Top 42 Slang For Addiction – Meaning & Usage

Addiction slang has its own language that can be confusing for those not in the know. But fear not, we’ve got you covered. Our team has put together a list of the top slang terms for addiction that will not only educate you but also keep you in the loop with the latest trends in this area. So, buckle up and get ready to expand your vocabulary while staying informed about this important topic.

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1. Hooked

This term refers to being heavily dependent on a substance or behavior, often with negative consequences. It can be used to describe someone who is physically or psychologically addicted.

  • For example, “He’s been hooked on painkillers for years and can’t seem to quit.”
  • In a conversation about gambling addiction, someone might say, “I used to be hooked on slot machines.”
  • A friend might express concern by saying, “I think she’s hooked on social media. She can’t put her phone down.”

2. Junkie

This is a derogatory term for someone who is addicted to drugs. It implies a strong dependence on drugs and a lack of control over one’s drug use.

  • For instance, “He used to be a heroin junkie, but he’s been clean for two years now.”
  • In a discussion about the opioid crisis, someone might say, “Junkies are often stigmatized and denied access to treatment.”
  • A news article might refer to “the life of a junkie” to describe the struggles and dangers of drug addiction.

3. Fiend

This term describes a strong desire or craving for a substance or behavior, often associated with addiction. It can be used to describe someone who is constantly seeking their drug of choice or engaging in addictive behaviors.

  • For example, “He’s a fiend for cigarettes. He can’t go an hour without smoking.”
  • In a conversation about sugar addiction, someone might say, “I’m a fiend for chocolate. I can’t resist it.”
  • A friend might express concern by saying, “She’s a fiend for attention. She’s always seeking validation from others.”

4. Addict

This term refers to someone who is physically or psychologically dependent on a substance or behavior. It can be used to describe someone who has a compulsive need for a particular substance or activity.

  • For instance, “He’s an addict. He can’t function without his daily dose of caffeine.”
  • In a discussion about internet addiction, someone might say, “Many people don’t realize they’re addicts until it starts affecting their daily lives.”
  • A therapist might use the term “addict” to describe someone with a substance use disorder or behavioral addiction.

5. Dope fiend

This term specifically refers to someone who is addicted to drugs, particularly illegal drugs like heroin or cocaine. It carries a negative connotation and implies a strong dependence on drugs.

  • For example, “He used to be a dope fiend, but he’s been in recovery for five years now.”
  • In a conversation about the opioid epidemic, someone might say, “Dope fiends often resort to desperate measures to get their next fix.”
  • A news article might use the term “dope fiend” to describe the struggles and dangers of drug addiction.

6. Tweaker

This term is commonly used to refer to someone who abuses methamphetamine, a highly addictive stimulant drug. It is derived from the physical and behavioral effects of the drug, which can cause users to exhibit repetitive, compulsive behaviors and experience heightened alertness.

  • For example, “I saw a tweaker on the street who was acting really paranoid.”
  • In a discussion about drug addiction, someone might say, “Tweakers often experience severe weight loss and dental problems.”
  • A news article might describe the effects of methamphetamine by stating, “Long-term use of the drug can turn a person into a tweaker, with visible signs of physical and psychological deterioration.”

7. Pill popper

This term is used to describe someone who abuses prescription drugs, often by taking them in large quantities or without a legitimate medical need. It refers to the act of “popping” pills, which can encompass a range of medications such as painkillers, sedatives, or stimulants.

  • For instance, “She’s known as a pill popper because she’s constantly taking prescription drugs.”
  • In a conversation about the opioid epidemic, someone might mention, “Many pill poppers start by misusing painkillers prescribed to them.”
  • A news article might discuss the dangers of pill popping by stating, “The rise in pill poppers has led to an increase in overdoses and addiction rates.”

8. Smackhead

This slang term is used to refer to someone who is addicted to heroin, a highly potent and addictive opioid drug. The term “smack” is a common street name for heroin, and “head” refers to a user or addict.

  • For example, “He’s a known smackhead who has been struggling with heroin addiction for years.”
  • In a discussion about the opioid crisis, someone might mention, “Smackheads often resort to desperate measures to support their addiction.”
  • A news article might describe the devastating effects of heroin addiction by stating, “Once a promising student, she became a shell of her former self as a result of her life as a smackhead.”

9. Cokehead

This term is used to describe someone who is addicted to cocaine, a powerful stimulant drug. It combines the word “coke,” which is a common street name for cocaine, with “head,” which refers to a user or addict.

