Top 65 Slang For An Italian Guy – Meaning & Usage

Italian guys are known for their charm, style, and passion. And just like any other group, they have their own unique set of slang words and phrases that add a touch of flair to their conversations. In this listicle, we’ve gathered the top slang terms used by Italian guys to help you navigate their linguistic landscape and maybe even impress them with your newfound knowledge. So, whether you’re planning a trip to Italy or just want to expand your vocabulary, get ready to immerse yourself in the language of the Italian stallions!

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1. Mollare qualcuno

This phrase translates to “to leave someone” or “to break up with someone.” It is commonly used to describe ending a romantic relationship.

  • For example, “Ho mollato il mio ragazzo la scorsa settimana” means “I dumped my boyfriend last week.”
  • In a conversation about relationships, someone might say, “Se ti fa stare male, mollalo” which translates to “If he makes you feel bad, dump him.”
  • A friend might ask, “Hai mollato finalmente quella persona?” meaning “Did you finally break up with that person?”

2. Essere nelle nuvole

This phrase is used to describe someone who is daydreaming or not paying attention to their surroundings.

  • For instance, “Oggi sono un po’ nelle nuvole” means “Today I’m a bit in the clouds.”
  • If someone is not listening to a conversation, you might say, “Sei sempre nelle nuvole, vero?” which translates to “Are you always in the clouds, huh?”
  • A teacher might scold a student by saying, “Basta essere nelle nuvole durante la lezione!” meaning “Stop daydreaming during class!”

3. Ricco sfondato

This phrase is used to describe someone who is extremely wealthy or has a lot of money.

  • For example, “Quella famiglia è ricca sfondato” means “That family is filthy rich.”
  • If someone is showing off their expensive possessions, you might say, “Sei davvero ricco sfondato, eh?” which translates to “You’re really filthy rich, huh?”
  • A person might envy someone’s wealth by saying, “Vorrei essere ricco sfondato come lui” meaning “I wish I were filthy rich like him.”

4. Veloce come un razzo

This phrase is used to describe something or someone that is very fast or quick.

  • For instance, “Il treno è veloce come un razzo” means “The train is fast as a rocket.”
  • If someone is running at a high speed, you might say, “Corri veloce come un razzo!” which translates to “Run fast as a rocket!”
  • A person might describe a sports car by saying, “Quella macchina è veloce come un razzo” meaning “That car is fast as a rocket.”

5. Amore a prima vista

This phrase is used to describe the feeling of falling in love with someone or something immediately upon first seeing them.

  • For example, “È stato amore a prima vista quando l’ho incontrato” means “It was love at first sight when I met him.”
  • If someone believes in the concept of love at first sight, they might say, “Credi nell’amore a prima vista?” which translates to “Do you believe in love at first sight?”
  • A person might share their own experience by saying, “Ho provato l’amore a prima vista una volta nella mia vita” meaning “I’ve experienced love at first sight once in my life.”

6. Alito puzzolente

This phrase translates to “stinky breath” in English. It is used to describe someone with bad breath.

  • For example, a person might say, “Mi dispiace, ma hai l’alito puzzolente” which means “I’m sorry, but you have stinky breath.”
  • In a humorous conversation, someone might jokingly say, “Non posso parlare con te, hai l’alito puzzolente!” meaning “I can’t talk to you, you have stinky breath!”

7. Guastafesta

This term is used to describe someone who ruins the fun or dampens the mood at a party or social gathering.

  • For instance, if someone refuses to join in on the dancing and insists on sitting in the corner, they might be called a guastafesta.
  • In a group of friends planning a night out, someone might say, “Let’s not invite John, he’s always such a guastafesta.”
  • If someone is being a buzzkill at a celebration, another person might comment, “Stop being a guastafesta and join in on the fun!”

8. Basta, basta

This phrase is used to indicate that something is sufficient or that someone should stop doing something.

