Top 35 Slang For Alcoholic – Meaning & Usage

Whether you’re a seasoned drinker or just starting to explore the world of alcohol, it’s always helpful to be familiar with the lingo. From booze hound to lush, we’ve got you covered with our list of the top slang terms for alcoholic. So grab a drink and get ready to impress your friends with your newfound knowledge of the drinking culture. Cheers!

Click above to generate some slangs

1. Boozer

This term refers to someone who drinks alcohol heavily and regularly. It can be used to describe someone who has a habit of excessive drinking.

  • For example, “John is a notorious boozer. He’s always at the bar and never turns down a drink.”
  • In a conversation about partying, someone might say, “Last night, we went out with a group of boozers and had a wild time.”
  • A friend concerned about someone’s drinking habits might say, “I think Mark has become a bit of a boozer lately. We should talk to him.”

2. Drunkard

This term refers to someone who is habitually or frequently intoxicated. It implies a negative connotation and suggests a lack of control over one’s alcohol consumption.

  • For instance, “The town drunkard stumbled into the bar again last night.”
  • In a discussion about addiction, someone might say, “Becoming a drunkard is a dangerous path that can lead to serious health and social issues.”
  • A concerned family member might say, “My brother has been a drunkard for years, and it’s tearing our family apart.”

3. Alkie

This slang term is a shortened version of “alcoholic” and is used to describe someone who has a strong dependency on alcohol. It is often used informally and can be seen as derogatory.

  • For example, “I used to be an alkie, but I’ve been sober for five years now.”
  • In a conversation about addiction recovery, someone might say, “It takes a lot of strength and determination for an alkie to overcome their dependency.”
  • A person sharing their personal experience might say, “Being an alkie was the darkest period of my life, but I managed to turn it around.”

4. Tippler

This term refers to someone who drinks alcohol regularly but not excessively. It suggests a habitual or moderate consumption of alcohol.

  • For instance, “She’s more of a tippler than a heavy drinker. She enjoys a glass of wine with dinner.”
  • In a discussion about different drinking habits, someone might say, “I’m not a tippler myself, but I have friends who enjoy a few drinks every now and then.”
  • A person describing their own drinking habits might say, “I consider myself a tippler. I have a beer or two after work to unwind.”

5. Souse

This term refers to someone who is habitually intoxicated or frequently drinks to excess. It carries a negative connotation and implies a lack of control over one’s alcohol consumption.

  • For example, “He’s been a souse for years, and it’s affecting his health.”
  • In a conversation about alcoholism, someone might say, “Becoming a souse can lead to serious physical and mental health issues.”
  • A concerned friend might say, “I’m worried about Sarah. She’s been behaving like a souse lately, and it’s not like her.”

6. Barfly

A “barfly” is a person who frequents bars or spends a significant amount of time in bars. It typically refers to someone who enjoys drinking and socializing in bars.

  • For example, “John is such a barfly, you can always find him at the local pub.”
  • In a conversation about nightlife, someone might say, “I used to be a barfly back in my younger days.”
  • When discussing favorite hangout spots, a person might mention, “The barfly scene at that place is always lively.”

7. Lush

A “lush” is a slang term used to describe someone who drinks alcohol excessively or frequently. It often implies that the person has a high tolerance for alcohol and may be constantly under the influence.

  • For instance, “She’s known as the office lush because she’s always drinking at work.”
  • In a discussion about partying, someone might say, “I used to be a bit of a lush in my college days.”
  • When talking about alcohol preferences, a person might comment, “He’s a whiskey lush, always ordering top-shelf bottles.”

8. Tanked

To be “tanked” is to be extremely drunk or heavily intoxicated. It is a slang term commonly used to describe someone who has consumed a large amount of alcohol.

  • For example, “After the party, we were all completely tanked.”
  • In a conversation about wild nights out, someone might say, “I got so tanked last weekend, I can barely remember anything.”
  • When discussing the effects of alcohol, a person might comment, “I can’t handle getting tanked anymore, the hangovers are unbearable.”

9. Hammered

To be “hammered” is to be extremely drunk or intoxicated. The term implies a level of intoxication where one’s actions and judgment are significantly impaired.

  • For instance, “He was so hammered last night, he couldn’t even walk straight.”
  • In a discussion about partying, someone might say, “We all got hammered at that concert, it was a wild night.”
  • When talking about memorable nights out, a person might recall, “I’ve never been as hammered as I was on my 21st birthday.”

10. Wasted

To be “wasted” is to be heavily intoxicated or under the influence of drugs. The term is often used to describe a state of extreme drunkenness or drug-induced impairment.

  • For example, “She got wasted at the party and had to be carried home.”
  • In a conversation about regrettable nights out, someone might say, “I’ve had a few nights where I woke up completely wasted and couldn’t remember a thing.”
  • When discussing the consequences of excessive drinking, a person might comment, “Getting wasted every weekend is not a healthy lifestyle choice.”

11. Trashed

This term refers to being heavily under the influence of alcohol. It implies a state of complete drunkenness and loss of control.

