Top 65 Slang For Agreement – Meaning & Usage

In a world filled with different opinions and perspectives, finding common ground and agreeing with others can sometimes be a challenge. But fear not, because we’ve got you covered! Our team at Fluentslang has scoured the depths of the English language to bring you a list of the top slang phrases for agreement. From casual expressions to trendy sayings, this listicle is your go-to guide for understanding and embracing the language of agreement. Get ready to nod your head and say “yasss” as we explore the exciting world of slang for agreement!

Click above to generate some slangs

1. You’re so right!

This phrase is used to express strong agreement with someone’s statement or opinion.

  • For example, if someone says, “I think pineapple belongs on pizza,” you might respond, “You’re so right! It’s the perfect combination of sweet and savory.”
  • In a conversation about a controversial topic, you might hear someone say, “You’re so right! It’s important to consider multiple perspectives before forming an opinion.”
  • If someone suggests a plan and you think it’s a great idea, you could say, “You’re so right! Let’s do it!”

2. Totally!

This word is used to show complete agreement with what someone has said or proposed.

  • For instance, if someone says, “I think we should order pizza for dinner,” you might respond, “Totally! I’m craving pizza.”
  • In a conversation about a movie, someone might say, “That movie was amazing!” and you could reply, “Totally! The acting and storyline were top-notch.”
  • If someone suggests a plan and you think it’s a great idea, you could simply say, “Totally!”

3. Yeah

This word is a casual way of expressing agreement or affirmation.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Do you want to go grab a coffee?” you might respond, “Yeah, that sounds great.”
  • In a conversation about a recent event, someone might say, “The concert was incredible!” and you could reply, “Yeah, it was an unforgettable experience.”
  • If someone suggests a plan and you want to show agreement, you could simply say, “Yeah.”

4. Yeah, sure

This phrase is used to show agreement or acceptance of a suggestion or proposal, although it may not convey the same level of enthusiasm as other phrases.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Can you help me move this weekend?” you might respond, “Yeah, sure. I can give you a hand.”
  • In a conversation about trying a new restaurant, someone might say, “Let’s check it out!” and you could reply, “Yeah, sure. I’m up for trying something new.”
  • If someone suggests a plan and you want to show agreement, you could say, “Yeah, sure.”

5. Yep

This word is a casual and shortened form of “yes” that expresses agreement or affirmation.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Do you want to go for a walk?” you might respond, “Yep, let’s do it.”
  • In a conversation about a recent achievement, someone might say, “I got a promotion!” and you could reply, “Yep, you deserved it.”
  • If someone suggests a plan and you want to show agreement, you could simply say, “Yep.”

6. You bet

This phrase is used to express strong agreement or certainty. It is a casual way of saying “yes” or “definitely”.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Are you coming to the party tonight?” You might respond, “You bet!”
  • In a conversation about a plan, someone might say, “We’re going to win, right?” and the other person might reply, “You bet we are!”
  • If someone suggests doing something fun, another person might say, “You bet I’m in!”

7. Fo’ sho’

This phrase is a slang way of expressing agreement or certainty. It is often used in casual conversations or among friends.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Are you going to the concert?” You might reply, “Fo’ sho’!”
  • In a discussion about weekend plans, someone might say, “Let’s go to the beach,” and another person might respond, “Fo’ sho’!”
  • If someone suggests grabbing pizza for dinner, another person might say, “Fo’ sho’ sounds good to me!”

8. You betcha

This phrase is a colloquial way of expressing agreement or certainty. It is a variation of “You bet” and has a similar meaning.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Can you help me with this?” You might reply, “You betcha!”
  • In a conversation about a game, someone might say, “We’re going to win, right?” and the other person might respond, “You betcha!”
  • If someone suggests going out for ice cream, another person might say, “You betcha, I love ice cream!”

9. Aye

This is a slang term used to express agreement or affirmation. It is often associated with nautical or pirate language.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Do you want to go to the movies?” You might reply, “Aye!”
  • In a conversation about a plan, someone might say, “We’re all meeting at the park, aye?” and the others might respond, “Aye!”
  • If someone suggests ordering pizza for dinner, another person might say, “Aye, that sounds good!”

