Top 50 Slang For Adding – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to social media, staying up-to-date with the latest lingo is key to fitting in and understanding conversations. “Slang for adding” is no exception. Whether you’re new to the scene or a seasoned pro, our team has got you covered with a list of the trendiest terms to help you level up your social media game. Get ready to up your social media slang game with our comprehensive guide!

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1. Tack on

This phrase means to add something additional or extra to something that already exists or has been planned. It is often used when referring to additional costs or fees.

  • For example, “The airline tacked on an extra fee for checked baggage.”
  • In a discussion about a project, someone might say, “We need to tack on an extra week to meet the deadline.”
  • A person might complain, “They always tack on hidden charges at the end.”

2. Throw in

This phrase means to add something as a bonus or extra, often without any additional cost. It can also imply adding something unexpectedly.

  • For instance, “If you buy this product, they will throw in a free gift.”
  • A salesperson might say, “If you purchase today, I’ll throw in an extra discount.”
  • A person might say, “I decided to throw in a few extra toppings on the pizza.”

3. Append

This term means to add something at the end of a document, text, or list. It is commonly used in computer programming and data processing.

  • For example, “You can append your signature at the end of the email.”
  • In a discussion about file organization, someone might say, “Make sure to append the new data to the existing spreadsheet.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you please append the latest updates to the report?”

4. Tag on

This phrase means to add something as an afterthought or additional information, often at the end of a statement or conversation.

  • For instance, “Oh, and I almost forgot to tag on that we need more supplies.”
  • In a discussion about a party, someone might say, “We should tag on a few more decorations to make it festive.”
  • A person might add, “Before we end the meeting, let me tag on a quick announcement.”

5. Include

This term means to add something as part of a whole or group. It implies that the item or information is already part of the larger entity.

  • For example, “The package includes a free gift.”
  • In a discussion about a menu, someone might say, “The price includes a drink and dessert.”
  • A person might ask, “Does the price of the ticket include parking?”

6. Slip in

To “slip in” means to insert something casually or discreetly. It is often used when adding a comment or statement to a conversation or discussion without drawing too much attention to it.

  • For example, in a meeting, someone might say, “I just wanted to slip in here that we have a new project deadline.”
  • When sharing a story, a person might slip in a funny anecdote by saying, “Oh, by the way, let me slip in this hilarious thing that happened to me.”
  • In a group conversation, someone might slip in a suggestion by saying, “Can I just slip in a quick idea?”

7. Integrate

To “integrate” means to combine or merge something into a larger whole. It is often used when adding or incorporating different elements or components to create a cohesive unit.

  • For instance, in a software development project, a programmer might say, “We need to integrate this new feature into the existing codebase.”
  • When discussing a company merger, someone might mention, “We are working to integrate the two organizations and align their processes.”
  • In a cooking recipe, a chef might instruct, “Integrate the dry ingredients into the wet mixture slowly.”

8. Infuse

To “infuse” means to add flavor or a particular quality to something. It is often used when adding a specific taste or characteristic to food or drinks, but can also be used metaphorically to describe adding something to a situation or experience.

  • For example, in a cooking recipe, a chef might say, “Infuse the olive oil with garlic by heating it gently.”
  • When discussing a team-building exercise, someone might suggest, “Let’s infuse some fun activities into the training session to keep everyone engaged.”
  • In a creative writing workshop, a teacher might advise, “Infuse your story with vivid descriptions to bring the setting to life.”

9. Incorporate

To “incorporate” means to include or blend something into a larger whole. It is often used when adding or combining different elements or ideas to create a unified entity.

  • For instance, in a business presentation, a speaker might say, “We need to incorporate customer feedback into our product development process.”
  • When discussing a design project, someone might suggest, “Let’s incorporate elements of nature into the overall aesthetic.”
  • In a group brainstorming session, a team member might propose, “We should incorporate these innovative ideas into our marketing strategy.”

10. Inflict

To “inflict” means to impose or cause harm or suffering on someone or something. It is often used when describing the act of adding or imposing something negative or undesirable.

  • For example, in a debate, one person might say, “Your policies would inflict unnecessary financial burden on working families.”
  • When discussing the consequences of a decision, someone might warn, “This action could inflict long-term damage to our reputation.”
  • In a self-defense class, an instructor might explain, “The goal is to disable the attacker without inflicting serious injury.”

11. Inject

To add or introduce something forcefully or abruptly. The term “inject” is often used metaphorically to describe the act of adding or incorporating an element into a situation or context.

  • For instance, in a conversation about creativity, someone might say, “We need to inject some fresh ideas into this project.”
  • In a discussion about improving a business, a consultant might suggest, “We should inject new marketing strategies to attract more customers.”
  • A sports commentator might describe a player’s impact by saying, “She injected energy and enthusiasm into the team.”

