Top 105 Slang For Anchor – Meaning & Usage

Anchors, whether in the newsroom or on social media, play a crucial role in keeping us grounded and informed. But have you ever wondered what slang terms are used to describe these important figures? Join us as we uncover the top slang for anchor that will have you nodding in agreement and maybe even picking up a new phrase or two to add to your vocabulary arsenal!

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1. Mainstay

Refers to something or someone that is a constant and reliable source of support or stability. It can be used to describe a person, organization, or even an idea.

  • For example, “My best friend has been my mainstay throughout all the ups and downs of life.”
  • In a discussion about a successful business, one might say, “Customer satisfaction is the mainstay of our company.”
  • A sports commentator might describe a star player as “the mainstay of the team.”

2. Rock

Used to describe someone or something that provides unwavering support and stability in difficult times. The term implies strength and dependability.

  • For instance, “My parents have always been my rock, supporting me no matter what.”
  • In a conversation about a reliable coworker, one might say, “She’s a rock in the office, always willing to lend a hand.”
  • A friend might say, “You can always count on him, he’s a rock.”

3. Backbone

Refers to the central or fundamental support of something. It suggests that the anchor is the backbone of a structure, providing strength and stability.

  • For example, “The teacher is the backbone of the education system, shaping young minds.”
  • In a discussion about a successful project, one might say, “Effective communication is the backbone of our team.”
  • A manager might emphasize, “The backbone of any organization is its employees.”

4. Pillar

Describes something or someone that provides strong support and stability, much like a pillar holds up a structure. It suggests that the anchor is an essential component of the overall system.

  • For instance, “The community center is a pillar of the neighborhood, providing essential services.”
  • In a conversation about a reliable friend, one might say, “She’s a pillar of strength, always there when you need her.”
  • A mentor might say, “Integrity is the pillar of success.”

5. Foundation

Refers to the base or groundwork upon which something is built. It signifies the essential support that anchors and sustains the rest of the structure.

  • For example, “Trust is the foundation of any healthy relationship.”
  • In a discussion about a successful business, one might say, “Strong financial management is the foundation of our company.”
  • A teacher might emphasize, “Reading skills are the foundation for academic success.”

6. Stay

To stay means to hold steady or remain in a fixed position. It can refer to an anchor’s ability to keep a vessel in place or to a person’s ability to remain grounded and stable.

  • For example, a sailor might say, “Drop the anchor and let it stay in place.”
  • In a metaphorical sense, someone might say, “I need to stay focused on my goals.”
  • Another might advise, “Stay true to yourself and your values.”

7. Mooring

Mooring refers to the act of securing a vessel in place with the use of ropes or cables attached to an anchor or a fixed point on land. In a metaphorical sense, it can also refer to being tied down or restricted in some way.

  • For instance, a sailor might say, “We need to find a good mooring spot for the night.”
  • In a figurative sense, someone might say, “I feel like I’m moored to my desk all day.”
  • Another might express frustration by saying, “I’m tired of feeling moored by my responsibilities.”

8. Grounding

Grounding refers to the act of securing a vessel to the ground or a solid surface, often using an anchor. In a metaphorical sense, it can also refer to finding stability or a sense of rootedness.

  • For example, a sailor might say, “The ship is grounding itself in the harbor.”
  • In a figurative sense, someone might say, “Yoga helps me find grounding and inner peace.”
  • Another might seek grounding by spending time in nature, saying, “I need to go for a walk to find some grounding.”

9. Stability

Stability refers to the quality of being firm, steady, and secure. In the context of anchoring, it refers to an anchor’s ability to keep a vessel steady and prevent it from drifting or moving.

  • For instance, a sailor might say, “The anchor provides stability in rough seas.”
  • In a personal sense, someone might say, “I need to find stability in my career.”
  • Another might seek stability in a relationship, saying, “Trust and communication are key for relationship stability.”

10. Secure

Secure means to fasten or fix something firmly in place. In the context of anchoring, it refers to the act of properly attaching an anchor to a vessel or a fixed point on land to ensure stability and prevent drifting.

  • For example, a sailor might say, “Secure the anchor to the bow of the boat.”
  • In a figurative sense, someone might say, “I need to secure my financial future.”
  • Another might seek to secure a relationship by saying, “I want to build a strong and secure partnership.”

11. Hold

To keep something in place or prevent it from moving or falling. In the context of anchor slang, “hold” refers to the act of securing an object or ensuring its stability.

  • For example, a sailor might say, “Make sure you hold onto the anchor rope tightly.”
  • In a discussion about boating, someone might ask, “How do you hold the anchor in place during rough waters?”
  • A person giving instructions might say, “Hold the anchor steady while I lower it into the water.”

12. Grip

To firmly hold onto something. In anchor slang, “grip” refers to the act of grasping or holding onto the anchor or its components.

  • For instance, a sailor might say, “Get a good grip on the anchor chain before lowering it.”
  • In a conversation about boat maintenance, someone might ask, “How do you properly grip the anchor when pulling it up?”
  • A person giving advice might say, “Make sure your grip on the anchor is strong to avoid accidents.”

13. Dock

To bring a boat or ship to a specific location and secure it in place. In anchor slang, “dock” refers to the act of bringing the anchor to a dock or mooring spot.

  • For example, a captain might say, “We need to dock the anchor at the marina before going ashore.”
  • In a discussion about boating safety, someone might ask, “What’s the proper way to dock the anchor without damaging the boat?”
  • A person giving instructions might say, “Slowly approach the dock and carefully dock the anchor to avoid collisions.”

14. Fasten

To attach or fix something in place. In anchor slang, “fasten” refers to the act of securely attaching the anchor to the boat or any other object.

  • For instance, a sailor might say, “Make sure you fasten the anchor to the bow of the boat.”
  • In a conversation about anchor maintenance, someone might ask, “What’s the best way to fasten the anchor to prevent it from coming loose?”
  • A person giving advice might say, “Always double-check that the anchor is properly fastened before setting sail.”

