Top 48 Slang For Agitated – Meaning & Usage

Feeling agitated and need the right words to express it? Look no further! Our team has put together a list of the most colorful and expressive slang terms for feeling agitated. From mild annoyance to full-blown frustration, we’ve got you covered. Dive in and upgrade your vocabulary with these gems that perfectly capture that agitated mood!

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1. Riled up

When someone is riled up, they are extremely angry or upset about something.

  • For example, “He got riled up when he found out his favorite team lost the game.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t get riled up over such a small issue.”
  • Another example could be, “She was riled up after her car got towed.”

2. Worked up

To be worked up means to be emotionally agitated or upset about something.

  • For instance, “He was all worked up about the upcoming exam.”
  • Someone might say, “I don’t understand why you’re getting so worked up over a minor disagreement.”
  • Another example could be, “She gets worked up every time she sees a spider.”

3. Hot under the collar

When someone is hot under the collar, they are angry or irritated.

  • For example, “He was hot under the collar when his boss criticized his work.”
  • A person might say, “Try not to get hot under the collar when dealing with difficult customers.”
  • Another example could be, “She gets hot under the collar whenever someone interrupts her.”

4. Steamed

To be steamed means to be extremely angry or frustrated about something.

  • For instance, “He was steamed when he found out his flight was canceled.”
  • Someone might say, “I could tell she was steamed by the way she slammed the door.”
  • Another example could be, “They were steamed after waiting in line for hours.”

5. Bothered

When someone is bothered, they are irritated or annoyed by something.

  • For example, “He was bothered by the constant noise outside his apartment.”
  • A person might say, “I don’t understand why that comment bothered you so much.”
  • Another example could be, “She gets bothered when people chew loudly.”

6. Pissed off

This term is used to describe someone who is very angry or annoyed.

  • For example, “He was pissed off when he found out someone had taken his parking spot.”
  • A person might say, “I’m pissed off that my flight got canceled.”
  • Another might exclaim, “Don’t mess with him, he’s pissed off!”

7. Ticked off

This phrase is used to describe someone who is irritated or annoyed.

  • For instance, “She was ticked off when her computer crashed right before the deadline.”
  • A person might say, “I’m really ticked off that they didn’t invite me to the party.”
  • Another might complain, “I’m constantly getting ticked off by my noisy neighbors.”

8. Bent out of shape

This expression is used to describe someone who is upset or angry about something.

  • For example, “He got bent out of shape when he didn’t get the promotion he wanted.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t get bent out of shape over such a small mistake.”
  • Another might comment, “She’s always bent out of shape about something.”

9. Wound up

This phrase is used to describe someone who is feeling anxious or agitated about something.

  • For instance, “I’m all wound up about the big presentation tomorrow.”
  • A person might say, “He gets really wound up before a job interview.”
  • Another might admit, “I always get wound up when I have to speak in public.”

10. Fired up

This term is used to describe someone who is either very excited and energized or very angry.

  • For example, “She was fired up after winning the game.”
  • A person might say, “I’m fired up about the new project we’re starting.”
  • Another might exclaim, “He’s fired up and ready to fight for his rights!”

11. Aggro

This term is used to describe someone who is easily provoked or prone to anger. It can also refer to behavior that is confrontational or hostile.

  • For example, “He’s always getting aggro whenever someone disagrees with him.”
  • In a gaming context, a player might say, “That enemy is really aggro, be careful.”
  • A person discussing road rage might say, “Some drivers can be so aggro, it’s dangerous.”

12. On edge

When someone is on edge, they are feeling tense, nervous, or anxious. It can also refer to a state of heightened sensitivity or alertness.

  • For instance, “She’s been on edge ever since the accident.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been on edge all day, waiting for the test results.”
  • In a discussion about personal safety, someone might advise, “Always be on edge and aware of your surroundings.”

13. Up in arms

This phrase is used to describe someone who is very angry or outraged about a particular issue or situation. It implies a strong emotional reaction and a willingness to take action.

  • For example, “The community was up in arms over the proposed development.”
  • In a political context, someone might say, “Voters are up in arms about the new tax law.”
  • A person discussing a controversial decision might say, “The employees were up in arms when they heard about the layoffs.”

