Top 61 Slang For Allow – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to expressing permission or giving someone the go-ahead, English has a wide range of slang terms that add a touch of flair to the conversation. From casual to formal, we’ve rounded up the top slang words for “allow” that are currently trending. Whether you want to sound cool or simply expand your vocabulary, this listicle is here to help you navigate the world of slang and keep you in the know. So, get ready to up your linguistic game and discover some exciting new ways to say “allow.”

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1. Let

To allow or give permission for something to happen or be done. “Let” is a common slang term used to indicate permission or allowance.

  • For example, a parent might say, “I’ll let you go to the party if you finish your homework.”
  • In a conversation about borrowing something, one person might ask, “Can you let me borrow your car?”
  • A friend might say, “Let me know if you need any help with your project.”

2. Give the green light

To give approval or permission for something to proceed. “Give the green light” is an idiom often used to indicate permission or clearance.

  • For instance, a manager might say, “I’ll give the green light for the project to start.”
  • In a discussion about a new business venture, someone might ask, “Did they give you the green light for the investment?”
  • A team leader might announce, “We’ve been given the green light to hire more staff.”

3. Give the go-ahead

To give permission or authorization for something to happen or be done. “Give the go-ahead” is a slang term commonly used to indicate approval or permission.

  • For example, a supervisor might say, “I’ll give the go-ahead for the proposal.”
  • In a conversation about a construction project, someone might ask, “Did they give you the go-ahead to start building?”
  • A coach might tell their team, “I’ve given the go-ahead for extra practice sessions.”

4. Give the nod

To give approval or permission through a subtle gesture or signal, such as a nod of the head. “Give the nod” is a slang term often used to indicate permission or agreement.

  • For instance, a teacher might give a student the nod to leave the classroom early.
  • In a discussion about promotions at work, someone might say, “He gave me the nod for the new position.”
  • A coach might give a player the nod to enter the game.

5. Grant

To give or allow someone to have or do something. “Grant” is a formal term that can also be used as slang to indicate permission or allowance.

  • For example, a supervisor might say, “I’ll grant you permission to take the day off.”
  • In a conversation about a scholarship application, someone might ask, “Did they grant you the funds for your studies?”
  • A parent might tell their child, “I’ll grant you one hour of screen time.”

6. Approve

To give permission or consent for something to happen. When someone approves of something, they are indicating their support or agreement with it.

  • For example, a supervisor might say, “I approve your request for time off.”
  • A teacher might write on a student’s paper, “Great job! I approve of your creative approach.”
  • In a meeting, a team member might say, “I think we should approve the new marketing strategy.”

7. Sanction

To officially authorize or permit something. Sanctioning something means giving formal approval or permission for it to take place.

  • For instance, a government might sanction a new law or policy.
  • A sports organization might sanction a tournament or event.
  • In a school, a teacher might sanction a field trip for the students.

8. Permit

To allow or grant permission for something to happen. When someone permits something, they are giving their consent or approval for it to take place.

  • For example, a parent might permit their child to go to a friend’s house.
  • A security guard might permit someone to enter a restricted area after checking their identification.
  • A teacher might permit students to work in groups for a project.

9. Authorize

To officially grant permission or approval for something. When someone authorizes something, they are giving their formal consent or endorsement for it to occur.

  • For instance, a manager might authorize a purchase or expense.
  • A parent might authorize their child to participate in a school trip.
  • A supervisor might authorize an employee to take on additional responsibilities.

10. Clear

To give permission or approval for something to proceed. When someone clears something, they are indicating that it is acceptable or allowed.

  • For example, a doctor might clear a patient for surgery.
  • A manager might clear a project to move forward.
  • A teacher might clear a student’s absence from class.

11. OK

This term is used to indicate agreement or approval. It can also be used to give permission for something.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Can I borrow your car?” a response might be, “OK, but be careful.”
  • In a conversation about plans, one person might say, “OK, let’s meet at 7pm.”
  • If a child asks, “Can I have a cookie?” a parent might reply, “OK, just one.”

12. Rubber stamp

To “rubber stamp” something means to approve it without questioning or making any changes. The term is often used to describe a process where something is approved automatically or without much thought.