  • For example, “After a night of heavy drinking, he was completely trashed.”
  • In a conversation about a wild party, someone might say, “Everyone was trashed by the end of the night.”
  • A person describing their own experience might say, “I got trashed at the bar last night and don’t remember anything.”

12. Blitzed

This slang term means being highly intoxicated, similar to being trashed. It suggests a rapid and intense consumption of alcohol.

  • For instance, “They went out and got blitzed at the club.”
  • In a discussion about a wild night out, someone might say, “We were all completely blitzed.”
  • A person describing their state might say, “I was so blitzed last night, I couldn’t even walk straight.”

13. Sloshed

To be sloshed means to be drunk or heavily under the influence of alcohol. It implies a lack of balance and coordination.

  • For example, “She stumbled into the party completely sloshed.”
  • In a conversation about a night of drinking, someone might say, “We all got sloshed at the bar.”
  • A person describing their own condition might say, “I was so sloshed, I couldn’t even find my way home.”

14. Plastered

This slang term refers to being heavily intoxicated, similar to being trashed. It suggests a state of complete inebriation and impaired judgment.

  • For instance, “He was so plastered that he couldn’t even stand.”
  • In a discussion about a crazy night out, someone might say, “We all got completely plastered.”
  • A person describing their own state might say, “I got plastered at the party and made a fool of myself.”

15. Buzzed

To be buzzed means to be mildly intoxicated, typically after consuming a small amount of alcohol. It suggests a light and pleasant feeling of intoxication.

  • For example, “After a couple of beers, he started feeling buzzed.”
  • In a conversation about a casual gathering, someone might say, “We were all just a little buzzed.”
  • A person describing their own state might say, “I like to have a few drinks and get a nice buzz.”

16. Tipsy

Tipsy refers to the state of being slightly intoxicated or drunk. It is often used to describe someone who has consumed alcohol but is not heavily intoxicated.

  • For example, “After a few drinks, she started feeling tipsy.”
  • A person might say, “I don’t want to get too tipsy tonight, just a couple of drinks.”
  • Another might ask, “Are you feeling tipsy yet?”

17. Three sheets to the wind

This phrase is used to describe someone who is heavily intoxicated or drunk. It suggests that the person is so drunk that they are unsteady on their feet, like a ship with its sails in disarray.

  • For instance, “After the party, he was three sheets to the wind and could barely walk.”
  • In a conversation about a wild night out, someone might say, “We got completely three sheets to the wind last night.”
  • A person might warn, “Be careful with those shots, or you’ll end up three sheets to the wind.”

18. Sot

Sot is a term used to describe someone who is a habitual drinker or an alcoholic. It can be used to refer to someone who regularly consumes alcohol to excess.

  • For example, “He’s been a sot for years, always drinking at the bar.”
  • In a discussion about addiction, someone might say, “Becoming a sot can have serious consequences for your health.”
  • A person might comment, “It’s sad to see someone become a sot and lose control of their life.”

19. Winosaur

Winosaur is a playful term used to describe someone who is a wine enthusiast and frequently enjoys drinking wine. It combines the words “wine” and “dinosaur” to create a fun and lighthearted term.

  • For instance, “She’s a total winosaur, always trying different wines and attending wine tastings.”
  • In a conversation about favorite drinks, someone might say, “I’m more of a beer person, but my friend is a winosaur.”
  • A person might joke, “I don’t need a glass, just give me the whole bottle like a true winosaur.”

20. Sauce hound

Sauce hound is a slang term used to describe someone who drinks alcohol excessively or constantly. It implies that the person is constantly seeking or “hound-ing” for alcohol, like a dog looking for food.

  • For example, “He’s a real sauce hound, always at the bar and never without a drink.”
  • In a conversation about partying, someone might say, “Watch out for that sauce hound, he’ll drink everyone under the table.”
  • A person might comment, “Being a sauce hound is no way to live, moderation is key.”

21. Smashed

This term is used to describe someone who is heavily intoxicated or under the influence of alcohol. It implies a loss of control and a high level of intoxication.

  • For example, “After the party, he was completely smashed and couldn’t even walk straight.”
  • In a conversation about a wild night out, someone might say, “We got totally smashed and ended up dancing on tables.”
  • A friend might ask, “Are you sure you want to go out tonight? You got pretty smashed last time.”

22. Loaded

This slang term refers to being drunk or heavily under the influence of alcohol. It implies a high level of intoxication and can be used to describe someone who is visibly affected by alcohol.

  • For instance, “He stumbled into the bar, clearly loaded and looking for another drink.”
  • In a discussion about partying, someone might say, “We got so loaded last night, I can’t even remember what happened.”
  • A person might warn their friend, “Don’t drive, you’re too loaded to get behind the wheel.”

23. Blotto

This slang term is used to describe someone who is extremely drunk or heavily intoxicated. It implies a state of complete inebriation.

