Top 44 Slang For And All – Meaning & Usage

In the fast-paced world of slang, new terms are constantly popping up to keep us on our toes. “Slang For And All” is no exception, and our team is here to break down the latest and trendiest phrases that are making waves. Get ready to level up your slang game and stay ahead of the curve with our curated list of buzzworthy expressions. Let’s dive in and explore the colorful world of modern language together!

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1. N’ all

This slang phrase is a contraction of “and all” and is used to add emphasis or inclusiveness to a statement. It is commonly used in casual conversation and informal writing.

  • For example, “We went to the store n’ all to get some snacks.”
  • In a discussion about weekend plans, someone might say, “Let’s go to the beach, n’ all.”
  • A person describing their favorite restaurant might say, “The food is delicious, the service is great, n’ all.”

2. An’ all

Similar to “n’ all,” this slang phrase is a contraction of “and all” and is used to add emphasis or inclusiveness to a statement. It is commonly used in casual conversation and informal writing.

  • For instance, “I bought some new clothes an’ all for the party.”
  • When discussing hobbies, someone might say, “I love playing video games, watching movies, an’ all.”
  • A person describing a vacation might say, “We went to the beach, relaxed, an’ all.”

This phrase is a colloquial way of saying “and everything else” or “and so on”. It is often used to add emphasis or to indicate that there are additional things included in a statement or situation.

  • For example, “I need to buy groceries – milk, eggs, bread, ‘n’ all.”
  • In a conversation about a party, someone might say, “There will be food, drinks, music, ‘n’ all.”
  • Another person might say, “I’ve been to that restaurant before. The food is great – burgers, fries, ‘n’ all.”

27. N all

Similar to “‘n’ all”, this phrase is a shortened form of “and all”. It is commonly used in casual speech to indicate that there are additional things or details that are included in a statement.

  • For instance, “I went to the store and got groceries – milk, eggs, bread, n’ all.”
  • In a conversation about a vacation, someone might say, “We went to the beach, relaxed, swam, n’ all.”
  • Another person might say, “The party was fun – music, dancing, laughing, n’ all.”

28. N all that

This phrase is a colloquial way of saying “and everything related” or “and similar things”. It is often used to indicate that there are additional things or details that are part of a larger category or group.

  • For example, “I love going to the park – playing frisbee, having picnics, n’ all that.”
  • In a discussion about hobbies, someone might say, “I enjoy outdoor activities – hiking, biking, camping, n’ all that.”
  • Another person might say, “I like watching movies – action, comedy, drama, n’ all that.”

29. N’ all that

Similar to “n all that”, this phrase is a shortened form of “and all that”. It is commonly used in casual speech to indicate that there are additional things or details that are part of a larger category or group.

  • For instance, “I like going to concerts – rock, pop, hip-hop, n’ all that.”
  • In a conversation about fashion, someone might say, “I love different styles – vintage, bohemian, modern, n’ all that.”
  • Another person might say, “I enjoy trying new foods – sushi, pizza, tacos, n’ all that.”

30. ‘n’ all that

This phrase is a colloquial way of saying “and everything related” or “and similar things”. It is often used to indicate that there are additional things or details that are part of a larger category or group.

  • For example, “I love going to the beach – swimming, sunbathing, building sandcastles, ‘n’ all that.”
  • In a discussion about hobbies, someone might say, “I enjoy outdoor activities – hiking, camping, fishing, ‘n’ all that.”
  • Another person might say, “I like trying new restaurants – Italian, Mexican, Asian, ‘n’ all that.”

31. And all that drivel

This phrase is used to dismiss something as meaningless or unimportant. It implies that the information or statement being referred to is trivial or lacks substance.

  • For example, “He was just spouting off about his theories and all that drivel.”
  • In a conversation about a boring lecture, someone might say, “The professor went on and on about ancient history and all that drivel.”
  • A person expressing frustration might exclaim, “I can’t believe I wasted my time listening to his speech and all that drivel!”

32. And all that tripe

This phrase is used to express disbelief or disagreement with something that has been said or presented. It suggests that the information being referred to is of poor quality or lacking credibility.

  • For instance, “He tried to convince us that aliens exist and all that tripe.”
  • In a discussion about a poorly written article, someone might comment, “The author just filled it with sensationalism and all that tripe.”
  • A person expressing skepticism might say, “I’m not buying into their conspiracy theories and all that tripe!”

33. And all that hokum

This phrase is used to dismiss something as nonsense or foolishness. It implies that the information or statement being referred to is without merit or credibility.

  • For example, “She was going on about her psychic abilities and all that hokum.”
  • In a conversation about a misleading advertisement, someone might say, “Don’t fall for their promises of instant weight loss and all that hokum.”
  • A person expressing frustration might exclaim, “I’m tired of listening to his excuses and all that hokum!”