  • For instance, “He’s a cokehead who has lost everything due to his addiction.”
  • In a conversation about the dangers of cocaine, someone might say, “Cokeheads often experience severe physical and psychological effects.”
  • A news article might discuss the prevalence of cocaine addiction by stating, “The number of cokeheads seeking treatment has been on the rise in recent years.”

10. Alkie

This slang term is used to refer to someone who is addicted to alcohol and regularly consumes excessive amounts of it. The term “alkie” is derived from the word “alcohol.”

  • For example, “He’s known as an alkie because he drinks heavily every day.”
  • In a discussion about the impact of alcoholism, someone might mention, “Alkies often struggle with maintaining relationships and employment.”
  • A news article might highlight the health risks associated with alcoholism by stating, “Long-term alcohol abuse can lead to serious health problems for alkies, including liver damage and cognitive impairment.”

11. Nic fiend

A “nic fiend” is someone who is addicted to nicotine, typically from smoking cigarettes or using other tobacco products. The term emphasizes the strong craving and dependence on nicotine.

  • For example, a smoker might say, “I need a smoke, I’m a total nic fiend.”
  • In a discussion about quitting smoking, someone might share, “I used to be a nic fiend, but I’ve been nicotine-free for six months now.”
  • A person struggling with their addiction might admit, “I hate being a nic fiend, but I can’t seem to quit.”

12. Tripper

A “tripper” is someone who uses hallucinogenic drugs, such as LSD or magic mushrooms, to experience hallucinations and altered states of consciousness. The term refers to the intense and often unpredictable nature of these drug-induced experiences.

  • For instance, a person might say, “Last night, I took some acid and became a tripper.”
  • In a conversation about psychedelic experiences, someone might share, “I’m a regular tripper and have had some mind-blowing trips.”
  • A person discussing the potential risks might warn, “Becoming a tripper can be a wild ride, so it’s important to be in a safe and comfortable environment.”

13. Crankster

A “crankster” is someone who uses methamphetamine, commonly known as “crank,” as a recreational drug. The term highlights the high energy and hyperactivity often associated with meth use.

  • For example, a person might say, “I used to be a crankster, but I’ve been clean for two years now.”
  • In a discussion about the dangers of meth, someone might share, “Being a crankster took a toll on my physical and mental health.”
  • A person expressing concern for a loved one might say, “I’m worried about my friend, they’ve become a crankster and their behavior has changed drastically.”

14. Hophead

A “hophead” is someone who is addicted to drugs, particularly opioids or opiate-based substances. The term emphasizes the intense craving and dependence on these substances.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I used to be a hophead, but I’ve been in recovery for five years now.”
  • In a conversation about the opioid epidemic, someone might share, “Many hopheads turn to heroin when prescription painkillers become too expensive.”
  • A person discussing the challenges of addiction might admit, “Being a hophead is a constant struggle, but recovery is possible with the right support.”

15. Brewski

A “brewski” is a slang term for an alcoholic beverage, particularly beer. The term is often used in a casual and lighthearted manner.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m heading to the bar for a few brewskis with friends.”
  • In a discussion about different types of beer, someone might share, “I love trying new craft brewskis.”
  • A person planning a party might say, “Make sure to bring some brewskis, it’s going to be a fun night.”

16. Fiending

This term refers to a strong and intense craving for drugs or a particular substance. It is often used to describe the desperate need or desire to satisfy an addiction.

  • For example, “I’m fiending for a cigarette right now.”
  • A person struggling with a drug addiction might say, “I can’t stop fiending for heroin.”
  • In a conversation about substance abuse, someone might ask, “Have you ever fiended for a drug?”

17. Tweaking

Tweaking is a slang term used to describe the behavior of someone who is under the influence of drugs, particularly methamphetamine. It refers to the state of being hyperactive, agitated, or acting in an erratic or obsessive manner.

  • For instance, “He’s been up for days tweaking on meth.”
  • A person might say, “I couldn’t sleep last night because my neighbor was tweaking and making a lot of noise.”
  • In a discussion about the effects of drugs, someone might mention, “Tweaking is a common symptom of methamphetamine use.”

18. Chasing the dragon

This phrase is often used to describe the continuous pursuit of a more intense or euphoric high from drug use. It originated from the practice of inhaling the vapor from heated heroin on tin foil, which creates a dragon-like image.

  • For example, “He’s been chasing the dragon for years, always looking for a stronger high.”
  • A person discussing the dangers of drug addiction might say, “Chasing the dragon can lead to a downward spiral of addiction.”
  • In a conversation about substance abuse recovery, someone might ask, “How did you finally stop chasing the dragon?”

19. Getting lit

This slang term is often used to describe the act of getting high or intoxicated on drugs or alcohol. It refers to the feeling of being “lit up” or euphoric after consuming substances.

