Top 34 Slang For Also – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to expressing “also” in a more hip and trendy way, the English language has got you covered. Whether you’re looking to spice up your writing or just want to stay up to date with the latest linguistic trends, we’ve got a list of the top slang words for “also” that will take your vocabulary game to the next level. Get ready to impress your friends and colleagues with these cool and contemporary alternatives for “also”!

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1. AKA

This term is used to indicate an alternative name or alias for someone or something. It is often used to provide additional information or clarification.

  • For example, “John Smith, AKA the Phantom, is a notorious jewel thief.”
  • In a conversation about celebrities, someone might say, “Did you know that Robert Downey Jr., AKA Iron Man, also played Sherlock Holmes?”
  • A person might introduce themselves by saying, “Hi, I’m Sarah, AKA the party planner extraordinaire.”

2. Alias

An alias is a false or alternative name used by a person, especially by someone in a criminal or undercover context. It allows individuals to operate under a different identity.

  • For instance, a spy might use an alias when infiltrating enemy territory.
  • In a discussion about online privacy, someone might mention, “Many internet users use aliases to protect their real identities.”
  • A person might say, “I’m going to sign this letter with my alias, so no one knows it’s from me.”

3. Otherwise

This term is used to introduce an alternative option or choice. It suggests that there is another possibility or course of action.

  • For example, “We can take the bus, or otherwise, we can walk.”
  • In a conversation about food preferences, someone might say, “I don’t like spicy food; otherwise, I’ll eat anything.”
  • A person might suggest, “We could go to the beach, or otherwise, we could visit the museum.”

4. In addition to

This phrase is used to add more information or examples to a previous statement. It indicates that there is something else to consider or include.

  • For instance, “In addition to studying math, she also excels in science.”
  • In a discussion about benefits, someone might mention, “In addition to a competitive salary, the company offers great health insurance.”
  • A person might say, “I enjoy playing soccer, and in addition to that, I’m also a skilled chess player.”

5. Additionally

This word is used to introduce another point or piece of information that supports or strengthens a previous statement. It emphasizes the idea of adding something extra.

  • For example, “She is a talented singer. Additionally, she plays multiple musical instruments.”
  • In a conversation about travel, someone might say, “I love exploring new cities. Additionally, I enjoy trying local cuisines.”
  • A person might mention, “I work part-time, and additionally, I volunteer at a local animal shelter.”

6. Likewise

Likewise is used to indicate that something is similar or the same as what has been previously mentioned. It is often used to show agreement or to add a similar point.

  • For example, if someone says, “I love pizza,” you can respond with, “Likewise, it’s my favorite food too.”
  • In a conversation about hobbies, you might say, “I enjoy painting. Likewise, my sister is also an artist.”
  • When discussing opinions, you can say, “I think the movie was great. Likewise, my friends loved it too.”

7. Furthermore

Furthermore is used to add more information or to introduce an additional point. It is often used to strengthen an argument or to provide evidence.

  • For instance, if someone says, “The project was completed on time,” you can add, “Furthermore, it received positive feedback from the clients.”
  • In a discussion about climate change, you might say, “The average global temperature is rising. Furthermore, extreme weather events are becoming more frequent.”
  • When presenting a list of benefits, you can say, “This product is affordable, durable, and easy to use. Furthermore, it comes with a lifetime warranty.”

8. Moreover

Moreover is used to add more information or to introduce an additional point. It is often used to emphasize something or to provide further evidence.

  • For example, if someone says, “The team won the game,” you can add, “Moreover, they scored a record number of goals.”
  • In a conversation about travel, you might say, “The city has beautiful architecture. Moreover, the local cuisine is amazing.”
  • When discussing the benefits of exercise, you can say, “Regular physical activity improves cardiovascular health. Moreover, it helps reduce stress and improve mood.”

9. As well

As well is used to indicate that something is in addition to what has been mentioned. It is often used to show agreement or to add another similar point.

  • For instance, if someone says, “I’m going to the party,” you can respond with, “I’m going as well.”
  • In a discussion about favorite books, you might say, “I love fantasy novels. As well, I enjoy reading mystery novels.”
  • When talking about skills, you can say, “I can speak Spanish. As well, I’m fluent in French.”

10. Further

Further is used to add more information or to introduce an additional point. It is often used to provide more details or to expand on a topic.

  • For example, if someone says, “The research findings are interesting,” you can add, “Further analysis is needed to understand the implications.”
  • In a conversation about a project, you might say, “The initial results are promising. Further studies will be conducted to validate the findings.”
  • When discussing a plan, you can say, “The first step is to gather data. Further steps include analysis and implementation.”