  • For example, if someone keeps talking incessantly, another person might say, “Basta, basta! Non ne posso più!” meaning “Enough, enough! I can’t take it anymore!”
  • In a heated argument, one person might yell, “Basta, basta! Non voglio sentire altro da te!” which translates to “Enough, enough! I don’t want to hear anything else from you!”
  • If someone is being too pushy or demanding, another person might firmly say, “Basta, basta! Non mi interessa!” meaning “Enough, enough! I’m not interested!”

9. Che figo!

This phrase is used to express excitement or admiration for something that is considered cool or impressive.

  • For instance, if someone sees a person driving a fancy sports car, they might exclaim, “Che figo!” meaning “How cool!”
  • When someone shows off a new outfit, another person might comment, “Che figo! Ti sta benissimo!” which translates to “How cool! It looks great on you!”
  • If someone shares a photo of a stunning sunset, another person might respond, “Che figo! Vorrei essere lì!” meaning “How cool! I wish I were there!”

10. Che schifo!

This phrase is used to express disgust or revulsion towards something.

  • For example, if someone sees a pile of garbage on the street, they might exclaim, “Che schifo!” meaning “How disgusting!”
  • When someone tastes a spoiled food, they might say, “Che schifo! Non posso mangiare questo!” which translates to “How disgusting! I can’t eat this!”
  • If someone tells a gross or disturbing story, another person might react with, “Che schifo! Non volevo nemmeno sentirlo!” meaning “How disgusting! I didn’t even want to hear it!”

11. In bocca al lupo

This phrase literally translates to “in the mouth of the wolf” and is used to wish someone good luck. It is often responded to with “crepi il lupo,” which means “may the wolf die.”

  • For example, if someone is about to take a difficult exam, you might say, “In bocca al lupo!”
  • If someone tells you they have a job interview, you can respond with, “In bocca al lupo!”
  • When someone is about to go on stage for a performance, you can wish them luck by saying, “In bocca al lupo!”

12. Fregatura

This word is used to describe a situation where someone is deceived or cheated. It can refer to being scammed or tricked out of money or being taken advantage of in some way.

  • For instance, if someone sells you a fake designer handbag, you might say, “Mi hanno fatto una fregatura!”
  • If someone tells you a deal is too good to be true and it turns out to be a scam, you can say, “Ho fatto una fregatura!”
  • When someone shares a story about being tricked or deceived, you can respond with, “Che fregatura!”

13. Figurati!

This phrase is used to respond to someone who thanks you. It can be translated as “don’t mention it” or “you’re welcome” and is a polite way to acknowledge someone’s gratitude.

  • For example, if someone says, “Grazie!” you can respond with, “Figurati!”
  • When someone thanks you for helping them, you can say, “Figurati, è stato un piacere!”
  • If someone expresses their appreciation for something you did, you can reply with, “Figurati, sono felice di poterti aiutare!”

14. Devo filare

This phrase is used to indicate that you have to leave or go somewhere. It can be used in casual conversations or more formal situations.

  • For instance, if you’re at a party and need to leave, you can say, “Mi dispiace, devo filare.”
  • When you’re on the phone and need to end the conversation, you can say, “Scusa, devo filare.”
  • If someone asks you to stay longer but you have other plans, you can politely say, “Mi piacerebbe, ma devo filare.”

15. Che cavolo

This phrase is used to express surprise, frustration, or confusion. It can be translated as “what the heck” or “what on earth” and is a milder alternative to stronger expletives.

  • For example, if someone tells you an unbelievable story, you might respond with, “Che cavolo!”
  • When you’re trying to figure out a difficult problem, you can say, “Ma che cavolo devo fare?”
  • If something unexpected happens and you’re caught off guard, you can exclaim, “Che cavolo sta succedendo?”

16. Cascasse il mondo

This phrase is used to express that something is highly unlikely or improbable. It is often used in a sarcastic or exaggerated manner.

