Top 55 Slang For Advocating – Meaning & Usage

Advocating for causes you are passionate about is essential in today’s world, but navigating the language around it can be daunting. We’ve got you covered with a list of the top slang terms used in advocacy circles, so you can confidently join the conversation and make your voice heard. From “slacktivism” to “call to action,” we’ve compiled the must-know terms to help you become a more effective advocate. Get ready to level up your advocacy game with our comprehensive guide!

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1. Vouch for

To vouch for someone means to publicly support or endorse them, usually in a professional or personal context.

  • For example, a colleague might say, “I can vouch for John’s work ethic and reliability.”
  • In a job interview, a reference might vouch for the candidate’s qualifications by saying, “I’ve worked with Sarah for years and can vouch for her expertise.”
  • A friend might vouch for another friend’s character by saying, “I can vouch for Lisa’s honesty and loyalty.”

2. Root for

To root for someone means to cheer them on or show support for them, especially in a competitive or challenging situation.

  • For instance, a sports fan might say, “I always root for the home team.”
  • In a reality TV competition, a viewer might root for their favorite contestant by saying, “I’m rooting for Sarah to win the whole thing.”
  • A friend might root for another friend’s success by saying, “I’m rooting for you to get that promotion!”

3. Campaign for

To campaign for something means to actively advocate or promote it, usually with the goal of achieving a specific outcome or raising awareness.

  • For example, a political candidate might campaign for better healthcare by saying, “I’m running for office to campaign for affordable healthcare for all.”
  • An environmental activist might campaign for sustainable practices by organizing protests and awareness campaigns.
  • A nonprofit organization might campaign for donations by launching a fundraising campaign.

4. Fight for

To fight for something means to defend or support it, often in the face of opposition or adversity. It implies a strong dedication and willingness to take action.

  • For instance, a civil rights activist might fight for equal rights by participating in demonstrations and advocating for policy changes.
  • A parent might fight for their child’s education by attending school board meetings and advocating for better resources.
  • A social justice advocate might fight for systemic change by organizing protests and lobbying for policy reform.

5. Uphold

To uphold something means to maintain or support it, often in a legal or moral sense. It implies a commitment to the principles or values associated with the thing being upheld.

  • For example, a judge might uphold a law by ruling in favor of its constitutionality.
  • A teacher might uphold classroom rules by enforcing them consistently and fairly.
  • A person might uphold their personal values by making ethical choices in their daily life.

6. Endorse

To publicly express approval or support for a person, idea, or cause. It often involves giving a formal endorsement or recommendation.

  • For example, a politician might endorse a candidate by saying, “I fully endorse their campaign for office.”
  • A famous athlete might endorse a brand by appearing in their advertisements and saying, “I endorse this product because it helps me perform at my best.”
  • A customer might endorse a product by leaving a positive review and saying, “I highly endorse this company’s services.”

7. Plead for

To make a strong and emotional appeal for something, often in a desperate or urgent manner.

  • For instance, a person might plead for justice by saying, “We plead for the court to consider the evidence and deliver a fair verdict.”
  • A parent might plead for their child’s safety by saying, “I plead with you to take action and protect our children from harm.”
  • A protester might plead for social change by chanting, “We plead for equality and justice for all.”

8. Side with

To support or align oneself with a particular person, group, or viewpoint in a dispute or controversy.

  • For example, in a debate, someone might say, “I side with the opposition on this issue because of their strong arguments.”
  • A friend might side with you in an argument by saying, “I understand your perspective and I side with you.”
  • A person might side with a political party by saying, “I believe in their policies and I side with their ideology.”

9. Advance

To promote or further a cause, idea, or agenda by taking action or making progress.

  • For instance, an activist might advance their cause by organizing protests and raising awareness.
  • A company might advance their product by investing in research and development to improve its features.
  • A student might advance their education by taking advanced courses and pursuing higher degrees.

10. Propose

To suggest or put forward an idea, plan, or solution for consideration or discussion.

  • For example, a person might propose a new policy by saying, “I propose that we implement stricter regulations to protect the environment.”
  • A romantic partner might propose marriage by getting down on one knee and saying, “Will you marry me?”
  • A team member might propose a new project by presenting a detailed plan and saying, “I propose that we pursue this opportunity for growth.”

