Top 56 Slang For Additional – Meaning & Usage

In a world where language is constantly evolving, it’s important to stay up-to-date with the latest slang. Whether you’re trying to impress your friends or simply want to keep in the loop, we’ve got you covered with our list of top slang for additional. From trendy phrases to popular expressions, we’ve compiled a comprehensive guide that will have you speaking the language of the cool kids in no time. So, why wait? Let’s dive in and expand your vocabulary with these hip and happening words!

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1. Extra

This word is used to describe something that is added on or beyond what is expected or necessary. It can also be used to emphasize the quantity or quality of something.

  • For example, “Can I get some extra cheese on my pizza?”
  • In a conversation about a concert, someone might say, “The band played an extra song as an encore.”
  • A person might comment on a generous tip by saying, “They left an extra $20 for the server.”

2. Added

This word is used to indicate something that has been included or put in addition to something else. It can also be used to describe an increase or enhancement in a particular aspect.

  • For instance, “The added features in the new smartphone make it worth the upgrade.”
  • In a recipe, someone might say, “You can add some herbs and spices for added flavor.”
  • A person might mention, “The added bonus of this job is the flexible schedule.”

3. Further

This word is used to indicate something that goes beyond what has already been done or discussed. It can also be used to describe something that is more advanced or in-depth.

  • For example, “We need to further investigate the issue to find a solution.”
  • In a conversation about education, someone might say, “I want to pursue further studies in my field.”
  • A person might comment on a report by saying, “The further analysis revealed some interesting insights.”

4. More

This word is used to indicate a greater quantity or degree of something. It can also be used to express a desire or request for an increased amount or level.

  • For instance, “I need more time to finish the project.”
  • In a discussion about food, someone might say, “I want more of that delicious dessert.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you give me more information about the event?”

5. New

This word is used to describe something that is recently made, discovered, or introduced. It can also be used to suggest a change or replacement from something old or existing.

  • For example, “I bought a new car yesterday.”
  • In a conversation about technology, someone might say, “Have you seen the new smartphone model?”
  • A person might comment on a job opportunity by saying, “I’m excited for a new start in my career.”

6. Other

This term refers to something that is not the main or primary thing being discussed or considered. It can also be used to indicate something additional or extra.

  • For example, “I have a lot of books, but this one is my favorite. The other ones are good too.”
  • In a group of friends planning a trip, someone might say, “We need to decide on the main destination first, and then we can discuss any other places we want to visit.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have any other suggestions for dinner? I’m open to trying something new.”

7. Over and above

This phrase is used to describe something that is more than what is expected or required. It implies going the extra mile or exceeding a certain standard.

  • For instance, “She always goes over and above in her work, which is why she’s so successful.”
  • In a discussion about customer service, someone might say, “Providing exceptional service means going over and above for the customer.”
  • A teacher might praise a student by saying, “Your dedication to your studies is evident. You consistently go over and above what is asked of you.”

8. Padding

This term is used to describe something that is added to make something else seem more substantial or impressive, but is often unnecessary or excessive.

  • For example, “The report had a lot of padding to make it look longer, but it didn’t add any real value.”
  • In a conversation about a resume, someone might say, “It’s important to be honest and not include any padding to make yourself seem more qualified.”
  • A person might comment on a movie, saying, “The film was good overall, but there was some unnecessary padding in the middle that dragged the story.”

9. Spare

This term refers to something that is kept in reserve or held back for use when needed. It can also mean having more than what is necessary or required.

  • For instance, “I always keep a spare set of keys in case I lose the original.”
  • In a discussion about cooking, someone might say, “I always keep spare ingredients on hand in case I need to make a last-minute substitution.”
  • A person might offer, “If you need a spare pen, I have plenty. Just let me know.”

10. Supplementary

This term describes something that is added to provide more information or to enhance or complete something else. It can also refer to something that is extra or additional.

  • For example, “The textbook includes a supplementary chapter with additional practice exercises.”
  • In a conversation about a presentation, someone might say, “I’ll send you the supplementary materials so you can review them before the meeting.”
  • A teacher might explain, “The supplementary reading materials will help you gain a deeper understanding of the topic.”

11. Bonus

Something given or received in addition to what is expected. A bonus is often a reward or incentive for good performance or as a special addition to a purchase or deal.