15. Settle

To make something stable or steady. In the context of anchor slang, “settle” refers to the act of allowing the anchor to sink into the seabed and establish a stable position.

  • For example, a boater might say, “Wait for the anchor to settle before tying off the rope.”
  • In a discussion about anchoring techniques, someone might ask, “How long does it take for the anchor to settle in different types of seabeds?”
  • A person giving instructions might say, “Gently lower the anchor and let it settle into the sand for better holding power.”

16. Steady

In the context of an anchor, “steady” refers to someone who is reliable, consistent, and unwavering in their performance. It implies that the anchor can be counted on to deliver the news or information in a steady and confident manner.

  • For example, a viewer might say, “I always trust the steady delivery of news from that anchor.”
  • When discussing different news anchors, someone might comment, “She’s known for her steady presence on screen.”
  • A producer might say, “We need an anchor who can keep the audience engaged with their steady delivery.”

17. Grounded

When referring to an anchor, “grounded” means that they have a humble and approachable demeanor. It suggests that the anchor is relatable and able to connect with the audience on a personal level.

  • For instance, a viewer might say, “I like how grounded the anchor seems. They don’t come across as arrogant.”
  • During a discussion about news anchors, someone might mention, “She has a grounded personality that resonates with viewers.”
  • A producer might look for an anchor who can bring a grounded perspective to the news.

18. Anchorite

An “anchorite” is someone who is completely devoted to their work or profession, often to the point of isolating themselves from other aspects of life. In the context of an anchor, it implies that they are fully committed to their role and prioritize their work above other things.

  • For example, a viewer might say, “He’s such an anchorite. You can tell he lives and breathes journalism.”
  • When discussing the dedication of news anchors, someone might comment, “She’s definitely an anchorite, always putting in extra hours to deliver the news.”
  • A producer might seek out an anchorite who is willing to go above and beyond in their commitment to the job.

19. Anchorwoman

“Anchorwoman” is a term specifically used to refer to a female anchor. It is a gender-specific term that distinguishes women who anchor news broadcasts or other programs.

  • For instance, someone might say, “She’s the first anchorwoman to host the evening news in this network.”
  • When discussing the representation of women in media, someone might comment, “We need more anchorwomen to provide diverse perspectives.”
  • A producer might be looking to hire an anchorwoman to bring a fresh and female voice to their news program.

20. Anchorperson

The term “anchorperson” is a gender-neutral alternative to “anchorwoman” or “anchorman.” It is used to refer to any individual who anchors news broadcasts or other programs, regardless of their gender.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s a talented anchorperson who has years of experience in the industry.”
  • During a discussion about the role of anchors, someone might comment, “It’s important to have diverse anchorpersons who can connect with different audiences.”
  • A producer might be looking for an anchorperson who can bring a fresh perspective to their news program.

21. Anchorless

Refers to something or someone that is not anchored or does not have an anchor. It can be used metaphorically to describe a person who is not tied down or settled in one place.

  • For example, “After quitting her job, she felt anchorless and unsure of what to do next.”
  • In a discussion about stability, someone might say, “Without a strong foundation, a relationship can become anchorless.”
  • A traveler might describe their lifestyle as anchorless, saying, “I love the freedom of being anchorless and exploring new places.”

22. Anchorable

Describes something that can be anchored or secured in place. It implies that there is a possibility or potential for something to be anchored.

  • For instance, “The boat has anchorable cleats to secure it to the dock.”
  • In a conversation about safety, someone might say, “Make sure the ladder is anchorable before climbing.”
  • A furniture assembly instruction might state, “Ensure that the bookshelf is anchorable to the wall for stability.”

23. Anchorful

Refers to something that is abundant with anchors or has a significant number of anchors. It can be used to describe a place or object that provides a strong sense of stability or security.

  • For example, “The harbor is anchorful with boats of all sizes.”
  • In a discussion about relationships, someone might say, “A strong partnership is anchorful and provides support.”
  • A person describing their home might say, “I love my anchorful house, it feels safe and secure.”

24. Anchorly

Describes an action or behavior that resembles or imitates the qualities of an anchor. It can be used metaphorically to convey a sense of stability, reliability, or steadfastness.

  • For instance, “He held onto his beliefs anchorly, despite opposition.”
  • In a conversation about support, someone might say, “She always stands anchorly by her friends.”
  • A leader might be described as anchorly, with someone saying, “He guides the team anchorly and keeps them focused.”

25. Anchorwise

Refers to an action or approach that takes into account the presence or use of an anchor. It implies a thoughtful or deliberate consideration of anchoring.

  • For example, “When setting up the tent, make sure to secure it anchorwise.”
  • In a discussion about safety precautions, someone might say, “Always approach the task anchorwise to avoid accidents.”
  • A sailor might describe their navigation as anchorwise, saying, “I plan my routes anchorwise to ensure safe passage.”

26. Anchoristic

This term refers to something that is similar to or resembles an anchor. It can be used to describe an object, a person’s behavior, or a situation.

  • For example, “The strong and sturdy building acted as an anchoristic presence in the neighborhood.”
  • In a discussion about relationships, someone might say, “Having a stable and supportive partner can provide an anchoristic influence in your life.”
  • A person describing their favorite book might say, “The protagonist’s unwavering determination served as an anchoristic force throughout the story.”

27. Drag

In the context of anchoring, “drag” refers to the resistance experienced by the anchor as it moves along the seabed. It is the force that opposes the anchor’s movement and helps it to stay in place.

  • For instance, a sailor might say, “The anchor held fast despite the strong drag caused by the strong currents.”
  • In a discussion about boat anchoring techniques, someone might mention, “Using a heavier anchor can help reduce drag and provide better holding power.”
  • A person describing their experience during a storm might say, “The boat was constantly shifting due to the drag on the anchor.”