14. In a tizzy

When someone is in a tizzy, they are in a state of agitation, excitement, or confusion. It suggests a lack of composure or control over one’s emotions.

  • For instance, “She’s been in a tizzy ever since she found out about the surprise party.”
  • A person might say, “I was in a tizzy trying to finish all my assignments before the deadline.”
  • In a discussion about a chaotic event, someone might say, “Everyone was in a tizzy trying to evacuate the building.”

15. Jumpy

When someone is jumpy, they are easily startled or nervous. It suggests a heightened state of alertness or sensitivity to their surroundings.

  • For example, “He’s always been jumpy ever since the accident.”
  • A person might say, “I get jumpy whenever I hear loud noises.”
  • In a discussion about a scary movie, someone might say, “That scene made me so jumpy, I couldn’t sleep.”

16. Flustered

When someone is flustered, they feel anxious, overwhelmed, or confused. It often happens when they are in a stressful or chaotic situation.

  • For example, “I was so flustered during the job interview that I forgot my own name.”
  • In a crowded subway, a person might say, “I always get flustered when there’s a lot of people pushing and shoving.”
  • When someone is running late and can’t find their car keys, they might exclaim, “I’m getting flustered!”

17. Annoyed

Being annoyed means feeling irritated or bothered by someone or something. It often happens when someone does something that is frustrating or bothersome.

  • For instance, “I’m so annoyed with my neighbor, who always plays loud music late at night.”
  • If someone keeps interrupting during a conversation, one might say, “I’m getting really annoyed with your constant interruptions.”
  • When someone makes a mistake repeatedly, a person might sigh and say, “I’m starting to get annoyed with your carelessness.”

18. Frustrated

When someone is frustrated, they feel annoyed, angry, or helpless because they can’t achieve a desired outcome or solve a problem. It often happens when they encounter obstacles or face challenges.

  • For example, “I’m so frustrated with this computer program. It keeps crashing every time I try to use it.”
  • If someone is stuck in traffic and running late, they might exclaim, “I’m getting so frustrated with this never-ending traffic jam.”
  • When someone can’t find their keys and is already late, they might say, “I’m so frustrated right now!”

19. Tense

Feeling tense means being in a state of nervousness, stress, or unease. It often happens when someone is anticipating something or under pressure.

  • For instance, “I always feel tense before a big exam.”
  • If someone is waiting for important news, they might say, “I’m feeling really tense about the results.”
  • When someone is in a high-pressure situation, such as a job interview, they might comment, “I’m so tense right now!”

20. Irritated

Being irritated means feeling annoyed or bothered by someone or something. It often happens when someone does something that is frustrating or bothersome.

  • For example, “I’m so irritated with my coworker, who never cleans up after themselves.”
  • If someone keeps making loud noises while others are trying to concentrate, one might say, “I’m getting really irritated with all the noise.”
  • When someone is repeatedly interrupted while working, they might sigh and say, “I’m starting to get irritated with all the interruptions.”

21. Agitated

When someone is agitated, they are feeling annoyed, frustrated, or irritated. It often implies a state of restlessness or unease.

  • For example, “I’m getting agitated waiting in this long line.”
  • A person might say, “The constant noise is making me feel agitated.”
  • Another might express, “I’m feeling agitated because I can’t find my keys.”

22. Bugged

When someone is bugged, they are feeling irritated, bothered, or annoyed by something or someone. It can also imply a sense of being spied on or monitored.

  • For instance, “Stop tapping your pen, it’s really bugging me.”
  • A person might say, “I’m bugged by the fact that they didn’t invite me to the party.”
  • Another might express, “I feel bugged knowing that my boss is always watching.”

23. Rattled

When someone is rattled, they are feeling shaken, unnerved, or disturbed. It often implies a state of being emotionally or mentally unsettled.

  • For example, “The loud crash rattled me and left me feeling uneasy.”
  • A person might say, “I was rattled by the sudden change in plans.”
  • Another might express, “The scary movie really rattled me and gave me nightmares.”

24. Fuming

When someone is fuming, they are feeling extremely angry, furious, or enraged. It implies a state of intense anger and often involves visible signs of anger such as steam or smoke coming out of one’s ears metaphorically.