  • For example, “He was blotto after drinking all night at the party.”
  • In a conversation about excessive drinking, someone might say, “I can’t believe how blotto he got last night.”
  • A friend might jokingly comment, “You’re going to end up blotto if you keep downing those shots.”

24. Pickled

This slang term refers to being drunk or intoxicated. It is often used to describe someone who has consumed a large amount of alcohol and is visibly affected by it.

  • For instance, “She stumbled out of the bar, clearly pickled from all the drinks.”
  • In a discussion about a night of heavy drinking, someone might say, “We all got completely pickled at the party.”
  • A person might ask their friend, “Are you planning on getting pickled tonight?”

25. Zonked

This slang term is used to describe someone who is heavily drunk or intoxicated. It implies a state of extreme intoxication and can be used to describe someone who is visibly affected by alcohol.

  • For example, “He passed out on the couch, completely zonked after drinking all night.”
  • In a conversation about a wild night out, someone might say, “We partied until dawn and ended up zonked.”
  • A friend might express concern, “You were zonked last night, maybe you should take it easy tonight.”

26. Blasted

This slang term is used to describe someone who is heavily intoxicated or under the influence of alcohol. It implies a state of being completely intoxicated.

  • For example, “After a night of heavy drinking, he was completely blasted.”
  • In a conversation about a wild party, someone might say, “Everyone was so blasted, it was crazy.”
  • A person might describe their own state by saying, “I got a bit too blasted last night and don’t remember much.”

27. Juiced

This slang term refers to being drunk or under the influence of alcohol. It implies a state of being energized or excited due to the effects of alcohol.

  • For instance, “He was juiced up and ready to party all night.”
  • In a discussion about a fun night out, someone might say, “We were all juiced and having a great time.”
  • A person might describe their experience by saying, “I went to the bar and got completely juiced.”

28. Plowed

This slang term is used to describe someone who is very drunk or heavily intoxicated. It implies a state of being completely under the influence of alcohol.

  • For example, “He stumbled out of the bar, completely plowed.”
  • In a conversation about a wild night, someone might say, “We got so plowed at the party last night.”
  • A person might describe their own state by saying, “I got plowed and ended up doing some silly things.”

29. Saucehead

This slang term is used to describe someone who is a heavy drinker or often consumes alcohol in large quantities. It implies a person who is frequently under the influence of alcohol.

  • For instance, “He’s known as a saucehead because he’s always drinking.”
  • In a discussion about someone’s habits, someone might say, “He’s a real saucehead, you can always find him at the bar.”
  • A person might describe themselves by saying, “I used to be a real saucehead, but I’ve cut back on drinking now.”

30. Hooch

This slang term refers to an alcoholic beverage, often of low quality or homemade. It can also be used to describe any strong alcoholic drink.

  • For example, “They brought some hooch to the party.”
  • In a conversation about different types of alcohol, someone might say, “I prefer a good whiskey over any hooch.”
  • A person might describe their experience by saying, “I had a few glasses of hooch and it really hit me hard.”

31. Sauce

This slang term refers to any type of alcoholic beverage. It is commonly used to describe a drink or the act of drinking alcohol.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need a glass of sauce to relax after work.”
  • In a social setting, a person might ask, “Who wants some sauce?”
  • A friend might jokingly say, “Looks like you’ve had enough sauce for the night.”

32. Juicehead

This term is used to describe someone who drinks alcohol excessively or frequently. It implies that the person is dependent on alcohol and consumes it in large quantities.

  • For instance, a person might say, “He’s a real juicehead, always seen with a drink in his hand.”
  • In a conversation about partying, someone might comment, “We were all juiceheads back in college.”
  • A concerned friend might express, “I think he needs help, he’s turning into a juicehead.”

33. Firewater

This slang term refers to any type of strong alcoholic beverage, especially those with a high alcohol content. It is often used to describe liquor or spirits that have a potent effect when consumed.

  • For example, someone might say, “Be careful with that firewater, it’s stronger than you think.”
  • In a discussion about party drinks, a person might ask, “Anyone up for some firewater shots?”
  • A bartender might recommend, “If you want something with a kick, try our firewater cocktail.”

34. Moonshine

This term refers to homemade or illegally distilled alcohol, typically made in small quantities without proper regulation or taxation. Moonshine is known for its high alcohol content and often has a strong, harsh taste.

  • For instance, a person might say, “He brought a jar of moonshine to the party.”
  • In a conversation about bootlegging, someone might mention, “Moonshine was a popular product during Prohibition.”
  • A person sharing a story might say, “I once tried some homemade moonshine and it knocked me off my feet.”

35. Sipper

This slang term is used to describe someone who drinks alcohol in small quantities or at a slow pace. It implies that the person is not a heavy or frequent drinker, but rather enjoys alcohol in moderation.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m just a sipper, I like to enjoy my drink slowly.”
  • In a discussion about drinking habits, someone might comment, “I’m more of a sipper than a chugger.”
  • A friend might joke, “You’re such a sipper, it takes you forever to finish a drink.”
See also  Top 30 Slang For Top Priority – Meaning & Usage