11. Press for

To actively support or promote a particular cause or idea. “Press for” is a slang term used to describe advocating for something, often in a strong or assertive manner.

  • For example, a protester might say, “We need to press for change in our government.”
  • In a conversation about social justice, someone might argue, “We should press for equal rights for all.”
  • A person discussing environmental issues might say, “It’s important to press for sustainable practices to protect our planet.”

12. Speak out for

To publicly express support or defend a cause or idea. “Speak out for” is a slang term used to describe advocating for something, often by using one’s voice or platform.

  • For instance, a celebrity might speak out for animal rights by promoting ethical treatment of animals.
  • In a discussion about education reform, someone might say, “We need to speak out for better resources for our schools.”
  • A person advocating for mental health awareness might speak out for destigmatizing mental illnesses.

13. Argue for

To present reasons or evidence in support of a particular cause or idea. “Argue for” is a slang term used to describe advocating for something, often by presenting a convincing argument.

  • For example, in a debate about healthcare, someone might argue for universal healthcare by highlighting its benefits.
  • In a discussion about gun control, a person might argue for stricter regulations to reduce gun violence.
  • A teacher might argue for smaller class sizes to improve student learning.
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14. Stand behind

To firmly support or endorse a cause or idea. “Stand behind” is a slang term used to describe advocating for something, often by showing unwavering support.

  • For instance, a company might stand behind its products by offering a money-back guarantee.
  • In a political campaign, supporters might stand behind a candidate by volunteering and spreading their message.
  • A person advocating for LGBTQ+ rights might stand behind the idea of equal marriage rights for all.

15. Throw weight behind

To lend support or influence to a cause or idea. “Throw weight behind” is a slang term used to describe advocating for something, often by using one’s influence or resources.

  • For example, a celebrity might throw their weight behind a charity campaign by promoting it to their followers.
  • In a discussion about climate change, someone might urge governments to throw their weight behind renewable energy initiatives.
  • A business leader might throw their weight behind a social justice movement by implementing inclusive policies within their company.

16. Be in someone’s corner

To be in someone’s corner means to support and advocate for them. It implies standing up for someone and being on their side in a situation.

  • For example, if a friend is going through a tough time, you might say, “I’m in your corner, I’ll support you no matter what.”
  • In a political context, a supporter might say, “I’m in the candidate’s corner because I believe in their policies.”
  • A teammate might encourage their fellow player by saying, “We’re in your corner, let’s win this game together.”

17. Be a proponent of

Being a proponent of something means to actively support and promote it. It implies advocating for a particular cause or belief.

  • For instance, someone who is passionate about environmental issues might say, “I’m a proponent of renewable energy.”
  • In a debate about healthcare, a person might argue, “I’m a proponent of universal healthcare because it ensures access for all.”
  • A teacher might encourage their students by saying, “I’m a proponent of lifelong learning, so keep seeking knowledge.”

18. Be a supporter of

Being a supporter of something means to back and endorse it. It implies showing allegiance and standing behind a person, cause, or idea.

  • For example, a sports fan might say, “I’m a supporter of this team, win or lose.”
  • In a political context, someone might declare, “I’m a supporter of this candidate because I believe in their vision.”
  • A friend might offer encouragement by saying, “I’m a supporter of your dreams, go after them with all your heart.”

19. Be a fan of

Being a fan of something means to admire and enjoy it. It implies being a supporter and enthusiast of a person, team, or thing.

  • For instance, a music lover might say, “I’m a fan of this band, I’ve been to all their concerts.”
  • In a sports context, someone might declare, “I’m a fan of this player, they have incredible skills.”
  • A movie enthusiast might express their excitement by saying, “I’m a fan of this director, their films are always captivating.”

20. Be a believer in

Being a believer in something means to have faith and trust in it. It implies having confidence and conviction in a person, idea, or principle.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m a believer in the power of positivity, it can transform lives.”
  • In a religious context, someone might declare, “I’m a believer in God’s plan for me.”
  • A mentor might encourage their mentee by saying, “I’m a believer in your potential, you can achieve great things.”

21. Be a backer of

To be a backer of something means to actively support or endorse it. It implies standing behind a cause or idea and advocating for it.