10. Yeppers

This is a playful and informal way of saying “yes”. It is often used in casual conversations or among friends.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Are you ready to go?” You might reply, “Yeppers!”
  • In a discussion about weekend plans, someone might say, “Let’s go hiking,” and another person might respond, “Yeppers!”
  • If someone suggests watching a movie, another person might say, “Yeppers, I’m up for that!”

11. Hell yeah

This phrase is used to show enthusiastic agreement or approval. It expresses a high level of agreement or excitement.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Do you want to go to the concert tonight?” a response might be, “Hell yeah, I’ve been waiting for this!”
  • In a conversation about a thrilling sports game, someone might exclaim, “Hell yeah, that was an amazing play!”
  • A person might use this phrase to show support for a friend’s idea, saying, “Hell yeah, let’s start our own business!”

12. Uh-huh

This is a casual way of saying “yes” or expressing agreement. It is often used in informal conversations or when someone wants to show they are listening.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Did you enjoy the movie?” a response might be, “Uh-huh, it was really good.”
  • In a discussion about a new restaurant, someone might say, “Uh-huh, I’ve been there before and the food is delicious.”
  • A person might use this word to indicate agreement with a statement, saying, “Uh-huh, you’re absolutely right.”

13. Totally

This word is used to express complete agreement or affirmation. It signifies complete alignment with someone’s opinion or statement.

  • For example, if someone says, “I think we should go on a vacation,” a response might be, “Totally, I need a break too.”
  • In a conversation about a new fashion trend, someone might say, “Totally, I love that style.”
  • A person might use this word to show agreement with a plan, saying, “Totally, let’s go to the beach this weekend.”

14. Absolutely

This word is used to express strong agreement or certainty. It emphasizes complete agreement or support for a statement or idea.

  • For instance, if someone says, “I believe in equal rights for all,” a response might be, “Absolutely, everyone deserves equality.”
  • In a discussion about a political issue, someone might say, “Absolutely, we need to address this problem immediately.”
  • A person might use this word to show agreement with a decision, saying, “Absolutely, let’s go with that option.”

15. My thoughts exactly

This phrase is used to indicate that the speaker has the same opinion or thought as the person they are responding to. It shows complete agreement and understanding.

  • For example, if someone says, “I think we should focus on renewable energy,” a response might be, “My thoughts exactly, it’s crucial for the environment.”
  • In a conversation about a book, someone might say, “My thoughts exactly, the ending was unexpected.”
  • A person might use this phrase to show agreement with a friend’s suggestion, saying, “My thoughts exactly, let’s try that new restaurant.”

16. I agree with you 100 percent

This phrase is used to express complete agreement with someone’s statement or opinion. It emphasizes that the agreement is absolute and unwavering.

  • For example, “I agree with you 100 percent that we should prioritize education.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might say, “I agree with you 100 percent, this issue needs to be addressed.”
  • A person might respond to a friend’s statement by saying, “I agree with you 100 percent, that movie was amazing.”

17. I couldn’t agree with you more

This phrase is used to express strong agreement with someone’s statement or opinion. It emphasizes that the agreement is so strong that it couldn’t be any stronger.

  • For instance, “I couldn’t agree with you more, we need to take action on climate change.”
  • In a conversation about politics, someone might say, “I couldn’t agree with you more, we need to prioritize healthcare.”
  • A person might respond to a friend’s suggestion by saying, “I couldn’t agree with you more, let’s go to that new restaurant.”

18. That’s so true

This phrase is used to express agreement with someone’s statement or opinion. It emphasizes that the statement or opinion is completely accurate and valid.

  • For example, “That’s so true, we should always be kind to one another.”
  • In a discussion about relationships, someone might say, “That’s so true, trust is the foundation of a healthy partnership.”
  • A person might respond to a friend’s observation by saying, “That’s so true, life is full of unexpected twists and turns.”

