Top 53 Slang For Angry – Meaning & Usage

Feeling angry is a common emotion that we all experience from time to time. But sometimes, it can be hard to find the right words to express our frustration. That’s where we come in. In this listicle, we’ve gathered the top slang words for angry, so you can better articulate your feelings and maybe even have a laugh along the way. Get ready to discover some creative ways to describe that boiling rage within you!

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1. Pissed

This term is a slang synonym for being angry or upset. It is often used to describe a strong and intense feeling of anger.

  • For instance, “He was pissed when he found out his car had been towed.”
  • In a heated argument, someone might say, “I’m getting really pissed off at your constant interruptions.”
  • A frustrated person might exclaim, “I’m so pissed that I didn’t get the promotion I deserved!”

2. Furious

This word describes a state of extreme anger, often accompanied by intense rage and indignation. It implies a high level of emotional intensity and a loss of control.

  • For example, “She was absolutely furious when she discovered her partner had been lying to her.”
  • In a confrontation, someone might shout, “I’m furious that you would treat me this way!”
  • A person might describe their anger by saying, “I’m so furious I can’t even think straight!”

3. Up in arms

This phrase is used to describe being extremely angry or upset about a particular issue or situation. It implies a strong emotional response and a willingness to take action or express one’s displeasure.

  • For instance, “The community was up in arms over the proposed construction project.”
  • In a debate, someone might say, “I’m up in arms about the government’s handling of the situation.”
  • A person might express their anger by declaring, “I’m up in arms about the way they treated me!”

4. Seen red

This phrase means to become so angry that one’s vision seems to turn red, symbolizing a loss of control and an intense emotional state.

  • For example, “When he insulted her, she saw red and lashed out.”
  • In a moment of rage, someone might say, “I saw red and couldn’t stop myself from yelling.”
  • A person might describe their anger by stating, “I saw red and completely lost my temper.”

5. Blew a fuse

This phrase is used to describe losing one’s temper in a sudden and explosive manner. It implies a sudden and intense burst of anger, often resulting in an outburst or aggressive behavior.

  • For instance, “When he heard the news, he blew a fuse and started yelling.”
  • In a heated argument, someone might say, “She blew a fuse and stormed out of the room.”
  • A person might describe their anger by exclaiming, “I completely blew a fuse and said things I regret.”

6. A gasket

When someone “blows a gasket,” they are losing their temper or becoming extremely angry. This phrase is often used to describe someone who becomes visibly upset or explodes with anger.

  • For example, “He blew a gasket when he found out his car had been towed.”
  • Another usage might be, “She’s going to blow a gasket when she sees the mess in the kitchen.”
  • A person might say, “I nearly blew a gasket when I saw the price of that concert ticket.”

7. Salty

When someone is described as “salty,” it means they are bitter, resentful, or easily angered. This term is often used to describe someone who reacts strongly and negatively to a situation.

  • For instance, “He’s always so salty when he loses at video games.”
  • Another usage might be, “She got really salty when I beat her in the competition.”
  • A person might say, “I don’t know why he’s so salty about not getting the promotion.”

8. Left on read

When someone is “left on read,” it means their message or communication has been seen or read by the recipient, but they have chosen not to respond. This can cause feelings of anger or frustration in the person who was left on read.

  • For example, “I can’t believe he left me on read after I poured my heart out.”
  • Another usage might be, “She got so angry when she was left on read by her best friend.”
  • A person might say, “I hate being left on read. It makes me feel like my message wasn’t important.”

9. Aggro

When someone is described as “aggro,” it means they are displaying aggressive or confrontational behavior. This term is often used to describe someone who is easily provoked or quick to anger.

  • For instance, “He got really aggro when someone accidentally bumped into him.”
  • Another usage might be, “She’s always so aggro when she’s driving in traffic.”
  • A person might say, “I try to avoid confrontations with people who are known to be aggro.”

10. Butthurt

When someone is described as “butthurt,” it means they are overly sensitive or easily offended by something. This term is often used sarcastically to mock someone who is reacting strongly to a perceived slight or insult.

  • For example, “He got butthurt when I made a joke about his favorite sports team.”
  • Another usage might be, “She’s always so butthurt whenever someone disagrees with her.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t be so butthurt about a little criticism. Learn to take it with grace.”