12. Infest

To invade or spread in large numbers, often with negative connotations. The term “infest” is typically used to describe the act of adding or introducing an undesirable or harmful element.

  • For example, in a discussion about pest control, someone might say, “Our house is infested with ants.”
  • In a conversation about social media, a user might complain, “My timeline is infested with annoying ads.”
  • A person discussing a problem in their community might state, “The neighborhood is infested with crime.”

13. Implant

To insert or place something firmly or permanently into a particular position or context. The term “implant” is often used metaphorically to describe the act of adding or incorporating an idea, belief, or concept.

  • For instance, in a discussion about technology, someone might say, “The microchip is implanted under the skin.”
  • In a conversation about education, a teacher might explain, “We need to implant a love for learning in our students.”
  • A motivational speaker might encourage their audience by saying, “You have the power to implant positive thoughts in your mind.”

14. Inflect

To change or alter the form, tone, or emphasis of something. The term “inflect” is often used to describe the act of adding or incorporating a different variation or expression.

  • For example, in a discussion about language, someone might say, “You can inflect your voice to convey different emotions.”
  • In a conversation about music, a musician might explain, “The way you inflect your notes can create different moods.”
  • A person discussing acting techniques might state, “Inflecting your speech can help bring a character to life.”

15. Instill

To gradually and firmly establish an idea, belief, or quality in someone’s mind or character. The term “instill” is often used to describe the act of adding or incorporating a certain trait or value.

  • For instance, in a discussion about parenting, someone might say, “It’s important to instill good manners in children.”
  • In a conversation about leadership, a manager might explain, “I want to instill a sense of accountability in my team.”
  • A mentor might advise their mentee by saying, “I will instill confidence in you through guidance and support.”

16. Interject

To interrupt a conversation or discussion with a sudden remark or comment. “Interject” is often used when someone wants to add their input or opinion to a conversation.

  • For example, during a meeting, someone might interject, “I have an idea that could solve this problem.”
  • In a heated argument, a person might interject, “Can I just say something?”
  • During a presentation, an audience member might interject, “I have a question about this point.”

17. Inscribe

To write or carve words or symbols onto a surface. “Inscribe” is often used when adding a permanent or significant mark to an object.

  • For instance, a person might inscribe their initials on a piece of jewelry.
  • When signing a book, an author might inscribe a personal message to the reader.
  • A historical artifact might have inscriptions that provide information about its origins.
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18. Input

To provide information, ideas, or suggestions to a discussion or project. “Input” is often used when someone wants to add their thoughts or contribute to a group effort.

  • For example, during a brainstorming session, someone might provide input on potential ideas.
  • In a team meeting, a member might offer input on how to improve a process.
  • When working on a collaborative document, individuals can provide input by editing and adding their thoughts.

19. Inset

To add something into a larger whole or context. “Inset” is often used when adding a smaller element or detail within a larger structure.

  • For instance, a designer might inset a small image or graphic into a larger layout.
  • In a presentation, a speaker might inset a relevant quote or statistic on a slide.
  • When creating a document, a writer might inset a table or chart to provide additional information.

20. Interpose

To insert oneself or one’s opinion into a conversation or situation. “Interpose” is often used when someone wants to add their perspective or mediate a discussion.

  • For example, in a debate, a moderator might interpose to keep the conversation on track.
  • During an argument, a friend might interpose to calm down the participants.
  • In a negotiation, a mediator might interpose to find a compromise.

21. Toss in

This phrase means to add something casually or without much thought. It implies a quick and effortless addition of an item or ingredient.

  • For example, when cooking, you might say, “Just toss in some salt and pepper.”
  • In a conversation about a group project, you could suggest, “Let’s toss in some ideas for the presentation.”
  • Someone might ask, “Can you toss in a few extra dollars for gas?”

22. Mix in

This slang phrase means to combine or blend something with another substance or element.

  • For instance, in a recipe, you might be instructed to “Mix in the flour slowly.”
  • When discussing a team strategy, you could say, “Let’s mix in some new plays to keep the opponents guessing.”
  • A bartender might ask, “Do you want me to mix in some fruit juice with your cocktail?”

23. Pop in

This slang term means to put something into a place or object quickly or suddenly.

  • For example, when baking, you might be instructed to “Pop in the cake into the oven.”
  • In a conversation about a movie night, someone might suggest, “Let’s pop in a comedy for some laughs.”
  • A friend might say, “I’ll just pop in for a quick visit.”

24. Stick in

This phrase means to insert or put something into a particular position or location.

