the hip-hop and party scene to describe a state of being both crazy and drunk. It can also refer to the genre of music that combines hip-hop and electronic dance music.

  • For instance, “We got crunk at the club last night and danced all night long.”
  • A person might say, “I love listening to crunk music when I’m getting ready to go out.”
  • Someone might describe a wild party by saying, “It was a crunkfest with everyone dancing and having a great time.”

18. Blasted

This term is used to describe a state of being extremely intoxicated or under the influence of drugs or alcohol. It can also refer to experiencing a strong impact or explosion.

  • For example, “I got blasted at the party and don’t remember anything.”
  • A person might say, “He was so blasted that he couldn’t even walk straight.”
  • Someone might describe a powerful explosion by saying, “The building was blasted to pieces by the bomb.”

19. Smacked

This slang term is often used to describe someone who is heavily under the influence of drugs, particularly heroin. It can also refer to being hit or struck with force.

  • For instance, “He was so smacked that he couldn’t even keep his eyes open.”
  • A person might say, “I saw him on the street, completely smacked out of his mind.”
  • Someone might describe a hard punch by saying, “He smacked me right in the face.”

20. Tripping

This term is used to describe the state of being under the influence of hallucinogenic drugs, such as LSD or mushrooms. It can also refer to experiencing confusion or disorientation.

  • For example, “I was tripping so hard last night, I thought the walls were melting.”
  • A person might say, “She’s tripping on acid, so she might not be able to hold a coherent conversation.”
  • Someone might describe a confusing situation by saying, “I feel like I’m tripping, everything is so surreal.”

21. Faded

When someone is “faded,” it means they are intoxicated or under the influence of drugs or alcohol.

  • For example, “I went to the party last night and got totally faded.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling so faded right now, I can’t even walk straight.”
  • In a discussion about partying, someone might ask, “Who’s down to get faded tonight?”

22. Stuck

Being “stuck” refers to the inability to stop or break free from a habit or addiction.

  • For instance, “I’ve been trying to quit smoking for years, but I’m stuck.”
  • A person might say, “I feel so stuck in this cycle of addiction, I don’t know how to get out.”
  • In a support group, someone might share, “I’m stuck in this pattern of destructive behavior and I need help.”

23. Jonezing

To “jones” or “jonezing” means to experience intense cravings or withdrawal symptoms, often related to a substance or addictive behavior.

  • For example, “I’m jonezing for a cigarette right now, I need one so bad.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been clean for a week, but I’m still jonezing for heroin.”
  • In a conversation about quitting caffeine, someone might say, “I always start jonezing for coffee in the afternoon.”

24. Spun

Being “spun” refers to being high on methamphetamine, a powerful stimulant drug.

  • For instance, “He’s been up for days on a meth binge, he’s totally spun.”
  • A person might say, “I used to be spun all the time, but I’ve been clean for a year now.”
  • In a discussion about the dangers of methamphetamine, someone might share, “I saw my friend’s life spiral out of control when he got hooked on spun.”

25. Baked

Being “baked” means being under the influence of marijuana or cannabis.

  • For example, “We smoked a joint and got totally baked.”
  • A person might say, “I love getting baked and watching movies.”
  • In a conversation about the effects of marijuana, someone might ask, “Do you prefer to get baked or just have a little buzz?”

26. Wrecked

This term is often used to describe someone who is heavily intoxicated or under the influence of drugs or alcohol.

  • For example, “After a night of partying, he was completely wrecked.”
  • A person discussing a wild night out might say, “We got absolutely wrecked last night.”
  • Someone might warn a friend, “Don’t drink too much, or you’ll end up getting wrecked.”

27. Stoked

This term is used to describe someone who is extremely excited or enthusiastic about something.

  • For instance, “I’m so stoked for the concert tomorrow.”
  • A person discussing a new job might say, “I’m really stoked about starting my new role.”
  • Someone might express their excitement by saying, “I’m absolutely stoked to see my favorite band live.”

28. Cranked

This term is often used to describe someone who is addicted to a drug or substance.

  • For example, “He’s been cranked on meth for years.”
  • A person discussing drug addiction might say, “It’s important to seek help if you’re cranked on drugs.”
  • Someone might express concern by saying, “I think he’s cranked on opioids, we need to get him help.”

29. Crunked

This term is used to describe someone who is extremely intoxicated or under the influence of drugs.

  • For instance, “They got crunked at the party last night.”
  • A person discussing a wild night out might say, “We were all crunked on shots.”
  • Someone might warn a friend, “Don’t mix alcohol and drugs, or you’ll end up getting crunked.”

30. Spazzed

This term is often used to describe someone who is acting in a hyperactive or erratic manner.