19. That’s for sure

This phrase is used to express strong agreement with someone’s statement or opinion. It emphasizes certainty and leaves no room for doubt.

  • For instance, “That’s for sure, hard work pays off in the long run.”
  • In a conversation about travel, someone might say, “That’s for sure, exploring new places broadens your perspective.”
  • A person might respond to a friend’s comment by saying, “That’s for sure, laughter is the best medicine.”

20. Tell me about it!

This phrase is used to express agreement with someone’s statement or opinion. It emphasizes that the speaker has personal experience or understanding of the situation being discussed.

  • For example, “Tell me about it! Traffic in this city is unbearable.”
  • In a discussion about work stress, someone might say, “Tell me about it! Deadlines can be so overwhelming.”
  • A person might respond to a friend’s complaint by saying, “Tell me about it! Dealing with difficult people can be exhausting.”

21. You’re absolutely right

This phrase is used to express complete agreement with someone’s statement or opinion. It emphasizes that the person is not only right, but absolutely right.

  • For example, if someone says, “The movie was amazing,” you might respond, “You’re absolutely right, it was fantastic!”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might say, “You’re absolutely right, we need to take action on this issue.”
  • If someone suggests a solution to a problem, you might agree by saying, “You’re absolutely right, that’s the best way to handle it.”

22. That’s exactly how I feel

This phrase is used to indicate that you share the same opinion or sentiment as someone else. It emphasizes that your feelings align exactly with theirs.

  • For instance, if someone says, “I think we should prioritize education,” you might respond, “That’s exactly how I feel, it’s crucial for our society.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might say, “I believe in equal rights for all,” and you might agree by saying, “That’s exactly how I feel, everyone deserves equal treatment.”
  • If someone expresses enthusiasm for a particular activity, you might respond, “That’s exactly how I feel, I love it too!”

23. Exactly

This word is used to indicate agreement or to confirm that something is correct. It emphasizes that what was said is precisely accurate or true.

  • For example, if someone says, “The meeting is at 3:00,” you might respond, “Exactly, I’ll be there.”
  • In a discussion about a specific topic, someone might make a statement, and you might respond, “Exactly, that’s the key point.”
  • If someone suggests a plan of action and you agree, you might simply say, “Exactly, let’s do that.”

24. No doubt about it

This phrase is used to express complete certainty and agreement. It emphasizes that there is no room for doubt or disagreement.

  • For instance, if someone says, “He’s the best candidate for the job,” you might respond, “No doubt about it, he’s highly qualified.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might make a statement, and you might agree by saying, “No doubt about it, that’s the truth.”
  • If someone suggests a solution to a problem and you believe it will work, you might say, “No doubt about it, that’s the way to go.”

25. Me neither

This phrase is used to indicate agreement by stating that you have the same opinion or experience as someone else. It emphasizes that you share the same lack of something.

  • For example, if someone says, “I don’t like spicy food,” you might respond, “Me neither, it’s too hot for me.”
  • In a discussion about a specific topic, someone might express a dislike for something, and you might agree by saying, “Me neither, I can’t stand it either.”
  • If someone mentions that they haven’t seen a certain movie, you might respond, “Me neither, let’s watch it together.”

26. I suppose so.

This phrase is used to express agreement, but with a sense of uncertainty or reservation. It implies that the speaker agrees, but may have some doubts or reservations about the statement.

  • For example, if someone suggests going to a new restaurant, you might respond, “I suppose so, but I’ve heard mixed reviews.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might say, “I suppose so, but I still have some reservations about the proposed solution.”
  • If someone suggests a plan and you agree, but with some hesitation, you might say, “I suppose so, but let’s consider all the potential risks.”

27. I guess so.

This phrase is used to express agreement, but with a sense of uncertainty or lack of complete confidence. It implies that the speaker agrees, but may not be entirely sure or convinced.

  • For instance, if someone suggests watching a particular movie, you might respond, “I guess so, but I haven’t heard much about it.”
  • In a discussion about a complex issue, someone might say, “I guess so, but I still have some questions about the details.”
  • If someone proposes a plan and you agree, but with some uncertainty, you might say, “I guess so, but let’s think about all the potential challenges.”