11. Too

This word is used to indicate that something is in addition to what has already been mentioned or is true. It can be used to show agreement or to emphasize a point.

  • For example, “I want to go to the party too.”
  • In a conversation about favorite movies, someone might say, “I love action films too.”
  • Another usage could be, “I’m tired too, let’s take a break.”

12. For good measure

This phrase is used to indicate that something is being done in addition to what is necessary or expected. It suggests that something is done for extra assurance or completeness.

  • For instance, “She added some extra decorations for good measure.”
  • In a discussion about studying, someone might say, “I reviewed the material one more time for good measure.”
  • Another usage could be, “He decided to give a small bonus to his employees for good measure.”

13. Again

This word is used to indicate that something is happening or being done another time. It implies repetition or a return to a previous state or action.

  • For example, “Let’s watch the movie again.”
  • In a conversation about a failed attempt, someone might say, “I’ll try again.”
  • Another usage could be, “She fell down and had to start the race again.”

14. Yet

This word is used to introduce a contrasting or contradictory statement. It suggests that something is surprising or unexpected given the previous information.

  • For instance, “She studied hard, yet she failed the exam.”
  • In a discussion about a challenging situation, someone might say, “I’m tired, yet I keep going.”
  • Another usage could be, “He is rich, yet he lives a simple life.”

15. Into the bargain

This phrase is used to indicate that something is being added to an already good or advantageous situation. It suggests that something extra is being included or offered.

  • For example, “They offered a discount and free shipping into the bargain.”
  • In a conversation about a job offer, someone might say, “They promised a signing bonus into the bargain.”
  • Another usage could be, “The hotel provided excellent service and a complimentary breakfast into the bargain.”

16. To boot

This slang term is used to mean “in addition” or “as well”. It is often used to emphasize the extra or unexpected nature of something.

  • For example, “The movie was great and, to boot, it had an amazing soundtrack.”
  • A person might say, “I got a promotion at work and, to boot, I also received a raise.”
  • Another example could be, “She is not only talented but, to boot, she is also incredibly kind.”

17. In the bargain

This slang phrase is used to mean “additionally” or “as well”. It is often used to describe something that is an added benefit or advantage.

  • For instance, “I got a great deal on this car, and in the bargain, it came with a full tank of gas.”
  • A person might say, “I had a wonderful vacation and, in the bargain, I made some lifelong friends.”
  • Another example could be, “The book not only taught me a lot but, in the bargain, it also entertained me.”

18. On top of

This slang phrase is used to mean “moreover” or “in addition to”. It is often used to introduce another point or piece of information.

  • For example, “She is a talented singer and, on top of that, she is also an amazing dancer.”
  • A person might say, “He is a successful businessman and, on top of that, he is also a philanthropist.”
  • Another example could be, “The restaurant has delicious food and, on top of that, it has a beautiful ambiance.”

19. What’s more

This slang phrase is used to mean “furthermore” or “in addition”. It is often used to introduce another point or emphasize something.

  • For instance, “The product is affordable and, what’s more, it is also eco-friendly.”
  • A person might say, “He is intelligent and, what’s more, he is also incredibly humble.”
  • Another example could be, “The team won the championship and, what’s more, they set a new record.”

20. Withal

This slang term is used to mean “also” or “in addition”. It is often used to indicate that something is included or present.

  • For example, “The company offers great benefits and, withal, it also has a supportive work environment.”
  • A person might say, “He is a talented musician and, withal, he is also an excellent songwriter.”
  • Another example could be, “The movie has a compelling story and, withal, it also has stunning visuals.”

21. Conversely

This word is used to introduce a contrasting or opposite idea or situation. It suggests a different perspective or viewpoint.

  • For example, “She wanted to go out, but conversely, he preferred to stay in.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might say, “Some people believe it’s the right thing to do, while conversely, others argue it’s morally wrong.”
  • When comparing two options, one might say, “Option A is more expensive but conversely, it offers better quality.”

22. Besides

This word is used to add another point or reason to support an idea. It suggests that there is something in addition to what has already been mentioned.

  • For instance, “I don’t have time to go shopping. Besides, I already have enough clothes.”
  • In a conversation about vacation plans, someone might say, “Besides the beach, there are also hiking trails and historical sites to explore.”
  • When discussing the benefits of a particular product, one might mention, “Besides being affordable, it’s also eco-friendly.”

23. More

This word is used to indicate that there is something else to consider or include. It suggests that there is an extra or supplementary aspect to the topic.

  • For example, “I need to buy groceries. More specifically, I need milk, eggs, and bread.”
  • In a discussion about a movie, someone might say, “The plot was engaging, and more importantly, the characters were well-developed.”
  • When talking about a job offer, one might mention, “The salary is competitive, and more importantly, the company offers great benefits.”