  • For example, if a supervisor signs off on every request without reviewing them, it can be said that they are “rubber stamping” the requests.
  • In a discussion about bureaucracy, someone might say, “The system is just a rubber stamp. Nothing gets done.”
  • If a decision is made quickly and without much consideration, one might say, “They just rubber stamped that proposal.”

13. Sign off on

To “sign off on” something means to give official approval or authorization for it. The term is often used in a professional or formal context.

  • For instance, if a manager approves a project, they might “sign off on” the final plan.
  • In a business setting, someone might say, “I’ll need to sign off on that expense report before it can be reimbursed.”
  • If a supervisor gives permission for an employee to take time off, they might say, “I’ll sign off on your vacation request.”

14. Say yes

This phrase simply means to give permission or approval for something. It is a straightforward way of indicating agreement or allowing something to happen.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Can I use your computer?” a response might be, “Yes, you can.”
  • In a conversation about plans, one person might say, “Yes, let’s go to the movies.”
  • If a child asks, “Can I have a piece of candy?” a parent might reply, “Yes, but just one.”

15. Say the word

This phrase is used to indicate that someone has permission to do something or that they are allowed to proceed with a plan or action.

  • For instance, if someone is waiting for confirmation to start a project, they might say, “Just say the word and I’ll get started.”
  • In a discussion about making a decision, someone might say, “If everyone agrees, we can say the word and move forward.”
  • If a supervisor is giving an employee permission to take time off, they might say, “Just let me know when you’re ready to take your vacation. Just say the word.”

16. Give the thumbs up

To give approval or permission for something.

  • For example, “My boss gave the thumbs up for me to take the day off.”
  • A parent might give the thumbs up to their child’s request to go to a friend’s house.
  • In a team meeting, the manager might give the thumbs up to a proposed project.
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17. Give the okay

To grant permission or approval for something.

  • For instance, “The teacher gave the okay for the students to start their project.”
  • A supervisor might give the okay for an employee to take a vacation.
  • In a group discussion, someone might say, “Let’s wait until the boss gives the okay before proceeding.”

18. Give the go signal

To give a signal or indication that it is permissible to proceed or take action.

  • For example, “The referee gave the go signal for the race to begin.”
  • A project manager might give the go signal to start a new initiative.
  • In a military operation, the commander gives the go signal for the troops to advance.

19. Give the green flag

To give permission or authorization for something to happen.

  • For instance, “The principal gave the green flag for the school dance to take place.”
  • A supervisor might give the green flag for an employee to implement a new procedure.
  • In a sports competition, the referee gives the green flag for the game to start.

20. Give the seal of approval

To give official approval or support for something.

  • For example, “The celebrity chef gave the seal of approval to the restaurant’s new menu.”
  • A product reviewer might give the seal of approval to a new gadget.
  • In a business partnership, one company might give the seal of approval to the other’s proposal.

21. Give the okay sign

This phrase refers to giving approval or permission for something to happen. It can be used in a literal sense or figuratively.

  • For example, “The boss gave the okay sign for the project to proceed.”
  • In a conversation about plans, someone might say, “I’ll check with my parents and see if they give the okay sign for me to go.”
  • Another usage could be, “I asked my friend if she could lend me some money, and she gave the okay sign.”

22. Give the all-clear

This phrase is often used in situations where a danger or obstacle has been cleared, and it is now safe to proceed.

  • For instance, in a military context, a commanding officer might say, “The area has been secured. Give the all-clear to proceed.”
  • In a medical setting, a doctor might say, “The test results came back negative. We can give the all-clear for the surgery.”
  • Another usage could be, “After checking the weather conditions, the pilot gave the all-clear for takeoff.”

23. Rubber-stamp

To “rubber-stamp” something means to approve or endorse it without questioning or making any changes.

  • For example, “The committee rubber-stamped the proposal without thoroughly reviewing it.”
  • In a political context, someone might say, “The party leadership rubber-stamped the candidate’s nomination.”
  • Another usage could be, “The manager rubber-stamped the project plan without considering the potential risks.”

24. Say the go

This phrase means to give permission or approval for something to start or happen.

  • For instance, in a race, the official might say, “On your marks, get set, go!” to signal the start.
  • In a business context, a manager might say, “Once we have all the necessary documents, I’ll say the go for the project.”
  • Another usage could be, “The teacher said the go for the students to start their group projects.”