  • For example, “As a bonus, you will also receive a free gift with your purchase.”
  • In a work context, a manager might say, “Great job on the project! As a bonus, you will receive a cash reward.”
  • A sports commentator might exclaim, “He scored a goal in the final seconds! What a bonus for the team!”

12. Plus

Used to indicate that something is being added or included. “Plus” is often used in mathematical equations or to emphasize an additional benefit or advantage.

  • For instance, “2 plus 2 equals 4.”
  • In a sales pitch, a salesperson might say, “Buy one, get one free, plus free shipping!”
  • A person discussing the benefits of a gym membership might say, “Plus, you’ll have access to a variety of fitness classes.”

13. Surplus

Refers to an amount or quantity that is greater than what is needed or used. A surplus can be seen as an additional or extra amount beyond what is required.

  • For example, “The company had a surplus of inventory, so they held a clearance sale.”
  • In a discussion about food production, one might say, “A surplus of crops can lead to lower prices for consumers.”
  • A person talking about personal finances might say, “I’m trying to save money by cutting down on unnecessary spending and building a surplus.”

14. Surcharge

An additional charge or fee added on top of the regular price or cost of something. A surcharge is often applied to cover additional costs or expenses.

  • For instance, “There is a surcharge for using a credit card to pay.”
  • When discussing airline travel, someone might say, “Be aware of any baggage surcharges before booking your flight.”
  • A person talking about hotel stays might warn, “Watch out for hidden surcharges, such as resort fees, when booking accommodations.”

15. Incremental

Refers to something that increases or progresses in small or gradual steps. Incremental is often used to describe a process or change that occurs in small increments or additions.

  • For example, “The project is moving forward with incremental improvements.”
  • In a discussion about salary raises, someone might say, “Employees can expect incremental increases based on performance.”
  • A person discussing personal growth might say, “I’m taking incremental steps towards achieving my goals.”

16. Surplusage

This term refers to something that is extra or unnecessary, beyond what is needed or required. It is often used to describe something that is surplus or superfluous.

  • For example, “The company had to cut back on surplusage to reduce costs.”
  • In a discussion about minimalism, someone might say, “I’m trying to eliminate surplusage and simplify my life.”
  • A person might complain, “The instructions come with a lot of surplusage that is confusing.”

17. Accessory

An accessory refers to something that is added to enhance or complement something else. It can refer to a secondary or supplementary item that accompanies a main object.

  • For instance, “She bought a new phone case as an accessory to her smartphone.”
  • In a discussion about fashion, someone might say, “Accessories can really elevate a basic outfit.”
  • A person might comment, “I love how this necklace serves as the perfect accessory to complete the look.”

18. Increment

An increment is a small increase or addition to something. It can refer to a gradual or incremental change or progress.

  • For example, “The price of the product increased by small increments over time.”
  • In a discussion about salary negotiations, someone might say, “I’m hoping for a significant increment in my pay.”
  • A person might note, “Every little increment of progress counts towards achieving your goals.”

19. Complementary

Complementary refers to something that completes or enhances something else. It is often used to describe things that go well together or provide a balance or contrast.

  • For instance, “The flavors of the dish were perfectly complementary.”
  • In a discussion about teamwork, someone might say, “Each team member has complementary skills that contribute to our success.”
  • A person might comment, “The colors of the artwork create a complementary contrast.”

20. Augmented

Augmented means to make something greater or to enhance it by adding or increasing its value or quality.

  • For example, “The new software features an augmented reality experience.”
  • In a discussion about technology, someone might say, “Virtual reality has the potential to augment various industries.”
  • A person might note, “The company’s revenue was augmented by the introduction of a new product.”

21. Added on

This term refers to something that is included or appended to something else.

  • For example, “I ordered a pizza with extra cheese and pepperoni added on.”
  • In a discussion about a project, someone might suggest, “We should have an added on section for additional information.”
  • A person might comment on a social media post, “I love the added on bonus content in this video.”

22. Increased

This word indicates that something has been raised, enhanced, or improved.

  • For instance, “The company increased the salary of its employees.”
  • In a conversation about fitness, someone might say, “I’ve increased my weightlifting routine to build more muscle.”
  • A person might mention, “The increased demand for the product led to higher production.”

23. Fresh

This slang term refers to something that is new, recent, or just arrived.