28. Holdfast

A “holdfast” is a term used to describe an anchor’s ability to grip or hold onto the seabed. It refers to the anchor’s ability to stay in place and provide stability.

  • For example, a sailor might say, “The anchor’s holdfast was strong enough to withstand the rough seas.”
  • In a discussion about different types of anchors, someone might mention, “A fluke anchor provides a reliable holdfast in sandy or muddy bottoms.”
  • A person describing their experience during a boating trip might say, “We had to reposition the anchor several times until we found a good holdfast.”

29. Ground tackle

In boating terminology, “ground tackle” refers to the equipment used for anchoring a vessel. It includes the anchor, chain or rope, and any other components necessary for securing the boat in place.

  • For instance, a sailor might say, “Make sure you have a reliable ground tackle before setting out on a long journey.”
  • In a discussion about boat maintenance, someone might mention, “Regularly inspecting and maintaining your ground tackle is essential for safe anchoring.”
  • A person giving advice to a new boat owner might say, “Investing in high-quality ground tackle is worth it for peace of mind while anchoring.”

30. Hook

In the context of anchoring, “hook” refers to the action of the anchor securing itself to the seabed. It is the process of the anchor catching onto the bottom and creating a secure attachment.

  • For example, a sailor might say, “Once the anchor hooks onto the rocky bottom, it provides a stable hold.”
  • In a discussion about anchoring techniques, someone might mention, “Gently reverse the boat to ensure the anchor hooks properly.”
  • A person describing their experience during a boating trip might say, “After a few attempts, the anchor finally hooked and we felt secure.”

31. Irons

In nautical slang, “irons” refers to the chains or hooks that are used to secure an anchor in place. The term can also be used to refer to the anchor itself.

  • For example, a sailor might say, “Drop the irons and let’s secure the boat.”
  • In a discussion about boat equipment, someone might ask, “What type of irons do you use for your anchor?”
  • Another might comment, “I prefer using heavy-duty irons for added security.”

32. Mud hook

In maritime slang, “mud hook” is another term for an anchor. It is derived from the fact that anchors are often used to secure a boat in muddy or sediment-filled waters.

  • For instance, a sailor might say, “Drop the mud hook and let’s stay here for the night.”
  • In a conversation about boating, someone might ask, “Do you have a reliable mud hook for anchoring?”
  • Another might comment, “I always carry a spare mud hook, just in case.”

33. Pick

In nautical jargon, “pick” is a slang term for an anchor. The term is derived from the action of dropping or “picking” the anchor to secure a boat in place.

  • For example, a sailor might say, “Let’s drop the pick and stay here for a while.”
  • In a discussion about sailing, someone might ask, “Do you have a reliable pick for anchoring?”
  • Another might comment, “Make sure to properly stow the pick when not in use.”

34. Stock

In boating slang, “stock” is a term used to refer to an anchor. The term is derived from the fact that anchors often have a stock or shank that connects the flukes to the crown.

  • For instance, a sailor might say, “Bring up the stock and let’s prepare to anchor.”
  • In a conversation about boat equipment, someone might ask, “What type of stock do you have on your anchor?”
  • Another might comment, “A sturdy stock is essential for a reliable anchor.”

35. Bower

In maritime jargon, “bower” is a term used to refer to the primary anchor on a boat. The bower anchor is typically the largest and most reliable anchor on board.

  • For example, a sailor might say, “Let’s drop the bower and secure the boat.”
  • In a discussion about anchoring techniques, someone might ask, “How do you properly set the bower?”
  • Another might comment, “The bower anchor should always be ready for immediate use.”

36. Kedge

A kedge is a smaller anchor used in addition to the main anchor. It is often used to provide extra stability or to hold a vessel in a specific position.

  • For example, “We dropped the kedge anchor to keep the boat from drifting in the strong current.”
  • In a sailing race, a competitor might say, “We used the kedge anchor to hold our position while waiting for the race to start.”
  • A sailor discussing anchoring techniques might mention, “Using a kedge anchor can help prevent the boat from swinging too much in high winds.”

37. Fluke

The fluke is the flat, pointed part of an anchor that digs into the seabed to secure the vessel. It is also known as the anchor arm.

  • For instance, “The anchor’s fluke got caught on a rock, preventing the boat from drifting.”
  • In a boating discussion, someone might ask, “How deep should the fluke be buried in the sand for optimal holding?”
  • A sailor might explain, “The fluke’s design and weight distribution determine how well the anchor will hold in different conditions.”

38. Grapnel

A grapnel is a small anchor with multiple hooks or flukes. It is commonly used for temporary anchoring or for securing small boats.

  • For example, “We used a grapnel anchor to keep the dinghy from drifting away while we went ashore.”
  • In a fishing discussion, someone might say, “A grapnel anchor is handy for holding the boat in place while you fish.”
  • A boater might mention, “I always carry a grapnel anchor as a backup in case the main anchor fails.”

39. CQR

CQR is a type of anchor known as a plow anchor. It is designed to dig into the seabed and provide excellent holding power.

  • For instance, “The CQR anchor held our boat securely even in strong winds.”
  • In a boating conversation, someone might recommend, “Consider using a CQR anchor for its reliable performance.”
  • A sailor might explain, “The CQR anchor’s shape allows it to bury itself in the seabed, providing a strong grip.”

40. Danforth

A Danforth anchor is a type of anchor with two large, flat flukes. It is known for its efficiency in sandy or muddy bottoms.

  • For example, “We used a Danforth anchor to secure the boat in the soft mud.”
  • In a sailing discussion, someone might ask, “Is a Danforth anchor suitable for rocky seabeds?”
  • A sailor might recommend, “If you often anchor in sandy or muddy areas, a Danforth anchor is a good choice for its holding power.”

41. Plow

This term refers to the action of dropping an anchor to secure a ship or boat in place. It is often used when discussing the process of anchoring a vessel.