25. Say the green light

This phrase is similar to “say the go” and means to give permission or approval for something to start or happen.

  • For example, “After reviewing the proposal, the board of directors said the green light for the new initiative.”
  • In a construction context, someone might say, “Once we receive the necessary permits, we can say the green light for the project.”
  • Another usage could be, “The coach said the green light for the team to start practicing for the upcoming season.”

26. Say the okay

This means to give permission or approval for something. It is a more casual way of saying “allow” or “approve”.

  • For example, a parent might say, “I’ll say the okay for you to go to the party.”
  • In a group setting, someone might ask, “Can we do this activity? Can you say the okay?”
  • A supervisor might say, “I’ll say the okay for you to take the day off.”

27. Say the thumbs up

This means to give approval or agreement for something. It is a more informal way of saying “allow” or “give the go-ahead”.

  • For instance, a team leader might say, “I’ll say the thumbs up for this project.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “If everyone agrees, we can say the thumbs up and move forward.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you say the thumbs up for me to borrow your car?”

28. Alright

This means to give permission or approval for something. It is a casual and informal way of saying “allow” or “give permission”.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Alright, you can start working on the project.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “If everyone is ready, we can go ahead and do it, alright?”
  • A manager might say, “Alright, I’ll allow you to leave early today.”

29. Affirm

This means to give consent or agreement for something. It is a more formal way of saying “allow” or “give permission”.

  • For instance, a supervisor might say, “I affirm your request to take time off.”
  • In a discussion, someone might say, “If everyone is on board, we can affirm this decision.”
  • A parent might say, “I affirm your choice to pursue your passion.”

30. Assent

This means to give approval or agreement for something. It is a more formal way of saying “allow” or “give permission”.

  • For example, a committee chairperson might say, “I assent to the proposal.”
  • In a meeting, someone might say, “If we all assent to this plan, we can move forward.”
  • A supervisor might say, “I’ll give the nod for you to proceed with the project.”

31. Concede

To admit that someone else is right or that you have been defeated. This slang term is often used in a more casual or informal setting.

  • For example, in a friendly argument, someone might say, “Alright, I concede, you were right.”
  • In a game or competition, a player might concede defeat by saying, “I can’t win this round, I concede.”
  • A person might use this slang term to acknowledge someone’s superior skills by saying, “I have to concede, you’re the better player.”

32. Admit

To confess or recognize the truth or existence of something. This slang term is commonly used to indicate accepting a fact or mistake.

  • For instance, if someone catches you in a lie, you might admit by saying, “Okay, you got me, I lied.”
  • In a situation where you’ve made a mistake, you might admit by saying, “I admit, I messed up.”
  • A person might use this slang term to acknowledge a fault or wrongdoing by saying, “I have to admit, I was wrong.”

33. Own up to

To accept and acknowledge one’s mistakes or actions, often used to indicate being honest or accountable for something.

  • For example, if someone accuses you of breaking something, you might own up to it by saying, “Okay, I’ll own up to it, I broke it.”
  • In a situation where you’ve hurt someone’s feelings, you might own up to your actions by saying, “I need to own up to what I said, it was insensitive.”
  • A person might use this slang term to show maturity and honesty by saying, “I’m ready to own up to my mistakes.”

34. Give the OK

To grant approval or authorization for something to happen. This slang term is often used in a more casual or informal context.

  • For instance, if someone asks for your permission to borrow your car, you might give the OK by saying, “Sure, I’ll give you the OK to use it.”
  • In a work setting, a supervisor might give the OK for an employee to take time off by saying, “I’m giving you the OK to go on vacation.”
  • A person might use this slang term to indicate approval by saying, “I’ll give you the OK to go ahead with your plan.”

35. Grant permission

To give authorization or consent for someone to do something. This slang term is often used to indicate giving someone the go-ahead or allowing them to proceed with a certain action.

  • For example, if someone asks if they can use your computer, you might grant permission by saying, “Yes, I grant you permission to use it.”
  • In a school setting, a teacher might grant permission for a student to leave the classroom by saying, “I grant you permission to go to the restroom.”
  • A person might use this slang term to indicate approval by saying, “I’ll grant you permission to attend the event.”