  • For example, if someone says, “I’ll finish all my work by tomorrow, cascasse il mondo,” they mean that it’s highly unlikely they will be able to complete their work in such a short time.
  • In a conversation about someone’s procrastination habits, one might say, “He always leaves everything until the last minute, cascasse il mondo.”
  • A person might use this phrase to express their disbelief in a statement or promise, such as, “If you think I’ll lend you money again, cascasse il mondo.”

17. I vecchi

This phrase is used to refer to older people, often in a respectful or endearing way. It can also be used to refer to older generations or traditions.

  • For instance, if someone says, “I love spending time with i vecchi. They have so much wisdom to share,” they are referring to older individuals.
  • In a discussion about family traditions, one might say, “We always celebrate Christmas with i vecchi. It’s a special time.”
  • A person might use this phrase to express their respect for older generations, such as, “We should listen to i vecchi. They have experienced so much in life.”

18. Mannaggia

This is an exclamation used to express frustration, annoyance, or disappointment. It is often used in casual conversation or when something goes wrong.

  • For example, if someone accidentally spills their coffee, they might say, “Mannaggia!” to express their frustration.
  • In a conversation about a difficult situation, one might say, “Mannaggia, I can’t believe this happened.”
  • A person might use this exclamation when they receive disappointing news, such as, “Mannaggia, I didn’t get the job I wanted.”

19. Guido

This term is used to describe a stereotypical Italian-American male. It is often associated with a particular style, attitude, and appearance.

  • For instance, if someone says, “He’s such a guido with his slicked-back hair and gold chains,” they are referring to someone who fits the stereotypical image.
  • In a discussion about cultural stereotypes, one might say, “The guido stereotype perpetuates negative stereotypes about Italian-Americans.”
  • A person might use this term to describe someone’s behavior or fashion choices, such as, “He’s acting like a guido with his loud and flashy personality.”

20. Paisan

This term is used to refer to a friend or fellow Italian. It is often used in a friendly and affectionate manner.

  • For example, if someone says, “Hey paisan, how’s it going?” they are addressing their friend or fellow Italian.
  • In a conversation about a group of Italian friends, one might say, “We’re all paisans here.”
  • A person might use this term to express their camaraderie with someone, such as, “We’re paisans, we stick together.”

21. Mafioso

A mafioso is a member of the Italian-American organized crime syndicate known as the Mafia. The term is often used to refer to someone involved in criminal activities, particularly those associated with organized crime.

  • For example, in a movie about the Mafia, a character might say, “He’s a dangerous mafioso, you don’t want to mess with him.”
  • In a discussion about organized crime, someone might mention, “The mafioso has a strict code of conduct and hierarchy.”
  • A journalist reporting on a Mafia-related story might write, “The police arrested several suspected mafiosi in a recent raid.”

22. Wise guy

A wise guy is a term used to describe someone who is street-smart and clever, often with a quick wit and sharp tongue. It can also refer to someone who is involved in illegal activities or has connections to the Mafia.

  • For instance, in a mob movie, a character might say, “He’s a wise guy, always coming up with clever schemes.”
  • In a conversation about someone who talks back or challenges authority, someone might comment, “He’s a real wise guy, always questioning everything.”
  • A comedian might use the term to describe themselves, saying, “I like to think of myself as a wise guy, always ready with a funny comeback.”

23. Stallion

A stallion is a term used to describe a man who is attractive, charismatic, and sexually appealing. It often implies a sense of virility and power.

  • For example, in a romantic movie, a character might say, “He’s a real stallion, all the ladies are attracted to him.”
  • In a conversation about someone who is confident and successful with women, someone might comment, “He’s a total stallion, always surrounded by beautiful women.”
  • A person describing their ideal partner might say, “I’m looking for a tall, dark, and handsome stallion.”

24. Don

A don is a term used to refer to a respected leader or boss, particularly in Italian-American organized crime families. It can also be used more generally to describe someone who is in a position of power or authority.

  • For instance, in a Mafia movie, a character might say, “He’s the don, everyone respects and fears him.”
  • In a discussion about a powerful figure in a particular industry, someone might comment, “He’s the don of the tech world, everyone looks up to him.”
  • A person describing their boss or supervisor might say, “She’s the don of our department, always making sure everything runs smoothly.”