11. Riled up

When someone is riled up, they are extremely agitated or irritated. It can also refer to being worked up or emotionally stirred.

  • For example, “He got riled up when his favorite team lost the game.”
  • A person might say, “I’m getting riled up just thinking about that rude comment.”
  • Another might exclaim, “Don’t get riled up over something so trivial!”

12. Dirty look

A dirty look is a facial expression that conveys anger, disapproval, or contempt. It’s often used to show displeasure without saying a word.

  • For instance, “She gave him a dirty look after he made a rude comment.”
  • In a tense situation, someone might say, “I could tell she was angry just by the dirty look she gave me.”
  • A person might warn, “Don’t give me a dirty look unless you want to start a fight!”

13. Hot and bothered

When someone is hot and bothered, they are irritated, annoyed, or flustered. It can also refer to feeling uncomfortable or agitated.

  • For example, “She was hot and bothered by the constant interruptions.”
  • In a crowded and stuffy room, someone might complain, “I’m feeling hot and bothered in here.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t bother me right now, I’m already hot and bothered!”

14. Peeved

Peeved is a slang term used to describe someone who is annoyed or irritated. It’s often used to express a mild form of anger.

  • For instance, “He was peeved when his order arrived late.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling a little peeved about the constant interruptions.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I’m getting peeved with all these delays!”

15. Pissed off

Pissed off is a strong slang term used to describe someone who is extremely angry or annoyed. It’s often used when someone is pushed to their limits.

  • For example, “She was pissed off when he broke her favorite vase.”
  • In a heated argument, someone might shout, “I’m really pissed off at you right now!”
  • A person might say, “I don’t know why he’s so pissed off all the time.”

16. Mad as hell

This phrase is used to describe someone who is very angry and furious. It emphasizes the intensity of the anger.

  • For example, “He was mad as hell when he found out he had been betrayed.”
  • A person might say, “I’m mad as hell at my boss for not giving me the promotion I deserved.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I’m mad as hell about the way they treated me at the customer service desk!”

17. Livid

When someone is livid, they are extremely angry or furious. It implies a state of intense anger.

  • For instance, “She was livid when she discovered her car had been towed.”
  • A person might say, “I’m livid that my roommate ate my leftovers without asking.”
  • Another might express, “I’m livid at the way they mishandled my complaint.”

18. Fuming

When someone is fuming, they are extremely angry or irritated. It suggests a simmering anger that is about to explode.

  • For example, “He was fuming after being stuck in traffic for two hours.”
  • A person might say, “I’m fuming that my co-worker took credit for my idea.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I’m fuming about the terrible service at this restaurant!”

19. Seething

To seethe means to be filled with intense anger or resentment. It implies a suppressed anger that is ready to burst.

  • For instance, “She was seething with anger after her partner lied to her.”
  • A person might say, “I’m seething with rage over the unfair treatment.”
  • Another might express, “I’m seething inside, but trying to keep calm on the surface.”

20. Steamed

When someone is steamed, they are very angry or annoyed. It suggests a high level of frustration or irritation.

  • For example, “He was steamed when his computer crashed and he lost all his work.”
  • A person might say, “I’m steamed that my flight got delayed for the third time.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I’m steamed at the way they mishandled my complaint!”

21. Raging

When someone is “raging,” they are experiencing intense anger or fury. This term is often used to describe someone who is visibly and uncontrollably angry.

  • For example, “He was raging after finding out his car had been stolen.”
  • In a heated argument, someone might say, “She was raging at him, shouting insults.”
  • A person describing their anger might say, “I was so raging when I found out I didn’t get the job.”

22. Irritated

Being “irritated” means feeling slightly annoyed or bothered by something. It is a less intense form of anger, often caused by small inconveniences or frustrations.

  • For instance, “I was irritated when my phone battery died right before an important call.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m so irritated with all these spam emails.”
  • A person describing their mood might say, “I’ve been feeling really irritated lately, everything seems to bother me.”

23. Outraged

Feeling “outraged” means being extremely angry or indignant about something. It is a strong reaction to a perceived injustice or wrongdoing.