  • For instance, “He was fuming when he found out his car had been towed.”
  • A person might say, “I’m still fuming about what she said to me.”
  • Another might express, “His face turned red and he started fuming with anger.”

25. Rankled

When something rankles, it causes annoyance, resentment, or irritation. It often refers to a persistent feeling of being bothered or upset by something.

  • For example, “The criticism from my boss really rankled me.”
  • A person might say, “It still rankles that they didn’t apologize.”
  • Another might express, “The unfair treatment rankled him and he couldn’t let it go.”

26. Amped up

When someone is “amped up,” it means they are feeling a heightened level of excitement or energy. This slang term is often used to describe someone who is agitated or restless.

  • For example, “I’m really amped up for the concert tonight!”
  • Someone might say, “He’s been amped up all day, I think he’s on edge.”
  • A person might use this term to describe their own state of mind, saying, “I can’t sit still, I’m so amped up right now.”

27. Wired

To be “wired” means to be feeling nervous or anxious. This slang term is often used to describe someone who is agitated or on edge.

  • For instance, “I have a job interview tomorrow and I’m feeling really wired about it.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t sleep, I’m too wired from all the caffeine.”
  • Someone might use this term to describe their physical state, saying, “I feel so wired, my heart is racing.”

28. Jittery

When someone is “jittery,” it means they are feeling nervous or uneasy. This slang term is often used to describe someone who is agitated or restless.

  • For example, “I always get jittery before a big presentation.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling really jittery about the upcoming exam.”
  • Someone might use this term to describe their own state of mind, saying, “I can’t relax, I’m too jittery right now.”

29. Frazzled

To be “frazzled” means to be feeling overwhelmed or exhausted. This slang term is often used to describe someone who is agitated or stressed out.

  • For instance, “I’ve been dealing with so much lately, I’m completely frazzled.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling frazzled from all the work deadlines.”
  • Someone might use this term to describe their physical state, saying, “I look and feel completely frazzled.”

30. Upset

When someone is “upset,” it means they are feeling disturbed or bothered. This slang term is often used to describe someone who is agitated or emotionally distressed.

  • For example, “I’m really upset about what happened today.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t stop thinking about it, it’s really upsetting.”
  • Someone might use this term to describe their own state of mind, saying, “I’m feeling really upset right now, I need some time alone.”

31. Frantic

When someone is frantic, they are in a state of panic or frenzy. It can describe a person who is extremely agitated or anxious.

  • For example, “I was frantic when I realized I had lost my wallet.”
  • In a high-pressure situation, someone might say, “Stay calm, don’t get frantic.”
  • A person describing their busy day might say, “I was running around like a frantic chicken.”

32. Stressed out

When someone is stressed out, they are feeling overwhelmed or under pressure. It can describe a person who is agitated due to excessive stress.

  • For instance, “I’m so stressed out with all these deadlines.”
  • A student might say, “I’m really stressed out about the upcoming exams.”
  • A working professional might complain, “I can’t handle this workload, I’m constantly stressed out.”

33. Nervous

When someone is nervous, they are feeling uneasy or anxious. It can describe a person who is agitated due to worry or fear.

  • For example, “I always get nervous before giving a presentation.”
  • A person going for a job interview might say, “I’m feeling really nervous about it.”
  • A performer might admit, “I still get nervous before every show.”

34. Anxious

When someone is anxious, they are feeling worried or apprehensive. It can describe a person who is agitated due to anticipation or uncertainty.

  • For instance, “I’m anxious about the outcome of the test.”
  • A person waiting for important news might say, “I’m feeling anxious about it.”
  • A traveler might feel anxious before a long journey.
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35. Edgy

When someone is edgy, they are feeling tense or on edge. It can describe a person who is agitated or irritable.

  • For example, “I’m feeling really edgy today, don’t mess with me.”
  • A person in a confrontational situation might say, “I’m getting edgy, let’s calm down.”
  • A person describing their mood might say, “I’ve been feeling edgy all day, I don’t know why.”

36. Antsy

This term refers to feeling restless or impatient, often due to anticipation or nervousness.