28. You have a point there.

This phrase is used to acknowledge and agree with someone’s argument or perspective. It indicates that the speaker recognizes the validity or correctness of the other person’s point.

  • For example, if someone presents a well-reasoned argument, you might respond, “You have a point there, I hadn’t considered that angle.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might say, “You have a point there, I can see why some people might feel that way.”
  • If someone makes a convincing case and you agree with their point, you might say, “You have a point there, I can’t argue with that logic.”

29. I was just going to say that

This phrase is used to express agreement by indicating that the speaker was just about to make the same point or statement. It implies that the speaker had the same thought or idea.

  • For instance, if someone suggests a solution to a problem and you were about to suggest the same thing, you might respond, “I was just going to say that, great minds think alike!”
  • In a discussion about a topic, someone might say, “I was just going to say that, it seems like the most logical conclusion.”
  • If someone makes a statement and you had the same thought, you might say, “I was just going to say that, you read my mind!”

30. Word

This slang term is used to express agreement, understanding, or acknowledgment. It can be used as a standalone response or as a way to affirm and support someone’s statement or perspective.

  • For example, if someone shares an opinion and you agree, you might respond, “Word, I totally agree.”
  • In a conversation about a shared experience, someone might say, “Word, I know exactly what you mean.”
  • If someone makes a statement and you acknowledge its truth or validity, you might say, “Word, that’s so true.”

31. Alright

This word is used to express agreement or acceptance of a situation or idea. It can also be used to indicate that everything is satisfactory or in order.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Can we meet at 5 pm?” you can respond with, “Alright, that works for me.”
  • In a conversation about plans, you might say, “Alright, let’s go to the movies then grab dinner.”
  • When someone suggests a solution to a problem, you can agree by saying, “Alright, let’s give it a try.”

32. Roger that

This phrase is commonly used in military and aviation contexts to acknowledge understanding of a message or instruction. It can also be used more casually to indicate agreement or compliance.

  • For instance, if someone says, “Please confirm that you received the information,” you can respond with, “Roger that, I got it.”
  • In a team meeting, a leader might say, “We need everyone to be on time tomorrow morning.” The team members can reply with, “Roger that, we’ll be there.”
  • When someone gives you directions, you can say, “Roger that, I’ll follow your instructions.”

33. Copy that

This phrase is similar to “Roger that” and is often used in military and radio communication to indicate that a message has been received and understood. It can also be used in everyday conversations to show agreement or acknowledgment.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Can you pick up some milk on your way home?” you can respond with, “Copy that, I’ll grab some.”
  • In a work setting, a colleague might say, “We need the report by tomorrow.” You can reply with, “Copy that, I’ll make sure it’s done.”
  • When someone shares a plan, you can show agreement by saying, “Copy that, sounds like a good idea.”

34. Got it

This phrase is a simple and direct way to indicate that you have understood something. It can be used in various contexts to show agreement, comprehension, or acknowledgment.

  • For instance, if someone explains a concept to you, you can respond with, “Got it, thanks for clarifying.”
  • In a conversation about plans, you might say, “I’ll meet you at the restaurant at 7 pm.” The other person can reply with, “Got it, see you there.”
  • When someone gives you instructions, you can show understanding by saying, “Got it, I’ll follow your directions.”

35. Affirmative

This word is a formal and affirmative way to express agreement or confirmation. It is often used in professional or official settings, but can also be used in everyday conversations.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Can you attend the meeting tomorrow?” you can respond with, “Affirmative, I’ll be there.”
  • In a military context, a soldier might report, “Affirmative, the target has been neutralized.”
  • When someone asks for your consent, you can give a formal agreement by saying, “Affirmative, you have my permission.”