  • For example, “I bought a fresh pair of sneakers.”
  • In a discussion about music, someone might say, “Have you heard the fresh new album by that artist?”
  • A person might comment on a fashion post, “I love your fresh style!”

24. Excess

This word refers to something that is more than what is needed or expected.

  • For instance, “There was an excess of food at the party.”
  • In a conversation about spending, someone might say, “I need to cut back and avoid excess expenses.”
  • A person might comment on a buffet, “The variety of dishes is overwhelming, there’s an excess of choices!”

25. Supplemental

This term indicates something that is provided in addition to what is already available or existing.

  • For example, “I take a supplemental vitamin to boost my immune system.”
  • In a discussion about education, someone might suggest, “We should offer supplemental materials for students who want to learn more.”
  • A person might comment on a news article, “The supplemental information in this article provides more context and depth.”

26. Another

This word is used to indicate an additional item or person.

  • For example, “Can I have another slice of pizza?”
  • In a conversation about books, someone might say, “I just finished one novel, and now I’m starting another.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have another pen I can borrow?”

27. Further to

This phrase is used to introduce additional information or actions.

  • For instance, “Further to our previous discussion, we have decided to implement the new policy.”
  • In a business email, one might write, “Further to our meeting, please find attached the updated proposal.”
  • A person might say, “Further to your request, we have extended the deadline.”

28. More than

This phrase is used to indicate a larger quantity or amount.

  • For example, “I have more than enough money to buy a new car.”
  • In a conversation about food, one might say, “I ate more than I should have.”
  • A person might exclaim, “That movie was more than I expected!”

29. Extraordinary

This word is used to describe something that is beyond what is ordinary or usual.

  • For instance, “The acrobat’s performance was truly extraordinary.”
  • In a discussion about achievements, one might say, “She has accomplished something extraordinary.”
  • A person might describe a sunset as “an extraordinary display of colors.”
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30. Additional to

This phrase is used to indicate something that is added or included.

  • For example, “Additional to the main course, we also offer a vegetarian option.”
  • In a conversation about benefits, one might say, “In addition to the salary, there are also additional perks.”
  • A person might mention, “Additional to the regular schedule, there will be a special event next week.”

31. Supplementary to

This phrase is used to indicate something that adds to or complements something else. It is often used to provide extra information or support.

  • For example, “Supplementary to my previous point, I would also like to mention…”
  • In a discussion about a research paper, someone might say, “This study provides supplementary evidence to support our hypothesis.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “You can find supplementary materials for this lesson on our class website.”

32. Further to that

This phrase is used to introduce additional information or ideas that expand on a previous statement or topic. It is often used to provide more details or to continue a discussion.

  • For instance, “Further to that, I would like to address the issue of funding.”
  • In a business meeting, someone might say, “Further to that point, we should also consider the impact on our budget.”
  • A presenter might use this phrase to transition between slides or topics, saying, “Now, further to that, let’s move on to the next section.”

33. Furtherance

This term refers to the act of promoting or advancing something, typically a cause or goal. It implies taking actions to make progress or to bring about a desired outcome.

  • For example, “The organization is dedicated to the furtherance of human rights.”
  • In a discussion about career development, someone might say, “Continuing education is essential for the furtherance of your professional goals.”
  • A motivational speaker might say, “Believe in yourself and take steps towards the furtherance of your dreams.”

34. On top of

This phrase is used to indicate that something is being added to an existing situation or amount. It implies that there is already a certain level or quantity, and something is being added on top of it.

  • For instance, “On top of my regular workload, I also have to attend meetings.”
  • In a conversation about expenses, someone might say, “On top of rent, I also have to pay utilities.”
  • A parent might say to their child, “On top of your chores, can you also walk the dog?”

35. In excess of

This phrase is used to indicate that a quantity or amount is greater than a specified number or limit. It suggests that there is an abundance or surplus.

  • For example, “The company reported profits in excess of $1 million.”
  • In a discussion about speed limits, someone might say, “Driving in excess of the posted limit is against the law.”
  • A news headline might read, “Temperatures soar in excess of 100 degrees.”

36. Appendage

An appendage refers to an additional part or limb attached to the body. It can also be used metaphorically to describe something that is added to enhance or extend something else.

  • For example, “The octopus has eight tentacle appendages.”
  • In a discussion about technology, one might say, “The new feature is like an appendage to the existing software.”
  • A person talking about personal style might comment, “I like to add statement jewelry as an appendage to my outfits.”