  • For example, “I’m a backer of renewable energy initiatives.”
  • In a political campaign, a candidate might say, “I need your support to be a backer of change.”
  • A person discussing a charity event might ask, “Will you be a backer of this cause?”

22. Be a promoter of

To be a promoter of something means to actively encourage or support it. It implies taking action to spread awareness and generate interest in a cause or idea.

  • For instance, “I’m a promoter of sustainable living.”
  • In a business context, a marketing professional might say, “Our goal is to be a promoter of our brand.”
  • A person discussing a social issue might state, “I believe it’s important to be a promoter of equality.”

23. Be a spokesperson for

To be a spokesperson for something means to speak on behalf of it and convey its message or position to others. It implies being the public face of a cause or organization.

  • For example, “She is a spokesperson for the environmental organization.”
  • In a press conference, a company representative might say, “I am here as a spokesperson for our company.”
  • A person discussing a political campaign might ask, “Who will be the spokesperson for this candidate?”

24. Be a defender of

To be a defender of something means to actively support and protect it from harm or criticism. It implies taking a stand and standing up for what one believes in.

  • For instance, “He is a defender of human rights.”
  • In a debate, someone might argue, “I am a defender of free speech.”
  • A person discussing a controversial issue might state, “I am a defender of the Second Amendment.”

25. Be a fighter for

To be a fighter for something means to actively and passionately advocate for it. It implies being dedicated to a cause and taking action to bring about change or raise awareness.

  • For example, “She is a fighter for social justice.”
  • In a protest, someone might chant, “We are fighters for equality!”
  • A person discussing a health issue might say, “I am a fighter for cancer research.”

26. Stanning

This term originated from the combination of the words “stalker” and “fan” and refers to being an obsessive and dedicated fan of a celebrity, artist, or public figure.

  • For example, “I’ve been stanning Beyoncé since her Destiny’s Child days.”
  • A fan might say, “I’m stanning this new artist, their music is amazing!”
  • Someone might tweet, “I can’t stop stanning this actor, they’re so talented!”

27. Riding for

This phrase means to stand up for, defend, or support someone or something wholeheartedly.

  • For instance, “I’m riding for my favorite sports team, no matter what.”
  • A person might say, “I’m riding for this politician because I believe in their values.”
  • Someone might comment, “I’m riding for this charity organization, they do amazing work!”

28. Boosting

This term refers to actively supporting, promoting, or spreading the word about someone or something to increase their visibility or popularity.

  • For example, “I’m boosting my friend’s new business by sharing it on social media.”
  • A person might say, “I’m boosting this artist’s music, they deserve more recognition.”
  • Someone might post, “I’m boosting this important cause, let’s raise awareness!”

29. Rooting for

This phrase means to express encouragement, hope, or support for someone or something, often in a competitive or challenging situation.

  • For instance, “I’m rooting for my favorite team in the championship game.”
  • A person might say, “I’m rooting for this contestant to win the talent show.”
  • Someone might comment, “I’m rooting for this author to release more books, I love their writing!”

30. Backing

This term means to officially or publicly support, endorse, or stand behind someone or something.

  • For example, “I’m backing this candidate in the upcoming election.”
  • A person might say, “I’m backing this new product, it’s innovative and high-quality.”
  • Someone might tweet, “I’m backing this organization’s mission, they’re making a positive impact!”

31. Standing up for

This phrase is used to describe actively supporting or defending a cause or belief, often in the face of opposition or adversity.

  • For example, “I’m standing up for equal rights for all.”
  • A person might say, “I will always stand up for what I believe in.”
  • In a discussion about social justice, someone might assert, “We need to stand up for marginalized communities.”

32. Getting behind

This phrase is used to express support or endorsement of a person, idea, or cause.

  • For instance, “I’m getting behind this campaign for environmental conservation.”
  • A person might say, “I’m getting behind this candidate for political office.”
  • In a discussion about a charity event, someone might mention, “I’m getting behind this cause and volunteering my time.”

33. Fighting for

This phrase is used to emphasize the strong and determined effort put into advocating for a cause or belief.

  • For example, “I’m fighting for better healthcare access for all.”
  • A person might say, “I’m fighting for justice and equality.”
  • In a discussion about animal rights, someone might declare, “I’m fighting for the rights and welfare of animals.”