  • For instance, when assembling furniture, you might be instructed to “Stick in the screws to secure the pieces.”
  • When talking about decorating a room, someone might suggest, “Let’s stick in a few plants for some greenery.”
  • A teacher might say, “Please stick in your completed assignments into the designated folder.”

25. Plug in

This slang term means to connect or attach something to a power source or a device.

  • For example, when setting up a computer, you might be instructed to “Plug in the power cord.”
  • In a conversation about charging a phone, someone might say, “I need to plug in my phone, it’s almost out of battery.”
  • A presenter might ask, “Can someone please plug in the projector for the presentation?”

26. Jab in

This phrase is used to describe the act of inserting something quickly and forcefully, often in a tight or limited space.

  • For example, “I had to jab in my key to open the jammed lock.”
  • In a crowded train, someone might say, “Excuse me, can I jab in here?”
  • A person trying to fit a large package into a small box might say, “I’ll have to jab it in to make it fit.”

27. Load in

This term is used to describe the action of putting or placing something into a container or space.

  • For instance, “I need to load in the groceries into the car.”
  • When moving furniture, someone might say, “Let’s load in the couch first.”
  • A person preparing for a trip might say, “I’ll load in my suitcase with all the necessary items.”

28. Wedge in

This phrase refers to the act of inserting something in a tight or narrow space, often with the intention of securing or fitting it in place.

  • For example, “I had to wedge in the last piece of the puzzle.”
  • In a crowded elevator, someone might say, “Let’s wedge in a few more people before the doors close.”
  • A person trying to fit a large book on a shelf might say, “I’ll have to wedge it in between these other books.”

29. Squeeze in

This term is used to describe the act of fitting or inserting something into a space that is too small or limited.

  • For instance, “I managed to squeeze in a quick workout before work.”
  • In a crowded restaurant, someone might say, “Can we squeeze in one more person at this table?”
  • A person trying to park in a tight spot might say, “I’ll have to squeeze in between these two cars.”

30. Slot in

This phrase is used to describe the act of inserting something into a specific or designated place.

  • For example, “I need to slot in the memory card into the camera.”
  • When organizing files, someone might say, “Let’s slot in these documents into the appropriate folders.”
  • A person assembling furniture might say, “I’ll slot in the shelves into the bookcase.”

31. Push in

To add or include something into a particular space or group. “Push in” is often used to describe physically inserting an object, but can also be used metaphorically.

  • For example, when setting up a tent, someone might say, “Push in the pegs firmly to secure the tent.”
  • In a meeting, a participant might suggest, “Let’s push in that agenda item for discussion.”
  • When adding a new element to a recipe, a chef might say, “Push in a pinch of salt for added flavor.”

32. Fit in

To add or incorporate something into a particular group or situation in a way that is harmonious or seamless. “Fit in” implies finding a place or role that complements the existing elements.

  • For instance, when joining a new social group, someone might say, “I’m trying to fit in and make friends.”
  • In a team project, a member might suggest, “Let’s brainstorm ideas that fit in with the overall theme.”
  • When adding a new feature to a product, a designer might aim to “fit it in” with the existing design aesthetic.
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33. Work in

To add or include something into a particular context or situation. “Work in” implies finding a way to integrate or make something fit smoothly.

  • For example, during a presentation, a speaker might say, “I’ll work in some examples to illustrate my point.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “Let me work in a quick comment before we move on.”
  • When adding a new exercise to a workout routine, a trainer might advise, “Try to work it in between sets for maximum efficiency.”

34. Annex

To add or attach something as an extension or supplementary part. “Annex” often implies incorporating a new area or territory into an existing structure.

  • For instance, when expanding a house, someone might say, “We decided to annex an extra room for guests.”
  • In a business context, a company might announce, “We’re planning to annex a new department to enhance our services.”
  • When adding an appendix to a report, a writer might label it as “Annex A” for easy reference.

35. Attach

To add or fasten something to another object or entity. “Attach” implies physically connecting or linking two things together.

  • For example, when sending an email, a person might say, “I’ll attach the document for your reference.”
  • In a DIY project, someone might say, “Make sure to attach the pieces securely with screws.”
  • When adding a file to a digital folder, a user might click on “Attach” to include it.

36. Affix

To attach or fasten something to another object. “Affix” is often used to describe the act of adding a prefix or suffix to a word.

  • For example, “Affix the stamp to the envelope before mailing it.”
  • In linguistics, a scholar might say, “The prefix ‘un-‘ affixes to the word ‘happy’ to create ‘unhappy’.”
  • A teacher might explain, “When you add the suffix ‘-er’ to the word ‘teach’, it becomes ‘teacher’.”

37. Blend in

To become part of a group or community by adapting to their customs and habits. “Blend in” is often used to describe the act of fitting in or not standing out.