  • For example, a sailor might say, “We need to plow the anchor here to stop the boat from drifting.”
  • In a boating guide, the author might explain, “To safely anchor, you must know how to plow the anchor.”
  • A captain giving instructions might say, “Plow the anchor gently to avoid damaging the seabed.”

42. Admiralty pattern

The term “Admiralty pattern” refers to a specific design of anchor that is commonly used on ships and boats. It is characterized by its shape and features, which make it effective in holding a vessel in place.

  • For instance, a sailor might say, “We use the Admiralty pattern anchor on our ship because it provides good holding power.”
  • In a maritime history book, the author might mention, “The Admiralty pattern anchor was widely adopted by naval fleets in the 19th century.”
  • A boat owner might ask, “Do you think the Admiralty pattern anchor would be suitable for my sailboat?”

43. Fisherman

The term “fisherman” is sometimes used as a nickname for an anchor, particularly in the fishing industry. It is a playful term that adds a touch of personality to the object.

  • For example, a fisherman might say, “Let’s lower the fisherman and start fishing.”
  • In a fishing magazine, the author might write, “Choosing the right fisherman is crucial for a successful fishing trip.”
  • A boat captain might say, “Make sure the fisherman is securely fastened before we set sail.”

44. Mushroom

The term “mushroom” is used to describe a specific type of anchor that has a rounded, mushroom-like shape. This design allows the anchor to dig into the seabed and provide secure holding power.

  • For instance, a sailor might say, “We use a mushroom anchor when we need strong holding power in muddy or sandy bottoms.”
  • In a boating manual, the author might explain, “The mushroom anchor is ideal for anchoring in soft or loose seabeds.”
  • A boat owner might ask, “Do you think a mushroom anchor would be suitable for my small sailboat?”

The term “navy” is sometimes used as a slang term for an anchor, particularly among sailors and maritime enthusiasts. It is a casual and familiar way to refer to the object.

  • For example, a sailor might say, “Make sure you secure the navy properly before we leave the dock.”
  • In a naval history book, the author might write, “The navy has always been an essential tool for maritime exploration and warfare.”
  • A boat captain might say, “I need someone to help me lift the navy and stow it away.”

46. Deadweight

Deadweight is a slang term used to describe someone or something that is considered useless or burdensome. It is often used to refer to a person who contributes nothing or drags others down.

  • For example, “That lazy coworker is such a deadweight. They never do any work.”
  • In a group project, someone might say, “We need to get rid of the deadweight if we want to succeed.”
  • A person discussing a failing business might comment, “The outdated technology is a deadweight holding us back.”

47. Fluke anchor

A fluke anchor is a specific type of anchor that has a flat, pointed bottom. It is designed to dig into the seabed or riverbed in order to secure a vessel in place.

  • For instance, “We used a fluke anchor to anchor the boat securely in the shallow water.”
  • A sailor might say, “Make sure to deploy the fluke anchor before leaving the boat.”
  • In a conversation about different types of anchors, someone might mention, “The fluke anchor is popular for small boats and recreational use.”

48. Grapnel anchor

A grapnel anchor is a small anchor that typically has multiple hooks or flukes. It is designed to catch onto underwater obstacles or structures to secure a vessel.

  • For example, “We used a grapnel anchor to anchor the boat to the dock.”
  • A fisherman might say, “I always carry a grapnel anchor in case I need to secure my boat while fishing.”
  • In a discussion about different types of anchors, someone might mention, “The grapnel anchor is versatile and useful in various anchoring situations.”

49. Kedge anchor

A kedge anchor is a secondary anchor that is used for stability or maneuvering purposes. It is typically smaller and lighter than the primary anchor and is used in addition to it.

  • For instance, “We used a kedge anchor to keep the boat steady while fishing.”
  • A sailor might say, “Drop the kedge anchor to help us turn and maneuver the boat.”
  • In a conversation about anchoring techniques, someone might mention, “Using a kedge anchor can provide extra stability in strong currents or winds.”

50. Plow anchor

A plow anchor is a type of anchor that has a pointed, plow-like design. It is commonly used on larger boats and is known for its ability to dig into the seabed and provide strong holding power.

  • For example, “We used a plow anchor to anchor the yacht in the deep water.”
  • A boater might say, “The plow anchor is reliable and effective in various bottom conditions.”
  • In a discussion about different types of anchors, someone might mention, “The plow anchor is a popular choice for larger vessels due to its holding power.”

51. Admiralty pattern anchor

This term refers to a specific design of anchor that is commonly used in maritime applications. The Admiralty pattern anchor features a stock, flukes, and a shank, and is known for its efficiency and holding power.

  • For example, a sailor might say, “We need to drop the Admiralty anchor to secure the ship.”
  • In a discussion about different types of anchors, someone might ask, “What are the advantages of using an Admiralty pattern anchor?”
  • A maritime historian might mention, “The Admiralty anchor was first introduced in the 19th century and quickly became the standard for naval vessels.”

52. Fisherman anchor

The term “Fisherman anchor” is slang for a specific type of anchor that is commonly used by fishermen. This type of anchor is designed to hold a boat in place in various weather conditions and is known for its stability and reliability.

  • For instance, a fisherman might say, “I always use a Fisherman anchor when I’m out at sea.”
  • In a conversation about boating equipment, someone might ask, “What’s the best type of anchor to use for fishing?” and another person might respond, “A Fisherman anchor is a popular choice.”
  • A fishing enthusiast might comment, “I’ve tried different anchors, but I always go back to the Fisherman anchor because it never fails me.”

53. Mushroom anchor

The term “Mushroom anchor” refers to a type of anchor that has a round, flat shape resembling a mushroom cap. This design allows the anchor to create suction and hold onto the seabed, providing stability for boats and other watercraft.

  • For example, a sailor might say, “We’re using a Mushroom anchor to keep the boat steady.”
  • In a discussion about different anchor designs, someone might ask, “What are the advantages of using a Mushroom anchor?”
  • A boating enthusiast might mention, “I prefer using a Mushroom anchor in shallow waters because it provides excellent holding power.”