36. Enable

To enable someone means to give them the ability or power to do something. It can also refer to providing the necessary resources or support for someone to accomplish a task.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “I want to enable my students to succeed by providing them with the necessary tools.”
  • In a discussion about accessibility, someone might say, “We need to enable individuals with disabilities to access all public spaces.”
  • A coach might encourage their team by saying, “I believe in you and will do everything I can to enable your success.”

To consent means to give permission or agreement to something. It can refer to both verbal and written agreement, and is often used in legal or medical contexts.

  • For instance, a patient might give their consent for a medical procedure by signing a form.
  • In a discussion about relationships, someone might say, “Consent is crucial in any sexual encounter.”
  • A parent might ask their child, “Do I have your consent to share this photo on social media?”

38. Entitle

To entitle someone means to give them a right or claim to something. It can refer to legal rights, privileges, or benefits.

  • For example, a citizen might be entitled to certain government services or benefits.
  • In a discussion about inheritance, someone might say, “As the oldest child, I am entitled to a larger share of the estate.”
  • A company might offer a loyalty program where customers are entitled to exclusive discounts or perks.
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39. Empower

To empower someone means to give them power or authority, often with the intention of promoting self-confidence, independence, or positive change.

  • For instance, a mentor might empower their mentee by providing guidance and support to help them achieve their goals.
  • In a discussion about gender equality, someone might say, “We need to empower women to take on leadership roles.”
  • A motivational speaker might say, “You have the ability to empower yourself and create the life you desire.”

40. License

To license means to give official permission or authority to someone. It often refers to granting a legal document or certificate that allows someone to engage in a particular activity.

  • For example, a driver’s license gives someone permission to operate a motor vehicle.
  • In a discussion about intellectual property, someone might say, “You need to license your music before it can be used in a commercial.”
  • A business owner might say, “I am licensed to sell alcohol in this establishment.”

41. Endorse

To publicly declare support or approval for something or someone.

  • For example, a politician might endorse a candidate for office by giving a speech or appearing in an advertisement.
  • A company might endorse a product by featuring it in their advertisements and promotions.
  • A celebrity might endorse a brand by using their social media platform to promote it.

42. Validate

To confirm or verify the accuracy, truth, or validity of something.

  • For instance, a professor might validate a student’s research findings by reviewing their methodology and results.
  • A person might validate someone’s feelings by acknowledging and accepting them.
  • A company might validate a parking ticket to ensure that their customers don’t have to pay for parking.

43. Ratify

To formally approve or confirm something, usually through a vote or official process.

  • For example, a government might ratify a treaty by having it approved by the legislative body.
  • A board of directors might ratify a decision made by the executive team.
  • Members of an organization might ratify changes to the bylaws during a general meeting.

44. Countenance

To permit or tolerate something, often with a sense of resignation or acceptance.

  • For instance, a parent might countenance their child’s messy room because they want to pick their battles.
  • A boss might countenance a few minutes of lateness from an employee who is usually punctual.
  • A teacher might countenance a student’s unconventional approach to a project as long as it meets the objectives.
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45. Tolerate

To allow or endure something, even if it is unpleasant or goes against one’s preferences.

  • For example, a person might tolerate a noisy neighbor because they don’t want to cause conflict.
  • Someone might tolerate a boring meeting because they recognize its importance.
  • A pet owner might tolerate some mess or inconvenience in exchange for the joy and companionship their pet provides.

46. Accept

To accept something means to give permission or approval for it to happen or be done.

  • For example, “I accept your apology.”
  • Someone might say, “I accept your invitation to the party.”
  • In a business context, a supervisor might say, “I accept your proposal for the new project.”

47. Acknowledge

To acknowledge something means to recognize or admit its existence, truth, or reality.

  • For instance, “She acknowledged her mistake and apologized.”
  • In a conversation, one might say, “I acknowledge your point, but I still disagree.”
  • A student might acknowledge their teacher’s feedback by saying, “Thank you for acknowledging my hard work.”

48. Give the thumbs-up

To give the thumbs-up means to express approval or permission for something.

  • For example, “He gave the thumbs-up for the project to proceed.”
  • In a restaurant, a customer might give the thumbs-up to indicate that they enjoyed their meal.
  • A parent might give the thumbs-up to their child’s request to go out with friends.

49. Accede

To accede means to agree to a demand, request, or treaty.