  • For example, “I’ve been waiting for the bus for 20 minutes, and I’m getting antsy.”
  • A person might say, “I always get antsy before a big presentation.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I can’t sit still, I’m feeling so antsy!”

37. Ruffled

When someone is “ruffled,” they are upset or disturbed by something.

  • For instance, “She was really ruffled by the rude comment.”
  • In a conversation about a difficult situation, someone might say, “It’s no wonder he’s ruffled after what happened.”
  • A person might describe their own feelings by saying, “I’m feeling a bit ruffled right now.”

38. Seeing red

This phrase describes a state of extreme anger or rage, often to the point of losing control.

  • For example, “When he insulted my family, I saw red.”
  • In a discussion about triggers, someone might say, “Certain situations make me see red.”
  • A person might exclaim, “I was seeing red after I found out what happened!”

39. Frothing at the mouth

This expression is used to describe someone who is extremely angry or upset, often to the point of being uncontrollable.

  • For instance, “When she found out the truth, she was frothing at the mouth.”
  • In a conversation about a heated argument, someone might say, “They were both frothing at the mouth, screaming at each other.”
  • A person might exclaim, “I can’t believe he said that! It made me froth at the mouth!”

40. Aggravated

When someone is “aggravated,” they are annoyed or irritated by something.

  • For example, “The constant noise from construction was really aggravating.”
  • In a discussion about pet peeves, someone might say, “People who chew with their mouth open really aggravate me.”
  • A person might describe their own feelings by saying, “I’m feeling so aggravated right now.”

41. Perturbed

When someone is perturbed, they are irritated or slightly angered. It’s a milder form of agitation.

  • For example, “I was perturbed when my flight got delayed for the third time.”
  • Someone might say, “She seemed perturbed by the constant noise outside her apartment.”
  • A person might express their perturbation by saying, “I’m really perturbed by the lack of communication from my boss.”

42. Vexed

When someone is vexed, they are deeply annoyed or frustrated. It implies a higher level of agitation than being perturbed.

  • For instance, “I was vexed by the constant interruptions during my presentation.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t talk to me right now, I’m feeling really vexed.”
  • Another example could be, “I’m becoming increasingly vexed with the slow and unreliable internet connection.”

43. Disturbed

When someone is disturbed, they are emotionally or mentally upset. It can also refer to a feeling of being unsettled or uneasy.

  • For example, “I was disturbed by the violent scenes in the movie.”
  • A person might say, “The news about the natural disaster really disturbed me.”
  • Another example could be, “The sudden change in plans disturbed my sense of routine.”

44. Disgruntled

When someone is disgruntled, they are unhappy or dissatisfied with a situation or person. It often implies a sense of resentment or grumbling.

  • For instance, “The disgruntled employee complained about the lack of recognition.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling disgruntled with the poor customer service.”
  • Another example could be, “The disgruntled customers demanded a refund for the faulty product.”

45. Incensed

When someone is incensed, they are extremely angry or furious. It implies a high level of agitation and often involves a strong emotional reaction.

  • For example, “He was incensed by the unfair treatment he received.”
  • A person might say, “I am absolutely incensed by the irresponsible behavior of my neighbor.”
  • Another example could be, “The incensed protesters demanded justice for the victims.”

46. Chafed

This term is often used to describe someone who is frustrated or bothered by a particular situation or person.

  • For example, “He was chafed by his coworker’s constant interruptions.”
  • Another usage might be, “She became chafed when she realized her flight was delayed.”
  • In a discussion about customer service, someone might say, “I get chafed when I receive poor service at a restaurant.”

47. Flummoxed

When someone is flummoxed, they are completely baffled or puzzled by something.

  • For instance, “He was flummoxed by the complex instructions.”
  • Another example could be, “She became flummoxed when she couldn’t find her keys.”
  • In a conversation about difficult puzzles, someone might say, “This riddle has me completely flummoxed.”

48. Agog

This term is used to describe someone who is extremely interested or excited about something.

  • For example, “She was agog with anticipation for the concert.”
  • Another usage might be, “He was agog when he heard the news of his promotion.”
  • In a discussion about upcoming events, someone might say, “I’m agog to see the new movie that just came out.”