The term “Navy anchor” is slang for the type of anchor commonly used by naval vessels. Navy anchors are designed to be strong and reliable, capable of securing large ships in various conditions.

  • For instance, a sailor might say, “We’re dropping the Navy anchor to secure the ship.”
  • In a conversation about naval equipment, someone might ask, “What type of anchor does the Navy use?” and another person might respond, “They typically use a Navy anchor.”
  • A naval historian might comment, “The Navy anchor has played a significant role in maritime history and is a symbol of naval power.”

55. Sea hook anchor

The term “Sea hook anchor” is slang for a type of anchor that has a hook-like design. This design allows the anchor to dig into the seabed and provide secure holding for boats and other watercraft in various weather conditions.

  • For example, a sailor might say, “We’re using a Sea hook anchor to keep the boat in place.”
  • In a discussion about different anchor types, someone might ask, “What are the advantages of using a Sea hook anchor?”
  • A boating enthusiast might mention, “I find that a Sea hook anchor works best in rocky or uneven seabeds.”

56. Stream anchor anchor

In the context of streaming, a “stream anchor” refers to the main host or presenter of a live stream. The term is used to describe the person who holds the stream together and guides the audience through the content.

  • For example, “The stream anchor introduced the special guest and led the discussion.”
  • In a gaming stream, the stream anchor might say, “Thanks for joining me today. Let’s dive into this new game together!”
  • A viewer might comment, “The stream anchor’s energy really keeps me engaged throughout the stream.”

57. Trot anchor

To “trot anchor” means to slow down or come to a stop. This slang term is often used in nautical or sailing contexts, where “anchor” refers to the device used to keep a ship or boat in place.

  • For instance, a captain might say, “Trot anchor, we need to assess the situation before proceeding.”
  • In a sailing race, a crew member might shout, “Trot anchor! We’re getting too close to the buoy.”
  • A sailor sharing their experience might mention, “We had to trot anchor to avoid colliding with another boat.”

58. Warps anchor

To “warps anchor” means to hold back or restrain someone or something. This slang term is derived from the nautical term “warp,” which refers to a rope used to move or hold a ship.

  • For example, a team leader might say, “We need to warps anchor on this project until we have more information.”
  • In a discussion about personal growth, someone might advise, “Don’t let fear warp your anchor. Take risks and embrace new opportunities.”
  • A motivational speaker might say, “It’s time to warp anchor and pursue your dreams without holding back.”

59. Cat anchor

A “cat anchor” refers to a lazy or unmotivated person. This slang term is a playful way to describe someone who lacks energy or initiative.

  • For instance, a friend might teasingly say, “You’re such a cat anchor. Get up and do something productive!”
  • In a conversation about work habits, someone might comment, “I can’t stand working with cat anchors who never contribute.”
  • A parent might playfully scold their child, saying, “Stop being a cat anchor and help with the chores.”

60. Deadweight anchor

A “deadweight anchor” refers to a person or thing that is a burden or hindrance. This slang term is often used to describe someone or something that holds others back or slows down progress.

  • For example, a team member who is not contributing might be referred to as a deadweight anchor.
  • In a discussion about relationships, someone might say, “It’s time to let go of deadweight anchors that don’t support your growth.”
  • A coach might advise their team, “Cut out the deadweight anchors and focus on those who are committed to success.”

61. Fluke anchor anchor

A fluke anchor is a type of lightweight anchor that is commonly used on small boats or for temporary anchoring. It is designed with pointed flukes that dig into the bottom of the water to provide stability.

  • For example, “I’m just going out for a quick swim, so I’ll use a fluke anchor to keep my boat in place.”
  • A sailor might say, “I always keep a fluke anchor on board for emergencies.”
  • When discussing different types of anchors, someone might mention, “A fluke anchor is great for sandy or muddy bottoms.”

62. Grapnel anchor anchor

A grapnel anchor is a small anchor that is designed with multiple hooks or flukes to catch onto structures or objects underwater. It is commonly used for temporary anchoring or in situations where a larger anchor is not needed.

  • For instance, “I’ll use a grapnel anchor to secure my kayak to a dock.”
  • A fisherman might say, “I always carry a grapnel anchor in case I want to anchor near a reef.”
  • When discussing different types of anchors, someone might mention, “A grapnel anchor is lightweight and easy to store on a small boat.”

63. Kedge anchor anchor

A kedge anchor is a secondary anchor that is used in addition to the main anchor to provide extra stability or to prevent the boat from drifting. It is typically smaller and lighter than the main anchor.

  • For example, “I’ll drop the kedge anchor off the stern to keep the boat from swinging.”
  • A sailor might say, “Having a kedge anchor on board is essential for anchoring in strong currents.”
  • When discussing anchoring techniques, someone might mention, “Using a kedge anchor can help you maintain a precise position in tight spaces.”

64. Plow anchor anchor

A plow anchor, also known as a CQR anchor, is a traditional anchor design that is commonly used on larger boats or in rough conditions. It is designed with a pointed tip and a curved shape that allows it to dig into the bottom and provide a strong hold.

  • For instance, “I’ll use a plow anchor when anchoring overnight in a crowded anchorage.”
  • A sailor might say, “A plow anchor is a reliable choice for holding a boat in strong winds.”
  • When discussing different types of anchors, someone might mention, “A plow anchor is known for its strong holding power in various bottom conditions.”

65. Admiralty pattern anchor anchor

An Admiralty pattern anchor is a heavy-duty anchor that is commonly used on large ships or in commercial applications. It is designed with a large, flat fluke and a stock that provides stability and strength.

  • For example, “The ship dropped the Admiralty pattern anchor to secure itself during the storm.”
  • A sailor might say, “An Admiralty pattern anchor is essential for anchoring large vessels.”
  • When discussing anchor sizes, someone might mention, “An Admiralty pattern anchor is one of the largest and heaviest anchors available.”