36. All righty

This phrase is a casual way to express agreement or acceptance. It is often used to show enthusiasm or agreement in a lighthearted manner.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Do you want to go to the beach?” you might respond, “All righty!”
  • In a conversation about plans, someone might say, “Let’s meet at 7 pm, all righty?”
  • When someone suggests a fun activity, you could respond with, “All righty, let’s do it!”

37. Righto

This term is a casual way to indicate agreement or understanding. It is often used to acknowledge a statement or request.

  • For instance, if someone says, “We need to finish this project by tomorrow,” you might reply, “Righto!”
  • In a conversation about meeting up, someone might say, “Let’s meet at the park at 2 pm, righto?”
  • When someone gives you directions, you could respond with, “Righto, I’ll follow that route.”

38. Yup

This word is a simple and informal way to express agreement or confirmation. It is often used in casual conversations or text messages.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Do you want to grab dinner tonight?” you might reply, “Yup!”
  • In a discussion about plans, someone might say, “We’ll meet at the café, yup?”
  • When someone suggests watching a movie, you could respond with, “Yup, that sounds good!”

39. Indeed

This term is a more formal way to express agreement or affirmation. It is often used to emphasize agreement or to show strong support for a statement.

  • For instance, if someone says, “The weather is beautiful today,” you might reply, “Indeed!”
  • In a conversation about a controversial topic, someone might say, “That is indeed a valid point.”
  • When someone expresses their opinion, you could respond with, “Indeed, I completely agree.”

40. Without a doubt

This phrase is a strong way to express complete agreement or certainty. It is often used to emphasize that there is no room for doubt or disagreement.

  • For example, if someone says, “This is the best pizza I’ve ever had,” you might reply, “Without a doubt!”
  • In a discussion about a controversial decision, someone might say, “Without a doubt, this is the right choice.”
  • When someone asks for reassurance, you could respond with, “Without a doubt, everything will be fine.”

41. For sure

This phrase is used to express agreement or confirmation. It is a casual way of saying “definitely” or “absolutely”.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Are you coming to the party?”, you can respond with, “For sure!”
  • In a group discussion, someone might say, “We should all go out for dinner tonight.” and another person can reply, “For sure, I’m hungry.”
  • If someone suggests watching a movie, you can say, “For sure, I love going to the movies.”

42. Definitely

This word is used to express strong agreement or certainty. It is a straightforward and firm way of saying “yes” or “absolutely”.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Are you going to the concert?”, you can reply with, “Definitely!”
  • In a conversation about a plan, someone might say, “We should go hiking this weekend.” and another person can respond, “Definitely, I love hiking.”
  • If someone suggests trying a new restaurant, you can say, “Definitely, I’m always up for trying new places.”

43. You got it

This phrase is used to show agreement or acceptance of a request or statement. It is a casual and friendly way of saying “yes” or “I understand”.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Can you help me with this task?”, you can reply with, “You got it!”
  • In a conversation about splitting the bill, someone might say, “I’ll take care of it.” and another person can respond, “You got it, thanks!”
  • If someone asks for directions, you can say, “You got it, just go straight ahead and turn left at the next intersection.”

44. No doubt

This phrase is used to express complete agreement or certainty. It is a strong and emphatic way of saying “yes” or “without a doubt”.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Are you ready for the presentation?”, you can respond with, “No doubt!”
  • In a discussion about a decision, someone might say, “We should go with option B.” and another person can reply, “No doubt, it’s the best choice.”
  • If someone suggests going on a road trip, you can say, “No doubt, I love traveling.”

45. I’m in

This phrase is used to express agreement or willingness to participate. It is a casual way of saying “I’m on board” or “Include me”.

  • For example, if someone suggests going to a concert, you can respond with, “I’m in!”
  • In a conversation about a group activity, someone might say, “Let’s go hiking this weekend.” and another person can reply, “I’m in, it sounds fun.”
  • If someone proposes a game night, you can say, “I’m in, I love playing board games.”

46. That works

This phrase is used to indicate agreement or approval with a suggestion or plan.