25. Capo

A capo is a high-ranking member of the Italian-American Mafia who is in charge of a crew or group of criminals. The term is often used to refer to someone who is in a position of authority or leadership within a criminal organization.

  • For example, in a mob movie, a character might say, “He’s the capo of the family, everyone reports to him.”
  • In a discussion about the structure of the Mafia, someone might explain, “The capo is responsible for overseeing the activities of their crew.”
  • A person describing someone who is influential and respected might say, “He’s a capo in his industry, everyone listens to what he says.”

26. Goombah

This term is often used to refer to a close friend or associate, especially within Italian-American communities. It can also be used as a term of endearment.

  • For example, “Hey, goombah, let’s grab a pizza tonight.”
  • A person might say, “Me and my goombahs are heading to the game.”
  • In a conversation about childhood friends, someone might say, “I’ve known my goombah since we were kids.”

27. Paisano

This term is used to refer to a fellow Italian, someone who shares the same cultural background or heritage.

  • For instance, “Hey paisano, do you know any good Italian restaurants in the area?”
  • A person might say, “I met a fellow paisano at the Italian festival.”
  • In a conversation about cultural identity, someone might say, “It’s always nice to meet a paisano when you’re traveling abroad.”

28. Gino

This term is often used to describe an Italian man who has a certain style or attitude. It can be used both positively and negatively, depending on the context.

  • For example, “That guy is such a gino, always dressed to impress.”
  • A person might say, “I love the way he carries himself, he’s a true gino.”
  • In a conversation about stereotypes, someone might say, “Not all Italians are ginos, you know.”

29. Vinny

This term is a common nickname for an Italian man named Vincent. It is often used as a familiar or friendly way to address someone.

  • For instance, “Hey Vinny, how’s it going?”
  • A person might say, “Vinny and I have been friends since high school.”
  • In a conversation about family names, someone might say, “Vinny is short for Vincent, it’s a common nickname.”

30. Tony

This term is a common nickname for an Italian man named Anthony. It is often used as a familiar or friendly way to address someone.

  • For example, “Hey Tony, long time no see!”
  • A person might say, “Tony and I go way back, we grew up in the same neighborhood.”
  • In a conversation about Italian names, someone might say, “Tony is a popular nickname for Anthony.”

31. Luigi

Luigi is a common Italian name and is often used as a slang term to refer to an Italian guy. It can be used to describe someone who is charming, confident, and attractive.

  • For example, “Look at Luigi over there, he’s such a ladies’ man.”
  • In a conversation about Italian stereotypes, someone might say, “Luigi is the epitome of an Italian guy.”
  • A friend might tease, “Hey Luigi, how many hearts did you break today?”

32. Giuseppe

Giuseppe is another common Italian name and is sometimes used as a slang term for an Italian guy. It can be used to describe someone who is stylish, sophisticated, and well-connected.

  • For instance, “Giuseppe always knows the best places to eat in town.”
  • In a discussion about Italian fashion, someone might say, “Giuseppe’s style is on point.”
  • A friend might compliment, “You’re such a G-Man, Giuseppe.”

33. Mario

Mario is a popular Italian name and is often used as a slang term for an Italian guy. It can be used to describe someone who is energetic, adventurous, and charismatic.

  • For example, “Mario is always the life of the party.”
  • In a conversation about Italian culture, someone might say, “Mario embodies the Italian spirit.”
  • A friend might exclaim, “You’re a real Super Mario, always up for an adventure!”

34. Salvatore

Salvatore is a common Italian name and is sometimes used as a slang term for an Italian guy. It can be used to describe someone who is loyal, dependable, and hardworking.

  • For instance, “Salvatore is always there to lend a helping hand.”
  • In a discussion about Italian family values, someone might say, “Sal embodies the importance of family.”
  • A friend might say, “You can always count on Sal, he’s a true friend.”