37. Extension

An extension is something that extends or adds to something else, whether it be physical or metaphorical. It can refer to a physical lengthening or widening, or to a prolongation or expansion of time, space, or an idea.

  • For instance, “The extension cord allowed me to plug in my laptop from across the room.”
  • In a conversation about deadlines, one might say, “I need an extension on my project.”
  • A person discussing hair might comment, “I got hair extensions to add length and volume.”

38. Augmentation

Augmentation refers to the process of enhancing or improving something, often through the addition of extra elements or features. It can be used in various contexts, such as technology, body modification, or even ideas.

  • For example, “The new software update includes an augmentation of security features.”
  • In a discussion about cosmetic surgery, one might say, “She underwent breast augmentation to enhance her appearance.”
  • A person talking about their creative process might comment, “I use digital tools for augmentation of my illustrations.”

39. Upside

The upside refers to the advantage or positive aspect of a situation or decision. It is the opposite of the downside, which represents the disadvantages or negative aspects.

  • For instance, “The upside of working from home is the flexibility it offers.”
  • In a conversation about investments, one might say, “The upside potential of this stock is significant.”
  • A person discussing a difficult situation might comment, “The upside is that it taught me valuable life lessons.”

40. Boost

Boost refers to an increase or improvement in something, whether it be energy, performance, or morale. It can also be used as a verb to describe the action of enhancing or raising something.

  • For example, “Drinking coffee in the morning gives me a boost of energy.”
  • In a discussion about sales, one might say, “We need to boost our marketing efforts to increase revenue.”
  • A person talking about self-confidence might comment, “Wearing my favorite outfit always gives me a confidence boost.”

41. Gain

In this context, “gain” refers to an advantage or benefit that is obtained. It can also signify an increase in something, such as earnings or knowledge.

  • For example, “By studying abroad, students can gain valuable cultural experiences.”
  • In a business context, one might say, “Investing in new technology can help companies gain a competitive edge.”
  • A fitness enthusiast might exclaim, “I’ve been hitting the gym hard and starting to see some gains!”

42. Sweetener

In this context, “sweetener” refers to something that is added to make a deal or offer more attractive. It can also signify an extra incentive or benefit.

  • For instance, “The company offered a signing bonus as a sweetener to attract top talent.”
  • In a sales pitch, a representative might say, “As a sweetener, we’re throwing in a free accessory with your purchase.”
  • A real estate agent might advertise a property by saying, “The seller is offering a sweetener of covering the closing costs.”

43. Add-on

An “add-on” refers to an extra feature or component that can be added to something to enhance its functionality or capabilities. It can also signify an optional addition or upgrade.

  • For example, “The new smartphone model comes with several add-ons, such as a high-definition camera.”
  • In the context of software, a user might say, “I downloaded an add-on that improves my web browsing experience.”
  • A car enthusiast might discuss, “I’m considering purchasing an add-on exhaust system to improve the vehicle’s performance.”

44. Supplement

In this context, “supplement” refers to something that is added to enhance or complete something else. It can also signify an additional resource or support.

  • For instance, “Taking vitamin C supplements can help boost your immune system.”
  • In a discussion about education, one might say, “Textbooks are often supplemented with online resources.”
  • A person discussing their diet might mention, “I use protein shakes as a supplement to my regular meals.”

45. Additionally

“Additionally” is a word that is used to introduce an additional point or piece of information. It signifies that something is being added to what has already been stated.

  • For example, “The project was completed on time. Additionally, it received positive feedback from clients.”
  • In a presentation, a speaker might say, “We have achieved our sales targets. Additionally, we have expanded into new markets.”
  • A writer might use the word in an article, “The company’s profits have increased. Additionally, they have launched a new product line.”

46. Furthermore

This term is used to add more information or provide additional evidence to support a previous statement. It is often used to emphasize a point or to introduce a new perspective.

  • For example, “The study found that exercise improves mental health. Furthermore, it can also increase productivity.”
  • In a debate, someone might say, “The proposed policy will benefit the economy. Furthermore, it will also create jobs.”
  • A writer might use this word to transition to a new idea, such as, “The first reason to visit this city is its rich history. Furthermore, its vibrant arts scene is also worth exploring.”

47. Moreover

This term is used to introduce another point that supports or strengthens a previous statement. It is often used to highlight the significance of the additional information.