66. Fisherman anchor anchor

A fisherman anchor, also known as a weighted hook, is a type of anchor used by fishermen to secure their boats in place. It is designed to grip the bottom of the waterbed and prevent the boat from drifting.

  • For example, a fisherman might say, “I need to drop my fisherman anchor to keep the boat steady while we fish.”
  • Another might ask, “Do you have a fisherman anchor on board? We might need it if the current gets strong.”
  • In a fishing forum, someone might recommend, “Make sure you have a good fisherman anchor with enough weight to hold your boat in place.”

67. Mushroom anchor anchor

A mushroom anchor, also known as a disc-shaped anchor, is a type of anchor that is shaped like a mushroom. It is designed to sink into the sediment at the bottom of the water and provide a secure hold for boats or other floating objects.

  • For instance, a boater might say, “I prefer using a mushroom anchor because it provides a strong hold in muddy or sandy bottoms.”
  • Another might recommend, “If you’re anchoring in shallow waters, a mushroom anchor is a great choice.”
  • In a boating magazine, an article might discuss the benefits of a mushroom anchor for small boats.
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A navy anchor, also known as an admiralty anchor, is a type of anchor commonly used by naval vessels. It is known for its large size and heavy weight, which provide a strong hold in rough waters.

  • For example, a sailor might say, “The navy anchor is essential for keeping the ship stable during storms.”
  • Another might explain, “The navy anchor is designed to dig into the seabed and provide a secure hold even in strong currents.”
  • In a naval history book, the author might describe the importance of the navy anchor in maritime warfare.

69. Sea hook anchor anchor

A sea hook anchor, also known as a claw anchor, is a type of anchor that has multiple sharp points resembling claws. It is designed to grip the seabed and provide a strong hold for boats or other marine structures.

  • For instance, a sailor might say, “I always carry a sea hook anchor as a backup in case my primary anchor fails.”
  • Another might recommend, “If you’re anchoring in rocky or coral-filled areas, a sea hook anchor is a great choice.”
  • In a boating forum, someone might ask for advice on how to properly set a sea hook anchor for maximum holding power.

70. Stream anchor anchor anchor

A stream anchor, also known as a drift anchor, is a type of anchor used to slow down the drift of a boat in moving water. It is designed to create drag and increase resistance, allowing the boat to maintain a steady position.

  • For example, a kayaker might say, “I use a stream anchor when I want to fish in a specific spot without being carried away by the current.”
  • Another might explain, “A stream anchor is especially useful when fishing in rivers or streams with strong currents.”
  • In a boating magazine, an article might discuss the benefits of a stream anchor for drift fishing.
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71. Bitt

A bitt is a strong post or pair of posts on a ship’s deck, used for attaching mooring lines. It is used to secure the ship to a dock or to other stationary objects.

  • For example, a sailor might say, “Make sure to tie the mooring line to the bitt to secure the ship.”
  • In a discussion about maritime safety, someone might mention, “Always double-check the condition of the bitt before mooring the ship.”
  • A captain might give the order, “Prepare to drop the anchor and secure it to the bitt.”

72. Warping anchor

A warping anchor, also known as a kedge anchor, is a smaller anchor used for maneuvering a ship or boat. It is typically lighter and easier to handle than the main anchor and is used to change the direction or position of the vessel.

  • For instance, a sailor might say, “Let’s use the warping anchor to move the ship closer to the dock.”
  • In a discussion about anchoring techniques, someone might explain, “A warping anchor is useful for making small adjustments to the ship’s position.”
  • A captain might give the order, “Deploy the warping anchor to assist with docking.”

73. Moby

In the context of anchor slang, “Moby” refers to a large or oversized anchor. The term is often used humorously or informally to describe an anchor that is unusually large or heavy.

  • For example, a sailor might say, “We dropped the Moby anchor to make sure the ship stays in place.”
  • In a lighthearted conversation about anchors, someone might joke, “I heard they have a Moby anchor that can stop a whale.”
  • A crew member might comment, “That’s one massive Moby anchor they have on that ship.”

74. Berth

In the context of anchor slang, “berth” refers to a designated space or area where a ship can dock or moor. It is a specific location for a ship to anchor and secure itself.

  • For instance, a sailor might say, “We have been assigned a berth at the port.”
  • In a discussion about maritime logistics, someone might explain, “Each ship is allocated a specific berth based on its size and schedule.”
  • A captain might give the order, “Prepare to approach the assigned berth for docking.”

75. Port

In the context of anchor slang, “port” refers to a location where ships can dock or moor. It is a harbor or a designated area where vessels can anchor and load or unload cargo or passengers.

  • For example, a sailor might say, “We’re heading to the port to restock supplies.”
  • In a discussion about maritime trade, someone might mention, “The port is a crucial hub for importing and exporting goods.”
  • A crew member might comment, “The port is always bustling with activity, with ships coming and going.”

76. Starboard

Starboard refers to the right side of a ship when facing forward. It is the opposite of port, which is the left side.

  • For example, a captain might say, “Hard to starboard!” to give the command to turn the ship to the right.
  • When giving directions on a ship, someone might say, “Go down the stairs and turn right at the starboard side.”
  • In a naval battle, a sailor might shout, “They’re attacking from starboard!”

77. Stern

Stern refers to the back or rear of a ship. It is the opposite of bow, which is the front.

  • For instance, a captain might say, “All hands on deck at the stern!” to gather the crew at the back of the ship.
  • When describing the layout of a ship, someone might say, “The captain’s quarters are located at the stern.”
  • In a pirate movie, a character might say, “Walk the plank! Off the stern!”

78. Bow

Bow refers to the front or forward part of a ship. It is the opposite of stern, which is the back.

  • For example, a captain might say, “Keep a lookout at the bow!” to assign someone to watch for obstacles ahead.
  • When describing the design of a ship, someone might say, “The bow is pointed to cut through the water.”
  • In a naval battle, a sailor might shout, “Fire the cannons from the bow!”