35. Vito

Vito is another common Italian name and is often used as a slang term for an Italian guy. It can be used to describe someone who is powerful, influential, and respected.

  • For example, “Vito has connections all over the city.”
  • In a conversation about Italian mob movies, someone might say, “Vito is like a real-life Don.”
  • A friend might joke, “Watch out, Vito might make you an offer you can’t refuse.”

36. Carmine

This is a nickname or slang term for a person named Carmine, often used affectionately or informally.

  • For example, “Hey Carm, do you want to grab a pizza later?”
  • A friend might say, “Carmine is always the life of the party.”
  • Someone might introduce Carmine as, “This is my buddy, Carm. He’s Italian and makes the best pasta.”

37. Rocco

This is a nickname or slang term for a person named Rocco, often used as a sign of familiarity or friendship.

  • For instance, “Hey Rocky, how’s it going?”
  • A friend might say, “Rocco is a great guy to have on your side.”
  • Someone might introduce Rocco as, “This is Rocky, my Italian friend. He knows all the best restaurants.”

38. Franco

This is a nickname or slang term for a person named Franco, often used as a shortened or familiar version of their name.

  • For example, “Hey Frank, can you help me with this?”
  • A friend might say, “Franco is always up for an adventure.”
  • Someone might introduce Franco as, “This is Frank, my Italian buddy. He’s a great chef.”

39. Angelo

This is a nickname or slang term for a person named Angelo, often used as a shortened or familiar version of their name.

  • For instance, “Hey Ange, want to catch a movie tonight?”
  • A friend might say, “Angelo is the most stylish guy I know.”
  • Someone might introduce Angelo as, “This is Ange, my Italian friend. He’s a talented artist.”

40. Giovanni

This is a nickname or slang term for a person named Giovanni, often used as a shortened or familiar version of their name.

  • For example, “Hey Gio, let’s grab some gelato.”
  • A friend might say, “Giovanni is a natural-born leader.”
  • Someone might introduce Giovanni as, “This is Gio, my Italian buddy. He’s a fantastic soccer player.”

41. Enzo

Enzo is a common nickname for the Italian name Lorenzo. It is often used to refer to an Italian guy named Lorenzo in an informal and friendly way.

  • For example, “Hey Enzo, how’s it going?”
  • A group of friends might say, “Let’s meet up with Enzo later.”
  • When introducing someone, you might say, “This is my friend Enzo.”

42. Roberto

Roberto is a common Italian name that can be used as a slang term to refer to an Italian guy named Roberto in a casual and familiar manner.

  • For instance, “Hey Roberto, want to grab a pizza?”
  • A friend might say, “Roberto is the best cook I know.”
  • When talking about someone, you might say, “I saw Roberto at the party last night.”

43. Marco

Marco is a common Italian name that can be used as a slang term to refer to an Italian guy named Marco in a casual and friendly way.

  • For example, “Hey Marco, let’s go watch the game.”
  • A group of friends might say, “Marco always knows the best places to eat.”
  • When mentioning someone, you might say, “I bumped into Marco at the mall.”

44. Fabio

Fabio is a common Italian name that can be used as a slang term to refer to an Italian guy named Fabio in a playful and lighthearted manner.

  • For instance, “Hey Fabio, you’re looking stylish today.”
  • A friend might say, “Fabio is the smoothest guy I know.”
  • When teasing someone, you might say, “Nice hair, Fabio.”

45. Paolo

Paolo is a common Italian name that can be used as a slang term to refer to an Italian guy named Paolo in a casual and familiar way.

  • For example, “Hey Paolo, let’s grab some gelato.”
  • A group of friends might say, “Paolo is always up for an adventure.”
  • When talking about someone, you might say, “I heard Paolo is a great guitarist.”

46. Bruno

This is a casual term used to refer to a male friend or acquaintance. In the context of slang for an Italian guy, “Bruno” can be used as a nickname or a way to address someone informally.