  • For example, “He spazzed out when he heard the news.”
  • A person discussing a friend’s behavior might say, “She completely spazzed at the party.”
  • Someone might express annoyance by saying, “Stop spazzing out, it’s not a big deal.”

31. Lit up

This term refers to being intoxicated or under the influence of drugs or alcohol. It can also be used to describe feeling a strong effect from a substance.

  • For example, “After a few drinks, he was completely lit up.”
  • In a conversation about partying, someone might say, “We got lit up last night at the club.”
  • A person describing a strong reaction to a drug might say, “That pill really lit me up.”

32. Blown

This slang term is used to describe being extremely high or intoxicated. It can also refer to being overwhelmed or amazed by something.

  • For instance, “After smoking that joint, I was completely blown.”
  • In a discussion about partying, someone might say, “We all got blown at the concert last night.”
  • A person describing a mind-blowing experience might say, “The special effects in that movie had me blown.”

33. Tripped out

This phrase is used to describe being under the influence of hallucinogenic drugs or experiencing intense hallucinations. It can also be used to describe being in a state of confusion or surprise.

  • For example, “After taking that acid, I really tripped out.”
  • In a conversation about drug experiences, someone might say, “I’ve never tripped out as much as I did on mushrooms.”
  • A person describing a surprising or confusing situation might say, “I was totally tripped out when I saw my ex at the party.”

34. Smashed

This term is used to describe being heavily intoxicated or under the influence of drugs. It can also be used to describe something being destroyed or damaged.

  • For instance, “He got completely smashed at the bar last night.”
  • In a discussion about partying, someone might say, “We were all smashed at the house party.”
  • A person describing a car accident might say, “The front of the car was completely smashed.”

35. Zooted

This slang term is used to describe being high or intoxicated, often to an extreme degree. It can also be used to describe something moving quickly or in an erratic manner.

  • For example, “After smoking that blunt, I was zooted.”
  • In a conversation about partying, someone might say, “We all got zooted at the music festival.”
  • A person describing a fast and unpredictable car might say, “That car was zooted down the street.”

36. Geeked up

This term is often used to describe someone who is under the influence of drugs or alcohol and is experiencing heightened effects or intense euphoria. It can also refer to someone who is excessively excited or enthusiastic about something.

  • For example, “After taking that pill, I was geeked up all night.”
  • A person might say, “I’m geeked up for the concert tonight!”
  • In a party setting, someone might exclaim, “Let’s get geeked up and have a great time!”

37. Bent

This slang term is used to describe someone who is intoxicated or high on drugs. It can also refer to someone who is behaving strangely or erratically due to the effects of substances.

  • For instance, “He was so bent after smoking that joint.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t remember anything from last night, I was completely bent.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might ask, “Are you feeling bent after those drinks?”

38. Wacked

This term is commonly used to describe someone who is acting irrationally or behaving in an unpredictable manner. It can also refer to someone who is under the influence of drugs and experiencing hallucinations or delusions.

  • For example, “He was wacked out on drugs and couldn’t make any sense.”
  • A person might say, “She’s acting wacked, we should get her some help.”
  • In a discussion about someone’s unusual behavior, someone might comment, “He’s been wacked for days, it’s really concerning.”

39. Whacked out

This slang term is used to describe someone who is heavily intoxicated or high on drugs. It implies a state of being completely out of control or disconnected from reality.

  • For instance, “He was so whacked out that he couldn’t even stand.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve never seen anyone as whacked out as she was last night.”
  • In a conversation about a wild party, someone might comment, “Everyone was whacked out, it was a crazy night!”

40. Fiending

This term is often used to describe someone who is experiencing intense cravings for drugs or a specific substance. It implies a strong desire or need that is difficult to control.

  • For example, “I’m fiending for a cigarette, I need one right now.”
  • A person might say, “She’s been fiending for cocaine all day, it’s really concerning.”
  • In a discussion about addiction, someone might comment, “Once you start fiending, it’s hard to stop.”

41. Dope fiend

This term refers to someone who is addicted to drugs, particularly illegal substances. It is often used to describe a person who is consumed by their addiction and will do anything to obtain drugs.

  • For example, “He used to be a successful businessman, but now he’s just a dope fiend.”
  • In a discussion about the opioid epidemic, someone might say, “We need to provide more resources for dope fiends to get help.”
  • A recovering addict might share their story by saying, “I was a dope fiend for years, but now I’m clean and sober.”

42. Dope sick

This term refers to the physical and psychological symptoms that occur when a drug addict stops using drugs. It is often used to describe the intense discomfort and sickness that addicts experience during withdrawal.