79. Shipmate

Shipmate refers to a person who is part of the same crew on a ship. It is a term used to refer to fellow sailors or seafarers.

  • For instance, a sailor might say, “I trust my shipmates with my life.”
  • When introducing someone on a ship, a captain might say, “This is my trusted shipmate, John.”
  • In a naval ceremony, a sailor might toast, “To our shipmates, past and present!”

80. Seafarer

Seafarer refers to a person who travels by sea, whether as a sailor, captain, or passenger. It is a general term for someone who spends a significant amount of time on the water.

  • For example, a seafarer might say, “I feel most at home on the open ocean.”
  • When describing a career, someone might say, “Being a seafarer requires a strong sense of adventure.”
  • In a maritime museum, a plaque might honor the seafarers who have explored the world’s oceans.
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81. Mariner

A mariner is a person who navigates or works on a ship or boat. The term is often used to refer to someone who is experienced in sailing or has spent a significant amount of time at sea.

  • For example, “The mariner skillfully guided the ship through rough waters.”
  • In a discussion about maritime careers, someone might say, “Becoming a mariner requires extensive training and knowledge of navigation.”
  • A sailor might refer to themselves as a mariner, saying, “I’ve been a mariner for over 10 years now.”

82. Sailor

A sailor is a person who works on a ship or boat, typically in a non-officer position. Sailors are responsible for various tasks related to operating and maintaining the vessel.

  • For instance, “The sailor climbed the mast to adjust the sails.”
  • In a conversation about naval history, someone might mention, “Sailors played a crucial role in exploring new lands.”
  • A sailor might refer to their fellow crew members as sailors, saying, “We’re a tight-knit group of sailors on this ship.”

83. Swab

A swab is a slang term for a sailor or deckhand, particularly one who is responsible for cleaning and maintaining the ship’s deck. The term “swab” originated from the practice of using a swab (a large mop) to clean the deck.

  • For example, “The swab diligently scrubbed the deck to keep it clean and safe.”
  • In a discussion about ship maintenance, someone might say, “The swabs work hard to keep the ship looking pristine.”
  • A sailor might use the term swab to refer to themselves, saying, “I started off as a swab and worked my way up to a higher rank.”

84. Deckhand

A deckhand is a member of the ship’s crew who assists with various tasks related to operating and maintaining the vessel. Deckhands work on the deck and are responsible for tasks such as handling ropes, loading and unloading cargo, and assisting with navigation.

  • For instance, “The deckhand secured the ship to the dock using thick ropes.”
  • In a conversation about life at sea, someone might mention, “Deckhands often have physically demanding jobs.”
  • A deckhand might introduce themselves as such, saying, “I’m a deckhand on this ship, responsible for keeping things running smoothly.”

85. Boatswain

A boatswain, often referred to as a bosun, is a deck officer on a ship who is responsible for the maintenance of the vessel and overseeing the deck crew. The boatswain is in charge of tasks such as rigging, anchoring, and supervising the handling of cargo.

  • For example, “The boatswain gave orders to the crew, ensuring that everything was done efficiently.”
  • In a discussion about ship hierarchy, someone might mention, “The boatswain is an important position in the chain of command.”
  • A boatswain might refer to themselves as a bosun, saying, “I’ve been working as a bosun for several years now.”

86. Coxswain

A coxswain is the person in charge of steering and navigating a boat. They are responsible for giving commands to the rowers and ensuring the boat moves in the desired direction.

  • For example, during a rowing race, the coxswain might say, “Ready, row!” to start the rowers.
  • In a rowing team, someone might ask, “Who’s going to be the coxswain for our next race?”
  • A coxswain might give instructions like, “Turn starboard and increase the stroke rate!”

87. Helmsman

A helmsman is a person who steers a ship or boat. They are responsible for controlling the direction of the vessel by manipulating the steering mechanism.

  • For instance, during a sailing trip, the helmsman might say, “I’m going to adjust the course to avoid that reef.”
  • In a discussion about sailing, someone might ask, “What qualities make a good helmsman?”
  • A helmsman might say, “Keep an eye on the wind direction and adjust the rudder accordingly.”

88. Lookout

A lookout is a person assigned to keep watch and maintain a lookout for any potential hazards or dangers. They are responsible for scanning the surroundings and alerting others to any threats.

  • For example, during a maritime expedition, the lookout might say, “I see land ahead!”
  • In a discussion about safety at sea, someone might ask, “How often should the lookout rotate?”
  • A lookout might warn, “Keep an eye out for floating debris in the water.”

A navigator is a person who plans and directs the course of a ship or aircraft. They are responsible for determining the vessel’s position, plotting the route, and guiding the crew.

  • For instance, during a sailing trip, the navigator might say, “We need to adjust our heading to reach our destination.”
  • In a discussion about exploration, someone might ask, “What tools do navigators use to navigate?”
  • A navigator might provide guidance like, “Follow the stars to find your way at night.”

90. Captain

The captain is the person in overall command and control of a ship or boat. They are responsible for making decisions, ensuring the safety of the crew and passengers, and overseeing the operation of the vessel.

  • For example, during a boating excursion, the captain might say, “Prepare to dock at the marina.”
  • In a discussion about leadership at sea, someone might ask, “What qualities make a good captain?”
  • A captain might give orders like, “Lower the anchor and secure the sails.”

91. Skipper

The term “skipper” is often used to refer to the captain or leader of a ship. It is a colloquial term that is commonly used in sailing and boating communities.

  • For example, a sailor might say, “The skipper is responsible for navigating the ship.”
  • In a discussion about sailing, someone might ask, “Who is the skipper of this yacht?”
  • A person talking about their sailing experience might say, “I served as the skipper during our last voyage.”

92. First mate

The term “first mate” is used to refer to the second-in-command on a ship, also known as the first officer. They assist the captain in navigating and managing the vessel.