  • For example, “Hey Bruno, wanna grab a pizza later?”
  • A group of friends might say, “Bruno is always the life of the party.”
  • In a conversation about Italian culture, someone might mention, “Bruno is such a stereotypically Italian name.”

47. Antonio

“Tony” is a common nickname for the name “Antonio.” It is often used to refer to a person named Antonio in a friendly or informal manner.

  • For instance, “Hey Tony, how’s it going?”
  • In a discussion about Italian names, someone might say, “Antonio is such a classic Italian name. I bet everyone calls him Tony.”
  • A friend might mention, “Tony makes the best homemade pasta.”

48. Stefano

In the context of slang for an Italian guy, “Steve” is an English nickname that can be used to refer to someone named Stefano in a casual or friendly way.

  • For example, “Steve, can you pass me the sauce?”
  • In a conversation about Italian names, someone might say, “Stefano is such a cool name. I wonder if he goes by Steve.”
  • A friend might mention, “Steve is always up for trying new Italian restaurants.”

49. Matteo

“Matt” is a common nickname for the name “Matteo.” It is often used to refer to a person named Matteo in an informal or friendly manner.

  • For instance, “Hey Matt, want to grab a coffee?”
  • In a discussion about Italian names, someone might say, “Matteo is such a stylish name. I wonder if he goes by Matt.”
  • A friend might mention, “Matt has the best fashion sense.”

50. Alessandro

In the context of slang for an Italian guy, “Alex” is an English nickname that can be used to refer to someone named Alessandro in a casual or friendly way.

  • For example, “Hey Alex, let’s go watch the game.”
  • In a conversation about Italian names, someone might say, “Alessandro is such a strong name. I wonder if he goes by Alex.”
  • A friend might mention, “Alex is a great cook.”

51. Leonardo

A common nickname for an Italian guy named Leonardo. It is derived from the first name and is often used as a short form of addressing or referring to someone named Leonardo.

  • For example, “Hey Leo, let’s grab some pizza tonight.”
  • A friend might say, “Leo, you’re always the life of the party.”
  • Someone might introduce themselves as “Hi,“Hi, I’m Leo.”

52. Francesco

A popular nickname for an Italian guy named Francesco. It is a shorter form of the name and is commonly used as a familiar way of addressing or referring to someone named Francesco.

  • For instance, “Hey Franco, have you tried the new gelato place?”
  • A friend might say, “Franco, you’re always up for an adventure.”
  • Someone might introduce themselves as “Hi,“Hi, I’m Franco.”

53. Giorgio

A common nickname for an Italian guy named Giorgio. It is a shortened version of the name and is often used as a casual way of addressing or referring to someone named Giorgio.

  • For example, “Hey Gio, let’s go watch the soccer game.”
  • A friend might say, “Gio, you have great taste in music.”
  • Someone might introduce themselves as “Hi,“Hi, I’m Gio.”

54. Marcello

A popular nickname for an Italian guy named Marcello. It is a shortened form of the name and is commonly used as a friendly way of addressing or referring to someone named Marcello.

  • For instance, “Hey Marc, want to grab a coffee?”
  • A friend might say, “Marc, you always know the best restaurants.”
  • Someone might introduce themselves as “Hi,“Hi, I’m Marc.”

55. Domenico

A common nickname for an Italian guy named Domenico. It is a shortened version of the name and is often used as a casual way of addressing or referring to someone named Domenico.

  • For example, “Hey Dom, let’s go for a bike ride.”
  • A friend might say, “Dom, you’re the best at fixing things.”
  • Someone might introduce themselves as “Hi,“Hi, I’m Dom.”

56. Wop

This is a derogatory term used to refer to an Italian person. It originated in the early 20th century and was used to stereotype and discriminate against Italian immigrants.

  • For example, “He’s just a wop, he doesn’t know anything about good food.”
  • In a conversation about ethnicity, someone might say, “I can’t believe people still use the term wop.”
  • Another person might warn, “Using the term wop is offensive and disrespectful.”