  • For instance, “He couldn’t handle the dope sickness anymore, so he went back to using.”
  • In a support group for addicts, someone might share, “I’ve been clean for six months, but I still struggle with dope sickness.”
  • A healthcare professional might explain, “Dope sickness can be incredibly painful and challenging to overcome without proper medical assistance.”

43. On the nod

This term refers to the state of being under the influence of drugs, particularly opioids, where a person is in a drowsy or semi-conscious state. It is often used to describe the effects of drugs that cause sedation and nodding off.

  • For example, “He was on the nod for hours after taking a large dose of heroin.”
  • In a conversation about the dangers of drug use, someone might say, “People who are on the nod are at risk of overdosing.”
  • A person sharing their experience with addiction might mention, “I used to spend my days on the nod, completely disconnected from reality.”

44. Jonesing

This term refers to a strong craving or desire for drugs, particularly when experiencing withdrawal symptoms. It is often used to describe the intense urge that addicts feel when they are in need of their drug of choice.

  • For instance, “He was jonesing so badly for a fix that he would do anything to get it.”
  • In a discussion about the challenges of recovery, someone might say, “The hardest part for me is dealing with the constant jonesing.”
  • A person sharing their journey to sobriety might explain, “I’ve learned to recognize when I’m jonesing and find healthy ways to cope instead.”

45. Dopesick

This term refers to the physical and psychological symptoms that occur when a drug addict stops using drugs. It is often used to describe the feeling of sickness and discomfort that addicts experience during withdrawal.

  • For example, “She was dopesick for days after quitting heroin cold turkey.”
  • In a support group for addicts, someone might share, “I hate feeling dopesick, but I know it’s a necessary part of the recovery process.”
  • A healthcare professional might advise, “If you’re dopesick, seek medical help to manage your withdrawal symptoms safely.”

46. Addict

This term refers to a person who is dependent on a particular substance or activity. It is commonly used to describe someone who is addicted to drugs.

  • For example, “He’s been struggling with addiction for years and is now seeking help as a recovering addict.”
  • In a support group meeting, someone might say, “My name is John and I’m an addict.”
  • A news article might discuss the impact of addiction by stating, “Addicts often face numerous challenges in their journey to recovery.”

47. Junked up

This phrase is used to describe someone who is under the influence of drugs or experiencing the effects of drug use.

  • For instance, “He was so junked up on heroin that he couldn’t even stand.”
  • In a conversation about substance abuse, someone might say, “I’ve seen people completely junked up and it’s a sad sight.”
  • A person might describe their own experience by saying, “I used to get junked up every weekend, but I’ve been clean for a year now.”

48. Fix

This term is often used to refer to the act of taking drugs to satisfy a craving or to alleviate withdrawal symptoms.

  • For example, “He needed a fix to stop the shaking and sweating.”
  • In a discussion about drug addiction, someone might say, “The constant need for a fix is what drives many addicts.”
  • A recovering addict might share their journey by stating, “I used to wake up every morning, desperate for my first fix of the day.”

49. Tweaker

This slang term is used to describe someone who is addicted to or frequently uses stimulant drugs, such as methamphetamine.

  • For instance, “He’s a notorious tweaker in the community, always causing trouble.”
  • In a conversation about the dangers of drug abuse, someone might say, “Tweakers often exhibit erratic behavior and can be a danger to themselves and others.”
  • A news report might discuss the impact of tweakers on a neighborhood by stating, “Residents are concerned about the increase in crime associated with tweaker activity.”

50. Habitual

This term is used to describe someone who engages in a particular activity or behavior on a regular or consistent basis, often to the point of addiction.

  • For example, “He’s a habitual smoker, going through several packs of cigarettes a day.”
  • In a discussion about addictive behaviors, someone might say, “Being a habitual gambler can lead to financial ruin.”
  • A therapist might use the term to describe a patient by stating, “She’s a habitual overeater, using food as a coping mechanism.”

51. Wired

This term refers to being under the influence of drugs, particularly stimulants like cocaine or amphetamines. It describes the feeling of being highly energized and alert due to drug use.

  • For example, someone might say, “I was so wired last night, I couldn’t sleep at all.”
  • In a conversation about drug use, a person might mention, “He’s always wired on something, you can never keep up with him.”
  • A user might post on a forum, “Anyone else feeling really wired after taking that pill?”

52. Hopped up

This slang term is used to describe someone who is under the influence of drugs, particularly stimulants like methamphetamine or amphetamines. It conveys the idea of being highly energized, restless, or agitated.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He’s always hopped up on something, he can’t sit still for a minute.”
  • In a discussion about drug addiction, a person might mention, “I used to get hopped up on pills just to get through the day.”
  • A user might post on a social media platform, “Feeling hopped up after a night of partying, can’t calm down!”
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