24. Inversely

This word is used to introduce an opposite or reverse relationship between two things. It suggests that when one thing increases, the other decreases, and vice versa.

  • For instance, “As the temperature rises, the amount of snow decreases inversely.”
  • In a discussion about supply and demand, someone might say, “As the price of a product increases, the demand for it decreases inversely.”
  • When comparing two variables, one might mention, “Inversely proportional means that when one variable goes up, the other goes down.”

25. Oppositely

This word is used to introduce a contrasting or opposing idea or situation. It suggests that there is a complete difference or contradiction.

  • For example, “She enjoys spicy food, but her brother oppositely prefers mild flavors.”
  • In a discussion about fashion preferences, someone might say, “While some people like bright colors, others oppositely prefer neutral tones.”
  • When comparing two opinions, one might mention, “Some people believe in climate change, while others oppositely deny its existence.”

26. Vice versa

This term is used to indicate that the opposite of what was previously stated is also true. It suggests a reversal or inversion of a previous statement or action.

  • For example, “I thought she didn’t like me, but vice versa, she actually had a crush on me.”
  • In a discussion about cause and effect, one might say, “If you exercise regularly, you’ll be healthier. And vice versa, if you’re unhealthy, you won’t be able to exercise as easily.”
  • A person explaining a rule might say, “In this game, if you hit the ball out of bounds, you lose a point. And vice versa, if you hit the ball within the boundaries, you gain a point.”

27. Variously

This term is used to indicate that something can occur or be done in multiple ways or have different outcomes.

  • For instance, “The artist’s works are variously interpreted by critics and audiences.”
  • In a discussion about job opportunities, one might say, “This company offers variously rewarding careers in different fields.”
  • A person describing a versatile tool might say, “This tool can be used variously for cutting, drilling, and sanding.”

28. Dissimilarly

This term is used to indicate that something is done or occurs in a manner that is different or not similar to what was previously mentioned.

  • For example, “While they both love music, they express their passion dissimilarly.”
  • In a discussion about teaching styles, one might say, “Some students learn best through visual methods, while others learn dissimilarly through hands-on activities.”
  • A person comparing two products might say, “These two smartphones may look similar, but they function dissimilarly in terms of performance and features.”

29. Contrarily

This term is used to indicate that something is done or occurs in a way that is contrary or opposite to what was previously stated or expected.

  • For instance, “She claimed to be a vegetarian, but contrarily, she was caught eating a hamburger.”
  • In a discussion about political beliefs, one might say, “Some people support higher taxes for the wealthy, while others contrarily argue for lower taxes.”
  • A person explaining a contradictory situation might say, “The weather forecast predicted a sunny day, but contrarily, it started raining heavily.”

30. Unequally

This term is used to indicate that something is done or occurs in a manner that is not equal or evenly distributed.

  • For example, “The resources were allocated unequally, resulting in some regions receiving more support than others.”
  • In a discussion about income distribution, one might say, “In many societies, wealth is unequally distributed among the population.”
  • A person describing an unfair treatment might say, “The students were graded unequally, with some receiving higher scores for similar performance.”

31. Diversely

This term is used to indicate that something is added or included along with something else. It is often used to express diversity or variety.

  • For example, “She enjoys painting, writing, and diversely, she also plays the guitar.”
  • In a discussion about different cuisines, someone might say, “Italian, Mexican, and diversely, also Thai food are my favorites.”
  • A person might mention, “I have a passion for photography and diversely, also for hiking and exploring nature.”

32. And

This is the most common and versatile word used to indicate that something is added or included along with something else.

  • For instance, “She enjoys painting and also plays the guitar.”
  • In a conversation about hobbies, someone might say, “I like reading, traveling, and also cooking.”
  • A person might mention, “I have a dog and also a cat as pets.”

33. Plus

This term is used to indicate that something is added or included along with something else. It is often used to emphasize the extra or additional aspect.

  • For example, “She enjoys painting, writing, and plus, she also plays the guitar.”
  • In a discussion about skills, someone might say, “I speak English, Spanish, and plus, also French.”
  • A person might mention, “I have a full-time job and plus, also run my own business.”

34. Similarly

This term is used to indicate that something is added or included along with something else in a similar manner. It is often used to draw comparisons or highlight similarities.

  • For instance, “She enjoys painting, writing, and similarly, she also plays the guitar.”
  • In a conversation about interests, someone might say, “I like hiking, camping, and similarly, also rock climbing.”
  • A person might mention, “I have traveled to Europe, Asia, and similarly, also Africa.”
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