  • For instance, “We’re going to the party tonight to get lit.”
  • A person might say, “I had a few drinks and got lit last night.”
  • In a discussion about recreational drug use, someone might mention, “Getting lit can be a way to escape reality temporarily.”

20. Strung out

This term is used to describe someone who is physically and mentally exhausted or depleted due to prolonged drug use. It refers to the state of being “strung out” or worn down from the effects of addiction.

  • For example, “He looks strung out after weeks of drug use.”
  • A person discussing the consequences of substance abuse might say, “Being strung out can lead to serious health issues.”
  • In a conversation about recovery, someone might ask, “How can we support those who are strung out and help them get back on track?”

21. Dusted

To be “dusted” means to be high on cocaine or another powdered drug. It refers to the white powder that is often associated with these substances.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s been dusted all night, he can barely keep his eyes open.”
  • In a conversation about drug use, a person might ask, “Have you ever been dusted before?”
  • A user might share their experience by saying, “I tried cocaine for the first time last night, and I got completely dusted.”

22. Cracked out

To be “cracked out” means to be in a state of extreme intoxication from crack cocaine. It describes the intense high and altered state of mind that can result from using this powerful stimulant.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He’s been up for days, completely cracked out.”
  • In a discussion about drug addiction, a person might mention, “I’ve seen what crack can do to people, and it’s heartbreaking when they’re cracked out.”
  • A user might share their personal struggle by saying, “I used to be cracked out all the time, but I’ve been clean for a year now.”

23. Hitting rock bottom

To “hit rock bottom” means to reach the lowest point in one’s life or addiction. It refers to a moment of extreme despair or loss of control, often associated with addiction.

  • For example, someone might say, “After losing his job and his family, he finally hit rock bottom.”
  • In a conversation about recovery, a person might share, “Hitting rock bottom was the wake-up call I needed to seek help.”
  • A user might discuss their journey by saying, “I hit rock bottom multiple times before I finally got sober.”

24. On the nod

To be “on the nod” means to be in a state of drowsiness or semi-consciousness from drug use, particularly from opioids. It describes the nodding motion that some individuals make when they are under the influence of these substances.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He’s been on the nod all day, barely responsive.”
  • In a discussion about the effects of opioids, a person might mention, “The nod is a common side effect of using heroin.”
  • A user might share their experience by saying, “I remember being on the nod for hours, completely unaware of my surroundings.”

25. Spun out

To be “spun out” means to be in a state of extreme intoxication from methamphetamine. It describes the intense high and hyperactive behavior that can result from using this powerful stimulant.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s been up for days, completely spun out.”
  • In a conversation about drug addiction, a person might mention, “I’ve seen what meth can do to people, and it’s terrifying when they’re spun out.”
  • A user might share their personal struggle by saying, “I used to be spun out all the time, but I’ve been clean for six months now.”

26. Wasted

This term is often used to describe being extremely intoxicated or under the influence of drugs or alcohol.

  • For example, “After a night of heavy drinking, he was completely wasted.”
  • In a conversation about partying, someone might say, “Let’s get wasted tonight!”
  • A person describing their wild night might say, “We were all wasted and dancing until sunrise.”

27. Blasted

This slang term refers to being extremely high or intoxicated, often from drug use.

  • For instance, “He smoked so much weed that he was completely blasted.”
  • In a discussion about partying, someone might say, “I got blasted last night and don’t remember anything.”
  • A person describing their experience with drugs might say, “I took a pill and felt completely blasted.”

28. Zonked

Being “zonked” means being heavily under the influence of drugs or alcohol, to the point of feeling dazed or out of it.

  • For example, “After taking that strong dose of medication, I felt completely zonked.”
  • In a conversation about partying, someone might say, “I got zonked on tequila last night.”
  • A person describing their experience with drugs might say, “I took a hit of acid and felt completely zonked.”

29. Geeked up

This term refers to being high on stimulants, particularly methamphetamine. It can also mean being overly excited or hyped up.

  • For instance, “He was geeked up on meth and couldn’t sit still.”
  • In a discussion about drug use, someone might say, “I used to get geeked up on speed all the time.”
  • A person describing their experience with stimulants might say, “I took some Adderall and felt really geeked up.”

30. Bent

Being “bent” refers to being under the influence of drugs, particularly opioids. It can also mean being in a state of intoxication or being physically and mentally impaired.

  • For example, “After taking those painkillers, he was completely bent.”
  • In a conversation about drug use, someone might say, “I used to get bent on heroin.”
  • A person describing their experience with opioids might say, “I took some oxycodone and felt really bent.”