34. Promoting

This term refers to the act of encouraging or supporting the growth, adoption, or awareness of a particular idea, product, or cause.

  • For instance, “I’m promoting sustainable living through my social media platform.”
  • A person might say, “I’m promoting diversity and inclusion in the workplace.”
  • In a discussion about a new book, someone might mention, “I’m promoting this author’s work because I believe in their talent.”

35. Advocating

This term is used to describe the act of publicly supporting or recommending a particular idea, policy, or course of action.

  • For example, “I’m advocating for stricter gun control laws.”
  • A person might say, “I’m advocating for mental health awareness and resources.”
  • In a discussion about education reform, someone might assert, “I’m advocating for equitable access to quality education for all students.”

36. Cheering on

When you cheer on someone or something, you are showing your support and encouragement. It can be used in various contexts, such as sports, politics, or personal endeavors.

  • For example, “I’m cheering on my favorite team in the championship game.”
  • In a political campaign, a supporter might say, “I’m cheering on the candidate who stands for my values.”
  • A friend might cheer on another friend who is starting a new business venture, saying, “I’m cheering you on every step of the way!”

37. Upholding

When you uphold something, you are maintaining or defending a principle, belief, or value. It often involves advocating for what you believe is right or just.

  • For instance, “She is upholding the rights of marginalized communities.”
  • In a legal context, a lawyer might say, “I am committed to upholding the Constitution.”
  • A person might uphold their personal values by refusing to compromise on certain issues, saying, “I am upholding my principles.”

38. Campaigning for

When you campaign for something, you are actively working to promote or support a cause, candidate, or idea. It involves spreading awareness, gathering support, and advocating for your chosen cause.

  • For example, “She is campaigning for environmental conservation.”
  • In a political context, someone might campaign for a specific candidate, saying, “I am campaigning for him because I believe in his policies.”
  • A person might campaign for equal rights by organizing rallies and events, stating, “I am campaigning for equal treatment and opportunities.”

39. Espousing

When you espouse something, you are promoting or advocating for a particular belief, idea, or philosophy. It involves publicly expressing support and actively spreading the word about your chosen cause.

  • For instance, “He is espousing the benefits of a plant-based diet.”
  • In a social justice context, someone might espouse the importance of equality, saying, “I am espousing equal rights for all.”
  • A person might espouse the benefits of meditation by sharing personal experiences and research, stating, “I am espousing the practice of mindfulness for overall well-being.”

40. Standing by

When you stand by someone or something, you are supporting or defending them, especially in difficult times. It involves being there for them and showing your unwavering support.

  • For example, “I am standing by my friend during this challenging period.”
  • In a legal context, a lawyer might stand by their client, saying, “I am standing by my client’s innocence.”
  • A person might stand by their principles by refusing to compromise, stating, “I am standing by my beliefs, no matter the circumstances.”

41. Getting on board

This phrase means actively supporting or joining a cause or idea. It implies that someone is fully committed and ready to contribute to the cause.

  • For example, “I’m getting on board with the campaign to reduce plastic waste.”
  • A person might say, “I’m getting on board with advocating for mental health awareness.”
  • Someone might encourage others by saying, “Come on, get on board and let’s make a difference!”

42. Speaking up for

This phrase means to express one’s support or defense for a cause or person. It implies taking a stand and using one’s voice to advocate for something.

  • For instance, “I’m speaking up for the rights of marginalized communities.”
  • A person might say, “We need to speak up for those who can’t speak for themselves.”
  • Someone might encourage others by saying, “Don’t be afraid to speak up for what you believe in!”

43. Getting the word out

This phrase means to actively share information or raise awareness about a cause or issue. It implies the act of spreading the word to reach more people.

  • For example, “We need to get the word out about the importance of recycling.”
  • A person might say, “I’m getting the word out about the upcoming protest.”
  • Someone might encourage others by saying, “Let’s all work together to get the word out and make a difference!”

44. Stumping

This term refers to actively campaigning or advocating for a cause or candidate. It implies the act of giving speeches, engaging with the public, and promoting a specific agenda.

  • For instance, “The politician is stumping across the country to gain support.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been stumping for environmental conservation for years.”
  • Someone might encourage others by saying, “Let’s go out and stump for our candidate!”