  • For instance, in a sailing crew, the first mate might be responsible for overseeing the deck operations.
  • In a discussion about a ship’s hierarchy, someone might ask, “Who is the first mate on this vessel?”
  • A sailor talking about their role might say, “I started as a deckhand and worked my way up to first mate.”

93. Second mate

The term “second mate” is used to refer to the third-in-command on a ship, also known as the second officer. They assist the captain and first mate in various duties, including navigation and safety.

  • For example, in a discussion about the crew structure, someone might ask, “Who is the second mate on this ship?”
  • A sailor talking about their career progression might say, “After serving as an able seaman, I became a second mate.”
  • In a conversation about responsibilities on a ship, someone might explain, “The second mate is usually in charge of maintaining charts and navigational equipment.”

94. Third mate

The term “third mate” is used to refer to the fourth-in-command on a ship, also known as the third officer. They assist the captain, first mate, and second mate in various duties, including navigation and safety.

  • For instance, in a discussion about the crew hierarchy, someone might ask, “Who is the third mate on this vessel?”
  • A sailor talking about their role might say, “I started as a cadet and worked my way up to third mate.”
  • In a conversation about watchkeeping duties, someone might explain, “The third mate is usually responsible for maintaining the ship’s log and overseeing the night watch.”

95. Able seaman

The term “able seaman” is used to refer to a skilled sailor who is capable of performing a variety of tasks on a ship. They are often responsible for general deck duties and assisting with navigation.

  • For example, in a sailing crew, an able seaman might be responsible for handling ropes and mooring the vessel.
  • In a discussion about qualifications, someone might ask, “Are you certified as an able seaman?”
  • A sailor talking about their experience might say, “I started as a deckhand and eventually became an able seaman.”

96. Boatswain’s mate

A boatswain’s mate is a non-commissioned officer in the navy who assists the boatswain. They are responsible for maintaining the ship’s equipment and supervising the deck crew.

  • For example, “The boatswain’s mate ordered the crew to hoist the sails.”
  • In a naval conversation, someone might ask, “Where can I find the boatswain’s mate?”
  • Another might say, “The boatswain’s mate is in charge of painting the ship’s hull.”

97. Quartermaster

A quartermaster is a military rank responsible for navigation, steering, and maintaining equipment related to navigation on a ship. They are in charge of charts, maps, and navigational instruments.

  • For instance, “The quartermaster plotted the ship’s course on the chart.”
  • In a naval conversation, someone might ask, “Is the quartermaster on duty?”
  • Another might say, “The quartermaster is responsible for keeping the ship on course.”

98. Steward

A steward is a sailor responsible for serving meals and maintaining cleanliness in the mess area of a ship. They assist with food preparation and cleaning duties.

  • For example, “The steward served breakfast to the crew.”
  • In a naval conversation, someone might ask, “Where is the steward?”
  • Another might say, “The steward keeps the mess area tidy and organized.”

99. Galley

A galley is the kitchen area on a ship where meals are prepared and cooked for the crew. It is also used to refer to the dining area where the crew eats their meals.

  • For instance, “The cook works in the galley to prepare meals.”
  • In a naval conversation, someone might ask, “Is dinner ready in the galley?”
  • Another might say, “The galley is where the crew gathers to eat.”

100. Mess deck

A mess deck is the area on a ship where the crew eats their meals. It is often a large open space with tables and benches for seating.

  • For example, “The crew gathered on the mess deck for lunch.”
  • In a naval conversation, someone might ask, “Are there any available seats on the mess deck?”
  • Another might say, “The mess deck is where the crew socializes and relaxes during meal times.”

101. Forecastle

The forecastle, often abbreviated as fo’c’sle, is the forward part of a ship’s upper deck, typically used as crew quarters. It is also used to refer to the area beneath the deck where the crew’s living quarters are located.

  • For example, a sailor might say, “I’ll be sleeping in the forecastle tonight.”
  • In a discussion about ship design, someone might mention, “The forecastle is an important part of the ship’s structure.”
  • A maritime historian might explain, “The forecastle was traditionally where the ship’s least experienced crew members slept.”

102. Poop deck

The poop deck is the highest deck on the aft (rear) part of a ship. It is usually above the captain’s quarters and provides a high vantage point for observing the surrounding area.

  • For instance, a sailor might say, “I have the best view from the poop deck.”
  • In a historical context, someone might mention, “The poop deck was where the ship’s officers would gather to strategize.”
  • A naval enthusiast might explain, “The poop deck was often lavishly decorated to showcase the captain’s status.”

103. Gunwale

The gunwale, pronounced “gun’l,” is the upper edge of a boat’s side. It provides structural support and serves as a mounting point for various equipment, such as oarlocks or railings.

  • For example, a sailor might say, “Grab onto the gunwale to steady yourself.”
  • In a boating safety discussion, someone might mention, “Always keep your hands inside the gunwale to avoid accidents.”
  • A boat builder might explain, “The gunwale is an important component of the boat’s overall strength and stability.”

104. Hull

The hull refers to the main body or frame of a ship, excluding the masts, sails, and rigging. It is the watertight structure that provides buoyancy and support for the rest of the vessel.

  • For instance, a sailor might say, “The hull of this ship is made of steel.”
  • In a discussion about ship construction, someone might mention, “The hull is typically made of materials such as wood, fiberglass, or metal.”
  • A naval architect might explain, “The shape of the hull affects the ship’s stability, speed, and maneuverability.”

105. Keel

The keel is the central structural member of a ship that runs along the bottom from bow to stern. It provides stability and prevents the ship from being easily overturned by waves or wind.

  • For example, a sailor might say, “The keel helps keep the ship upright.”
  • In a discussion about ship design, someone might mention, “The keel is typically made of strong, heavy materials to provide stability.”
  • A naval engineer might explain, “The shape and size of the keel can affect the ship’s performance and handling in different water conditions.”