31. Buzzed

This term is often used to describe a state of mild intoxication, usually from alcohol or drugs. When someone is buzzed, they may feel a slight euphoria or relaxation.

  • For example, “After a few drinks, I started feeling buzzed.”
  • A person might say, “I prefer to have a few beers and get buzzed rather than getting drunk.”
  • In a social setting, someone might ask, “Are you feeling buzzed yet?”

32. Faded

This term is commonly used to describe a state of being under the influence of drugs or alcohol. When someone is faded, they may feel a strong euphoria or altered perception.

  • For instance, “After smoking that joint, I was completely faded.”
  • A person might say, “I don’t remember much from last night, I was too faded.”
  • In a party setting, someone might ask, “Are you feeling faded yet?”

33. Jonezing

This term is often used to describe a strong craving or desire for a substance, typically drugs. When someone is jonezing, they may experience restlessness, irritability, and a strong urge to use.

  • For example, “I’ve been clean for a week, but I’m jonezing for a hit.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t stop thinking about drugs, I’m jonezing so bad.”
  • In a support group, someone might share, “I had a tough day and I’m really jonezing right now.”

34. Nodding off

This term is often used to describe the drowsiness or sedation associated with drug use, particularly opioids. When someone is nodding off, they may appear to be falling asleep or struggling to stay awake.

  • For instance, “After taking those painkillers, I kept nodding off.”
  • A person might say, “I was so high, I couldn’t stop nodding off.”
  • In a conversation about drug effects, someone might mention, “Nodding off is a common side effect of opioid use.”

35. Spaced out

This term is commonly used to describe a state of being mentally absent or disoriented. When someone is spaced out, they may appear to be daydreaming or have difficulty focusing.

  • For example, “I didn’t sleep well last night, so I’ve been feeling spaced out all day.”
  • A person might say, “I took some strong medication and now I feel completely spaced out.”
  • In a discussion about drug effects, someone might mention, “Certain substances can make you feel spaced out and detached from reality.”

36. Tripping

To be in a state of altered perception or consciousness due to the use of drugs or hallucinogens. It can refer to both positive and negative experiences.

  • For example, “I took some acid and now I’m tripping.”
  • A person might say, “I had a bad trip last night and it was really scary.”
  • In a conversation about drug experiences, someone might ask, “Have you ever tripped on mushrooms?”

37. Dope sick

To be in a state of physical and psychological distress due to the absence or reduction of drugs in the body. It is commonly associated with opioid addiction.

  • For instance, “I haven’t had my fix in days and I’m feeling dope sick.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t function when I’m dope sick, the withdrawal symptoms are unbearable.”
  • In a discussion about addiction, someone might ask, “How long does it take to get over being dope sick?”

38. Lit up

To be intoxicated or high from the use of drugs or alcohol. It can refer to a state of euphoria or intense stimulation.

  • For example, “I got so lit up at the party last night, I don’t remember anything.”
  • A person might say, “Let’s get lit up and have a great time!”
  • In a conversation about substance abuse, someone might ask, “Do you ever feel guilty after getting lit up?”

39. Blitzed

To be in a state of extreme intoxication or drug-induced euphoria. It implies a complete loss of control and inhibition.

  • For instance, “I drank way too much last night, I was absolutely blitzed.”
  • A person might say, “I took some ecstasy and got completely blitzed at the music festival.”
  • In a discussion about partying, someone might ask, “Have you ever seen someone get completely blitzed?”

40. Strung

To be physically or psychologically dependent on drugs, often used to describe a state of addiction. It can also refer to being in an agitated or nervous state.

  • For example, “He’s been strung out on heroin for years.”
  • A person might say, “I’m worried about my friend, he’s strung and needs help.”
  • In a conversation about the impact of drugs, someone might ask, “Have you seen the effects of long-term strung use?”

41. Doped up

To be “doped up” means to be heavily under the influence of drugs, often to the point of being incapacitated or in a haze. This term is typically used to describe someone who is high on drugs.

  • For example, “He was so doped up that he couldn’t even stand.”
  • A person might say, “I saw him stumbling down the street, completely doped up.”
  • In a conversation about drug addiction, someone might mention, “She’s been doped up for years and can’t seem to get clean.”

42. Juked

In the context of addiction, “juked” refers to being deceived or tricked into using drugs or getting a lower-quality substance than expected. It can also refer to being manipulated or taken advantage of by someone in the drug scene.

  • For instance, “He thought he was buying cocaine, but he got juked with baking soda.”
  • A person might say, “I got juked by my dealer and ended up with a fake pill.”
  • In a discussion about the dangers of addiction, someone might mention, “People in the drug world will do anything to juke you and get your money.”
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