45. Pushing

This term means actively promoting or advocating for a cause or idea. It implies the act of pushing forward and making a strong effort to gain support or raise awareness.

  • For example, “She’s pushing for stricter gun control laws.”
  • A person might say, “We need to keep pushing for equal rights for all.”
  • Someone might encourage others by saying, “Don’t give up, keep pushing for positive change!”

46. Rallying

This term refers to actively gathering support or promoting a cause or idea. It often involves organizing events or demonstrations to raise awareness and gain public support.

  • For example, “We are rallying for climate change awareness.”
  • A political campaign might rally voters by saying, “Join us in rallying for change.”
  • A community organization might rally residents to support a local initiative.
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47. Crusading

This term describes the act of fighting passionately for a cause or belief. It implies a strong dedication and commitment to advocating for change.

  • For instance, “She is crusading for equal rights.”
  • A social justice activist might say, “We must continue crusading against injustice.”
  • Someone passionate about animal rights might be described as “crusading for the protection of animals.”

48. Vouching

Vouching refers to endorsing or supporting someone or something. It implies a personal guarantee or recommendation for the validity or credibility of a person or idea.

  • For example, “I’m vouching for her skills as a reliable employee.”
  • A customer might vouch for a product by saying, “I’ve tried it myself and can vouch for its effectiveness.”
  • A friend might vouch for another friend’s character by saying, “I can vouch for her honesty and integrity.”

49. Advocation

Advocation is the act of promoting or recommending a cause or idea. It involves actively supporting and advocating for a particular belief or course of action.

  • For instance, “She is known for her advocation of women’s rights.”
  • A teacher might engage in advocation by promoting the importance of education to their students.
  • An environmentalist might engage in advocation by advocating for sustainable practices.

50. Lobbying

Lobbying refers to the act of influencing or persuading lawmakers or officials to support a particular cause or policy. It often involves direct communication, such as meetings or campaigns, to sway decision-making.

  • For example, “The organization is lobbying for stricter gun control laws.”
  • A lobbyist might be hired to lobby on behalf of a specific industry or interest group.
  • Advocates for healthcare reform might engage in lobbying efforts to push for policy changes.
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51. Propagating

This term refers to the act of promoting or spreading a particular idea, belief, or cause. It often implies a deliberate effort to persuade or influence others to support the same cause.

  • For example, “She is propagating the importance of recycling in her community.”
  • In a discussion about climate change, someone might say, “We need more people propagating the need for sustainable practices.”
  • A social media influencer might post, “I’m propagating body positivity through my platform.”

52. Rooting

In the context of advocating, “rooting” means to actively support or champion a cause or belief. It implies standing up for or being in favor of something.

  • For instance, “I’m rooting for equal rights for all.”
  • In a conversation about animal rights, someone might say, “I’ve been rooting for stricter regulations on animal testing.”
  • A fan of a particular political candidate might declare, “I’m rooting for them to win the election.”

53. Advocacy

Advocacy refers to the act of publicly supporting or promoting a particular cause, issue, or group. It involves actively speaking out, raising awareness, and working towards positive change.

  • For example, “She has dedicated her life to advocacy for children’s rights.”
  • In a discussion about environmental conservation, someone might say, “We need stronger advocacy for sustainable practices.”
  • A social justice advocate might declare, “Advocacy is essential for achieving equality and justice.”

54. Spreading the word

This phrase means to actively share or communicate information, ideas, or beliefs in order to raise awareness or promote a cause. It often involves using various channels or platforms to reach a wider audience.

  • For instance, “We need more people spreading the word about the importance of mental health.”
  • In a conversation about a fundraising event, someone might say, “Let’s spread the word to maximize attendance and support.”
  • A social media influencer might post, “I’m spreading the word about this amazing new product.”

55. Getting the message across

This phrase refers to the act of successfully conveying or communicating a particular message, idea, or belief to others. It involves using clear and persuasive language or methods to ensure understanding and engagement.

  • For example, “During the presentation, she did an excellent job of getting the message across.”
  • In a discussion about public health, someone might say, “We need effective campaigns for getting the message across about the importance of vaccinations.”
  • A motivational speaker might emphasize, “Getting the message across is crucial for inspiring positive change.”