  • For instance, “The company acceded to the union’s demands.”
  • In a negotiation, one party might accede to the other party’s terms.
  • A country might accede to an international treaty by signing and ratifying it.

50. Yield

To yield means to allow someone to pass or go first.

  • For example, “The driver yielded to the pedestrian at the crosswalk.”
  • In a crowded hallway, one person might yield to another to let them pass.
  • A cyclist might yield to a car at an intersection to ensure safety.

51. Concur

To agree or be in accordance with something. “Concur” is often used to indicate that someone allows or approves of a particular action or decision.

  • For example, in a meeting, someone might say, “I concur with the proposed plan of action.”
  • A person discussing a group project might state, “We need everyone to concur on the timeline for completion.”
  • In a debate, a participant might argue, “I concur with the opposing viewpoint on this issue.”

52. Comply

To obey or follow a rule, request, or command. “Comply” is often used to indicate that someone allows or permits a certain action or behavior.

  • For instance, a sign might say, “Please comply with the no smoking policy.”
  • A teacher might instruct their students, “You must comply with the classroom rules.”
  • In a workplace, a manager might say, “All employees must comply with the dress code.”

53. Include

To incorporate or encompass something within a larger whole. “Include” is often used to indicate that someone allows or includes something as part of a group or collection.

  • For example, a party invitation might state, “Please include your RSVP with your response.”
  • A person discussing a recipe might say, “Make sure to include all the necessary ingredients.”
  • In a survey, a question might ask, “Which of the following options best include your preferences?”

54. Incorporate

To integrate or include something as part of a whole. “Incorporate” is often used to indicate that someone allows or integrates something into a larger entity or system.

  • For instance, a business might say, “We will incorporate customer feedback into our product development.”
  • A teacher might explain, “We will incorporate group work into our lesson plans.”
  • In a discussion about urban planning, a person might suggest, “We should incorporate more green spaces into the city design.”

55. Adhere to

To stick to or follow a rule, guideline, or principle. “Adhere to” is often used to indicate that someone allows or adheres to a specific standard or expectation.

  • For example, a sign might say, “Please adhere to the speed limit.”
  • A coach might instruct their team, “You must adhere to the game plan.”
  • In a workplace, a supervisor might remind their employees, “We need to adhere to the company’s code of conduct.”

56. Stand for

To tolerate or accept something, especially when it is difficult or unpleasant.

  • For example, “I can’t stand for this kind of behavior in my classroom.”
  • In a discussion about unfair treatment, someone might say, “We need to stand for what is right and demand change.”
  • A person might express their frustration by saying, “I can’t stand for this anymore!”

57. Put up with

To tolerate or bear something, even if it is annoying or unpleasant.

  • For instance, “I don’t know how she puts up with his constant complaining.”
  • If someone is dealing with a difficult situation, they might say, “I have no choice but to put up with it for now.”
  • A person might express their annoyance by saying, “I can’t put up with this anymore!”

58. Live with

To accept or tolerate a situation, even if it is not ideal or desirable.

  • For example, “I have to live with the consequences of my actions.”
  • In a discussion about compromise, someone might say, “Sometimes you have to live with a decision you don’t fully agree with.”
  • A person might express their resignation by saying, “I guess I’ll just have to live with it.”

59. Make allowance for

To take into account or consider something when making plans or decisions.

  • For instance, “You need to make allowance for unexpected delays when scheduling appointments.”
  • If someone is planning an event, they might say, “We need to make allowance for bad weather and have a backup plan.”
  • A person might suggest, “Let’s make allowance for everyone’s preferences and find a compromise.”

60. Make provision for

To make arrangements or preparations for something in advance.

  • For example, “The company made provision for future growth by investing in infrastructure.”
  • In a discussion about financial planning, someone might say, “It is important to make provision for unexpected expenses.”
  • A person might suggest, “Let’s make provision for potential risks and have a contingency plan in place.”

61. Make room for

This phrase is used to ask someone to create space or allow for something or someone. It can be used literally or figuratively.

  • For instance, if a group of people are sitting on a crowded bench, someone might say, “Can you make room for me?”
  • In a meeting, if someone wants to contribute to the discussion, they might say, “Let’s make room for other perspectives.”
  • A parent might ask their child to make room for their sibling on the couch by saying, “Make room for your sister, please.”