34. And all that bunkum

This phrase is used to express disbelief or disagreement with something that has been said or presented. It suggests that the information being referred to is false or lacking in truth.

  • For instance, “He claimed to have invented a perpetual motion machine and all that bunkum.”
  • In a discussion about a questionable political statement, someone might comment, “The candidate’s speech was full of empty promises and all that bunkum.”
  • A person expressing skepticism might say, “I’m not buying into their conspiracy theories and all that bunkum!”

35. And all that humbug

This phrase is used to dismiss something as nonsense or deception. It implies that the information or statement being referred to is insincere or lacking in truth.

  • For example, “He was going on about the benefits of his new product and all that humbug.”
  • In a conversation about a misleading advertisement, someone might say, “Don’t be fooled by their claims of instant success and all that humbug.”
  • A person expressing frustration might exclaim, “I’m tired of listening to their excuses and all that humbug!”

36. And all that hot air

This phrase is used to describe someone who talks a lot but doesn’t provide any substance or meaningful information. It implies that the person is full of hot air and is not to be taken seriously.

  • For example, “He went on and on about his accomplishments, but it was all just hot air.”
  • Another usage might be, “Don’t listen to him, he’s just spouting hot air.”
  • In a discussion about politics, someone might say, “Politicians are known for their hot air and empty promises.”

37. And all that blather

This phrase refers to excessive and pointless talk. It implies that the person is speaking without making much sense or providing any valuable information.

  • For instance, “I couldn’t understand a word he was saying, it was all blather.”
  • In a conversation about a boring lecture, someone might comment, “The professor just went on and on with his blather.”
  • Another usage might be, “She’s always blathering about things that don’t matter.”

38. And all that blarney

This phrase is often used to describe smooth-talking or persuasive speech that is intended to deceive or flatter someone. It suggests that the person is using charm and flattery to manipulate others.

  • For example, “He tried to convince me with all that blarney, but I didn’t fall for it.”
  • In a discussion about sales tactics, someone might say, “They use a lot of blarney to sell their products.”
  • Another usage might be, “Don’t be fooled by her blarney, she’s just trying to get what she wants.”

39. And what have you

This phrase is used to indicate that there are other unspecified things or items related to the topic being discussed.

  • For instance, “She sells clothes, shoes, accessories, and what have you.”
  • In a conversation about hobbies, someone might say, “I enjoy painting, drawing, and what have you.”
  • Another usage might be, “He’s involved in politics, business, and what have you.”

40. And everything else

This phrase is used to refer to all the remaining or additional things that are related to the topic being discussed.

  • For example, “She packed her clothes, toiletries, and everything else she needed for the trip.”
  • In a discussion about a shopping list, someone might say, “I need to buy milk, eggs, bread, and everything else.”
  • Another usage might be, “He’s responsible for managing the budget, expenses, and everything else related to finances.”

41. And all that kind of thing

This phrase is used to refer to a variety of similar things or ideas without going into specific details. It is often used to summarize or generalize a larger concept.

  • For example, “I have to clean the house, do the laundry, and all that kind of thing.”
  • In a conversation about hobbies, someone might say, “I enjoy painting, drawing, and all that kind of thing.”
  • A person describing their job might say, “I handle paperwork, make phone calls, and all that kind of thing.”

42. And all that sort of thing

This phrase is similar in meaning to “and all that kind of thing” and is used to refer to a variety of similar things or ideas without going into specific details. It is often used to summarize or generalize a larger concept.

  • For instance, “I need to pick up groceries, run errands, and all that sort of thing.”
  • In a discussion about fashion, someone might say, “I like wearing dresses, skirts, and all that sort of thing.”
  • A person describing their interests might say, “I enjoy reading, writing, and all that sort of thing.”

43. And all that hoopla

This phrase is used to refer to a lot of excitement, commotion, or fuss surrounding something. It is often used to downplay or dismiss the significance of an event or situation.

  • For example, “I don’t understand all the wedding planning and all that hoopla.”
  • In a conversation about a party, someone might say, “There was music, dancing, and all that hoopla.”
  • A person describing a big celebration might say, “There were fireworks, food, and all that hoopla.”

44. And all that BS

This phrase is used to refer to something that is considered untrue, exaggerated, or unnecessary. It is often used to express frustration or disbelief.

  • For instance, “I don’t want to hear about his excuses, his lies, and all that BS.”
  • In a discussion about a rumor, someone might say, “It’s just gossip, drama, and all that BS.”
  • A person expressing their frustration might say, “I’m tired of dealing with the bureaucracy, the red tape, and all that BS.”
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