  • For example, if someone suggests meeting at a certain time, you might respond with “That works for me.”
  • In a group discussion, someone might say, “Let’s split the tasks evenly.” Another person could respond, “That works.”
  • If someone proposes a solution to a problem, you might say, “That works, let’s give it a try.”

47. I agree

This phrase expresses agreement with a statement or idea.

  • For instance, if someone says, “I think we should go with option A,” you can respond with “I agree.”
  • In a debate or discussion, someone might state their position and you can simply say, “I agree.”
  • When discussing a topic, you might say, “I agree with what you said earlier about the importance of education.”

48. I’m with you

This phrase is used to show that you are in agreement or support someone’s position or idea.

  • For example, if someone says, “I think we should try a new marketing strategy,” you can respond with “I’m with you.”
  • In a team meeting, someone might propose a new project and you can say, “I’m with you on this, let’s move forward.”
  • When discussing a plan or decision, you might say, “I’m with you, let’s go ahead and implement it.”

49. I’m on the same page

This phrase indicates that you have the same understanding or viewpoint as someone else.

  • For instance, if someone explains a concept and asks if you understand, you can say, “I’m on the same page.”
  • In a team meeting, someone might outline a strategy and you can respond with “I’m on the same page.”
  • When discussing a topic, you might say, “I’m on the same page as you regarding the importance of sustainability.”

50. That’s a plan

This phrase is used to show agreement or approval with a proposed plan or idea.

  • For example, if someone suggests a specific course of action, you can respond with “That’s a plan.”
  • In a group discussion, someone might propose a solution and you can say, “That’s a plan, let’s go with it.”
  • When making arrangements, someone might suggest a time and place, and you can say, “That’s a plan, see you there.”

51. That’s a deal

This phrase is used to indicate that both parties have reached an agreement or made a deal.

  • For example, two friends might discuss plans and one might say, “Let’s meet at the coffee shop tomorrow at 10 am.” The other friend might respond, “That’s a deal!”
  • In a business negotiation, one party might propose a price and the other might say, “That’s a deal. We have an agreement.”
  • When making plans with a group, someone might suggest a time and place and the others might respond, “That’s a deal. See you there!”

52. That’s settled

This phrase is used to indicate that a decision or matter has been resolved or agreed upon.

  • For instance, in a group discussion about where to go for dinner, someone might say, “Let’s go to the Italian restaurant.” Another person might respond, “That’s settled then. Italian it is.”
  • When discussing a course of action, one person might suggest a plan and another might say, “That’s settled. We’ll follow your proposal.”
  • In a meeting, after discussing various options, someone might say, “We’ve reached a decision. That’s settled.”

53. That’s sorted

This phrase is used to indicate that a situation or issue has been resolved or organized.

  • For example, when discussing plans for a trip, someone might say, “I’ve booked the flights and accommodations.” Another person might respond, “Great, that’s sorted.”
  • In a team meeting, after discussing tasks and responsibilities, someone might say, “We’ve assigned everyone their roles. That’s sorted now.”
  • When finalizing a project, one person might confirm that all the necessary steps have been taken by saying, “Everything is in order. That’s sorted.”

54. Roger

This term is used to indicate understanding or agreement, often in a military or radio communication context.

  • For instance, in a military operation, a commander might give instructions over the radio and a soldier might respond with “Roger” to indicate they understand and will follow the orders.
  • In a team setting, someone might explain a task and ask if everyone understands. The team members might respond with “Roger” to indicate their agreement.
  • When discussing plans or arrangements, one person might summarize the details and ask if everyone is on board. The others might respond with “Roger” to confirm their agreement.
See also  Top 62 Slang For Intensity – Meaning & Usage

This phrase is used to show enthusiasm or agreement with a statement or action.

  • For example, if someone suggests going to a concert, another person might respond with “Right on!” to show their excitement and agreement.
  • In a political discussion, one person might make a point and another might respond with “Right on!” to show their support and agreement.
  • When someone shares a personal achievement or success, others might respond with “Right on!” to show their congratulations and agreement.

56. Amen

The word “amen” is often used as a slang term to express agreement or approval. It is derived from the Hebrew word meaning “so be it” and is commonly used in religious contexts.