  • For instance, a new student might be advised, “Try to blend in with your classmates by participating in activities.”
  • In a discussion about fashion, someone might say, “I like to wear neutral colors so I can blend in with any crowd.”
  • A traveler might offer the tip, “When visiting a foreign country, it’s important to learn about local customs and try to blend in.”

38. Fuse

To join or unite two or more things together to form a single entity. “Fuse” is often used to describe the act of merging or blending.

  • For example, “Fuse the ingredients together to create a delicious smoothie.”
  • In a discussion about music, someone might say, “The band fuses elements of rock and jazz to create a unique sound.”
  • A chef might explain, “Fusing different culinary traditions can result in innovative and exciting dishes.”

39. Join in

To take part in an activity or event. “Join in” is often used to describe the act of becoming involved or contributing.

  • For instance, a teacher might say, “Don’t be shy, join in the class discussion.”
  • In a conversation about a charity event, someone might ask, “Are you going to join in and help out?”
  • A friend might invite, “Come on, join in the game with us!”

40. Adjoin

To be next to or share a boundary with something. “Adjoin” is often used to describe the act of being adjacent or attached.

  • For example, “The living room adjoins the kitchen, creating an open floor plan.”
  • In a real estate listing, a description might read, “This property adjoins a beautiful park.”
  • A homeowner might explain, “Our backyard adjoins the neighbor’s yard, creating a sense of spaciousness.”

41. Embed

To include or integrate something within another thing. “Embed” is often used to describe the process of inserting media, such as videos or images, into a website or document.

  • For example, a web developer might say, “I need to embed this YouTube video into the webpage.”
  • In a discussion about social media, one might ask, “How do I embed a tweet into my blog post?”
  • A journalist might write, “The article embedded a link to a related news story.”

42. Insert

To place something inside or within another thing. “Insert” is a term commonly used when adding an object or information into a specific location.

  • For instance, a teacher might instruct their students, “Insert your completed worksheets into the designated folder.”
  • In a conversation about writing, one might say, “I need to insert a quote to support my argument.”
  • A computer user might ask, “How do I insert a hyperlink into a Word document?”

43. Introduce

To bring something new or unfamiliar into a situation or group. “Introduce” often refers to the act of bringing a person or concept to the attention of others.

  • For example, a host might say, “Allow me to introduce our guest speaker for tonight.”
  • In a social setting, one might say, “Let me introduce you to my friend, Sarah.”
  • A teacher might introduce a new topic by saying, “Today, we will be introducing the concept of fractions.”

44. Add on

To include or attach something additional to an existing thing. “Add on” is often used when referring to adding extra features or components to a pre-existing item or system.

  • For instance, a homeowner might say, “We decided to add on a new room to our house.”
  • In a software context, one might ask, “Can I add on additional modules to this program?”
  • A customer might request, “Can you add on extra toppings to my pizza?”

45. Add up

To perform a mathematical operation to determine the total or sum of a set of numbers or values. “Add up” is commonly used when referring to the process of adding numbers together.

  • For example, a student might say, “I need to add up these numbers to solve the math problem.”
  • In a financial context, one might say, “Let’s add up our expenses to see how much we spent.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you help me add up these receipts to balance my budget?”

46. Add in

This term is used to indicate including something in a particular context or situation.

  • For example, “Let’s add in some extra details to make the story more interesting.”
  • In a recipe, the instructions might say, “Add in the chopped vegetables.”
  • In a meeting, someone might suggest, “We should add in a section about customer feedback.”

47. Add together

This phrase is used to indicate combining or totaling two or more things.

  • For instance, “Let’s add together the numbers to find the sum.”
  • In a math problem, a student might be asked to “Add together the values of x and y.”
  • In a cooking recipe, the instructions might say, “Add together the flour and sugar.”

48. Add on to

This term is used to indicate extending or increasing something that already exists.

  • For example, “Let’s add on to the house to create more living space.”
  • In a discussion about a project, someone might suggest, “We should add on to the existing features to enhance functionality.”
  • In a retail store, a salesperson might say, “You can add on additional accessories to enhance your purchase.”

49. Add to

This phrase is used to indicate contributing or enhancing something.

  • For instance, “Your hard work will add to the success of the team.”
  • In a brainstorming session, someone might say, “Let’s add to the list of ideas.”
  • In a conversation, a person might add to a discussion by saying, “I’d like to add to what was previously mentioned.”

50. Add up to

This term is used to indicate the total or sum of something.

  • For example, “The costs add up to a significant amount.”
  • In a financial statement, a person might say, “Let’s add up the expenses and calculate the total.”
  • In a shopping scenario, a customer might think, “The items in my cart add up to more than I expected.”