  • For instance, “The new smartphone has a longer battery life. Moreover, it also features an improved camera.”
  • In a persuasive essay, someone might argue, “This policy will protect the environment. Moreover, it will also create a sustainable future for generations to come.”
  • A speaker might use this term to emphasize the importance of an idea, saying, “Not only is this book entertaining, but, moreover, it also provides valuable life lessons.”

48. On top of that

This phrase is used to introduce an extra point or piece of information. It is often used to emphasize the added value or significance of the additional information.

  • For example, “The hotel offers free breakfast and Wi-Fi. On top of that, it also has a rooftop pool.”
  • In a conversation about job benefits, someone might say, “The company provides health insurance and paid time off. On top of that, employees also receive a yearly bonus.”
  • A presenter might use this phrase to make a strong point, saying, “This product is not only affordable but, on top of that, it also comes with a lifetime warranty.”

49. In addition

This phrase is used to introduce another point or piece of information that supports or enhances a previous statement. It is often used to indicate that something is being included along with what has already been mentioned.

  • For instance, “The restaurant has a wide menu selection. In addition, they also offer daily specials.”
  • In a discussion about travel destinations, someone might say, “The city has beautiful beaches and historical landmarks. In addition, it also boasts a vibrant nightlife.”
  • A writer might use this phrase to provide extra details, such as, “The study found that exercise improves physical health. In addition, it can also reduce the risk of chronic diseases.”

50. Also

This word is used to introduce an additional point or piece of information. It is often used to indicate that something is being included or added to what has already been mentioned.

  • For example, “The book is engaging and well-written. Also, it has received rave reviews from critics.”
  • In a conversation about hobbies, someone might say, “I enjoy painting and playing the guitar. Also, I recently started learning how to knit.”
  • A speaker might use this word to emphasize a secondary benefit, saying, “This new software not only saves time but also, it also improves efficiency.”

51. Likewise

This is a term used to express agreement or similarity with a previous statement or action. It indicates that the speaker feels the same way or has had a similar experience.

  • For example, if someone says, “I love pizza,” you might respond, “Likewise!”
  • In a conversation about favorite movies, one person might say, “I really enjoyed ‘Inception’,” and the other might reply, “Likewise, it’s one of my favorites too.”
  • If someone compliments your outfit, you could say, “Likewise, I love your style too!”

52. Too

This is a simple and versatile word that can be used to indicate inclusion or agreement. It means that the same thing applies to the person being addressed or referred to.

  • For instance, if someone says, “I’m going to the party,” you might respond, “Me too!”
  • In a discussion about favorite hobbies, one person might say, “I enjoy painting,” and the other might say, “Me too, it’s a great way to relax.”
  • If someone mentions that they are tired, you could say, “Too, I didn’t get much sleep last night.”

53. As well

This phrase is similar to “too” and can be used to indicate inclusion or agreement. It means that the same thing applies to the person being addressed or referred to.

  • For example, if someone says, “I’m going to the store,” you might respond, “I’ll come along as well.”
  • In a conversation about favorite books, one person might say, “I really enjoyed ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’,” and the other might say, “I did as well, it’s a classic.”
  • If someone mentions that they are busy, you could say, “I am as well, let’s catch up later.”

54. And

This is a simple conjunction that can be used to add another item or idea to a list or statement. It indicates that there is more to be included or considered.

  • For instance, if someone says, “I need to buy milk,” you might respond, “And bread too.”
  • In a discussion about favorite colors, one person might say, “I like blue,” and the other might say, “And green as well.”
  • If someone mentions that they have plans for the weekend, you could say, “And I have a birthday party to attend.”

55. Besides

This word is used to introduce an additional point or reason that is different from the main topic or focus. It suggests that there is something else to consider or take into account.

  • For example, if someone says, “I’m not feeling well,” you might respond, “Besides, it’s raining outside.”
  • In a conversation about favorite foods, one person might say, “I love pizza,” and the other might say, “Besides, I’m a big fan of sushi.”
  • If someone mentions that they have a busy schedule, you could say, “Besides, it’s important to find time for relaxation.”

56. Along with

This phrase is used to indicate that something is being added or included.

  • For example, “Along with the cake, we also served ice cream.”
  • A person might say, “I brought my laptop along with me to the meeting.”
  • In a sentence about a group of friends, one might say, “She invited me along with her other friends.”