57. Dago

Similar to “wop,” dago is a derogatory term used to refer to an Italian person. It is also an ethnic slur that originated in the early 20th century.

  • For instance, “Those damn dagos are taking all the jobs.”
  • In a discussion about discrimination, someone might say, “My grandfather faced a lot of prejudice because he was called a dago.”
  • Another person might comment, “Using slurs like dago is never acceptable.”

58. Greaseball

This is an offensive term used to describe an Italian person. It is derogatory and implies negative stereotypes about Italians, such as being dirty or unkempt.

  • For example, “Look at that greaseball, he needs a shower.”
  • In a conversation about stereotypes, someone might say, “It’s unfair to label all Italians as greaseballs.”
  • Another person might argue, “Using offensive terms like greaseball perpetuates harmful stereotypes.”

59. Frankie

Frankie is a common nickname for Italian men named Frank or Francesco. It is a casual and friendly way to address someone with an Italian background.

  • For instance, “Hey Frankie, how’s it going?”
  • In a discussion about nicknames, someone might say, “I have a friend named Frankie, it’s short for Francesco.”
  • Another person might comment, “I love the name Frankie, it has a cool and friendly vibe.”

60. Pasquale

Pasquale is a traditional Italian name often given to boys born around Easter. It has religious connotations and is derived from the Latin word “Paschalis,” meaning “of Easter.”

  • For example, “Pasquale is a popular name in my Italian family.”
  • In a conversation about Italian names, someone might say, “I’ve always liked the name Pasquale, it’s unique.”
  • Another person might comment, “I once met a guy named Pasquale, he was proud of his Italian heritage.”

61. Aldo

Aldo is a slang term used to refer to an attractive and charismatic Italian guy. It is often used to describe someone who exudes confidence and charm.

  • For example, a person might say, “Did you see that guy at the party? He’s such an Aldo.”
  • In a conversation about dating, someone might mention, “I went on a date with this Aldo last night, and he was so charming.”
  • A friend might compliment another by saying, “You’re like the Aldo of our group, always catching everyone’s attention.”

62. Dante

Dante is a slang term used to describe an Italian guy who is smooth, suave, and knows how to charm others. It is often associated with someone who is confident and charismatic.

  • For instance, a person might say, “Dante approached me at the bar and swept me off my feet.”
  • In a discussion about flirting techniques, someone might mention, “You should learn from Dante, he’s a smooth operator.”
  • A friend might tease another by saying, “You think you’re Dante, always trying to charm everyone you meet.”

63. Sergio

Sergio is a slang term used to refer to an attractive and desirable Italian guy. It is often used to describe someone who is considered a heartthrob or a romantic interest.

  • For example, a person might say, “Sergio is the ultimate heartthrob, all the girls have a crush on him.”
  • In a conversation about celebrity crushes, someone might mention, “My celebrity crush is Sergio, he’s so dreamy.”
  • A friend might tease another by saying, “You wish you were a Sergio, always breaking hearts wherever you go.”

64. Vincenzo

Vincenzo is a slang term used to describe an Italian guy who embodies the qualities of a gentleman. It is often associated with someone who is polite, respectful, and chivalrous.

  • For instance, a person might say, “Vincenzo opened the door for me, he’s such a gentleman.”
  • In a discussion about manners and etiquette, someone might mention, “You should learn from Vincenzo, he knows how to treat a lady.”
  • A friend might compliment another by saying, “You’re like a Vincenzo, always making sure everyone feels valued and respected.”

65. Federico

Federico is a slang term used to describe an Italian guy who has a great sense of style and fashion. It is often associated with someone who pays attention to their appearance and follows the latest fashion trends.

  • For example, a person might say, “Federico always looks so stylish, he’s a true fashionista.”
  • In a conversation about fashion influencers, someone might mention, “Federico is like the Italian version of a fashion icon.”
  • A friend might compliment another by saying, “You have the fashion sense of Federico, always ahead of the trends.”
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