  • For example, someone might say, “Amen to that!” to show agreement with a statement or opinion.
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, a person might respond, “I couldn’t agree more. Amen.”
  • Another might simply say, “Amen, brother!” to show solidarity with someone else’s viewpoint.

57. Ditto

“Ditto” is a slang term used to indicate agreement or that the same sentiment applies to oneself as well. It is often used as a shorthand way of saying “me too” or “same here”.

  • For instance, if someone says, “I love pizza,” another person might respond, “Ditto!”
  • In a conversation about favorite movies, a person might say, “I really enjoyed that film.” Another could reply, “Ditto. It was amazing.”
  • Someone might use “ditto” as a one-word response to show agreement with a previous statement.

58. Spot on

When someone says that something is “spot on,” they mean that it is exactly right or accurate. It is a slang term used to express agreement or to acknowledge the correctness of a statement or observation.

  • For example, if someone makes a prediction that turns out to be true, another person might say, “Wow, you were spot on!”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, a person might say, “You’ve hit the nail on the head. Your analysis is spot on.”
  • Another might simply say, “Spot on! I couldn’t have said it better myself.”

59. You said it

The phrase “you said it” is used to indicate agreement with someone’s statement or opinion. It is often used to emphasize that the speaker shares the same viewpoint.

  • For instance, if someone says, “This movie is amazing,” another person might respond, “You said it!”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, a person might say, “I think we need to take action.” Another could reply, “You said it. It’s time to make a change.”
  • Someone might use “you said it” to show support for a friend’s idea or suggestion.
See also  Top 35 Slang For Successful – Meaning & Usage

60. Fair enough

The phrase “fair enough” is a slang term used to indicate agreement or acceptance of a statement or argument. It is often used to acknowledge the validity of a point made by someone else.

  • For example, if someone says, “I think we should leave early,” another person might respond, “Fair enough. Let’s go.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, a person might say, “I understand your perspective.” Another could reply, “Fair enough, but I still disagree.”
  • Someone might use “fair enough” to show respect for an opposing viewpoint while still maintaining their own stance.

61. On the money

This phrase means that something is exactly right or accurate.

  • For example, if someone predicts the correct outcome of a sports game, you might say, “Wow, you were on the money with that one!”
  • In a business meeting, if someone proposes a solution that everyone agrees with, someone might say, “That suggestion is on the money.”
  • When discussing a plan that is well thought out and likely to succeed, someone might say, “I think this strategy is on the money.”

62. Agreed

This word is used to show that you are in agreement with someone or something.

  • For instance, if someone suggests going out for pizza and you think it’s a good idea, you can simply reply, “Agreed.”
  • When discussing a topic and someone makes a valid point, you might say, “Agreed, that’s a good perspective.”
  • In a group setting, if someone proposes a plan and everyone is in favor of it, someone might say, “Agreed, let’s move forward with that.”

63. You’re on

This phrase is used to accept a challenge or agreement proposed by someone.

  • For example, if someone challenges you to a game of basketball, you can reply, “You’re on!”
  • In a negotiation, if someone suggests a deal and you agree to it, you can say, “You’re on.”
  • When making plans with a friend and they suggest a specific time to meet, you can respond, “You’re on, see you then!”

64. I hear you

This phrase is used to show that you understand and acknowledge what someone is saying.

  • For instance, if someone expresses their opinion on a topic, you can respond, “I hear you.”
  • In a conversation where someone shares their personal experiences, you might say, “I hear you, that must have been difficult.”
  • When someone gives you advice and you appreciate their input, you can say, “I hear you, thanks for the suggestion.”

65. I second that

This phrase is used to show that you agree with a statement or proposal that someone else has made.

  • For example, if someone suggests ordering pizza for dinner and you agree, you can say, “I second that.”
  • In a meeting, if someone presents an idea and you think it’s a good one, you can say, “I second that motion.”
  • When discussing a decision and someone expresses their opinion, you can say, “I second that, let’s go with that option.”