  • For example, “She was outraged by the unfair treatment of her friend.”
  • In response to a controversial decision, someone might say, “I am absolutely outraged by this ruling.”
  • A person expressing their anger might say, “I’m outraged that they would treat their employees this way.”

24. Enraged

When someone is “enraged,” they are filled with intense anger or fury. It is a state of extreme anger, often accompanied by a loss of control or rationality.

  • For instance, “He was enraged when he discovered his partner had been cheating.”
  • In a fit of rage, someone might say, “I was so enraged, I couldn’t think straight.”
  • A person describing their anger might say, “I’ve never been so enraged in my life, I felt like I could explode.”

25. Incensed

Being “incensed” means being extremely angry or outraged about something. It often implies a sense of righteous anger or moral indignation.

  • For example, “She was incensed by the government’s lack of action on climate change.”
  • In response to a betrayal, someone might say, “I am absolutely incensed by their actions.”
  • A person expressing their anger might say, “I’m incensed that they would treat innocent people this way.”

26. Wrathful

This word describes a state of extreme anger or rage. It implies a deep-seated anger that is intense and often accompanied by a desire for revenge.

  • For example, “He was wrathful after discovering his partner’s betrayal.”
  • In a heated argument, one might say, “I could see the wrathful look in his eyes.”
  • A person might express their wrath by saying, “I am wrathful at the injustice of this situation.”

27. Upset

This word describes a feeling of being emotionally disturbed or agitated. It refers to a state of being unhappy or displeased, often due to a specific event or circumstance.

  • For instance, “She was upset by the news of her friend’s illness.”
  • A person might say, “I’m really upset about failing the exam.”
  • In a conversation about a disappointing outcome, one might express their upset by saying, “I’m so upset that we didn’t win.”

28. Vexed

This word describes a state of being irritated or bothered by something or someone. It implies a mild to moderate level of anger or frustration.

  • For example, “He was vexed by the constant interruptions.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling really vexed by the slow internet connection.”
  • In a discussion about a difficult situation, one might express their vexation by saying, “I’m so vexed by this never-ending problem.”

29. Aggravated

This word describes a state of being intensely irritated or provoked. It implies a strong and often prolonged anger that is caused by a specific action or event.

  • For instance, “He was aggravated by the constant noise from the construction site.”
  • A person might say, “I’m so aggravated by the slow customer service.”
  • In a conversation about a frustrating situation, one might express their aggravation by saying, “I’m absolutely aggravated with this never-ending traffic.”

30. Cross

This word describes a state of being mildly annoyed or displeased. It implies a temporary anger or frustration that is often caused by a specific incident or behavior.

  • For example, “She was cross with her friend for canceling their plans.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling quite cross about the constant interruptions.”
  • In a discussion about a minor inconvenience, one might express their crossness by saying, “I’m a bit cross that my favorite restaurant is closed.”

31. Irate

When someone is irate, they are extremely angry or furious. It is a strong expression of anger.

  • For example, “The customer was irate when he found out his order was wrong.”
  • A person might say, “I was irate when I found out my car had been towed.”
  • In a heated argument, someone might shout, “Irate or not, you can’t talk to me like that!”

32. Hopping mad

When someone is hopping mad, they are very angry or furious. The term conveys a sense of intense anger and frustration.

  • For instance, “He was hopping mad when he found out his team lost the game.”
  • A person might say, “I’m hopping mad that my flight got canceled.”
  • In a discussion about unfair treatment, someone might exclaim, “I’d be hopping mad if that happened to me!”

33. Hot under the collar

When someone is hot under the collar, they are provoked or angered. The phrase suggests that the person’s anger is rising and they are becoming visibly upset.

  • For example, “He was hot under the collar when his co-worker took credit for his idea.”
  • A person might say, “I get hot under the collar when people don’t follow the rules.”
  • In a heated argument, someone might warn, “You’re making me hot under the collar, so watch what you say!”

34. Fit to be tied

When someone is fit to be tied, they are extremely angry or enraged. The phrase implies that the person’s anger is so intense that they feel restrained or tied up.

  • For instance, “She was fit to be tied when she found out her partner cheated on her.”
  • A person might say, “I was fit to be tied when I got a parking ticket for no reason.”
  • In a discussion about frustrating situations, someone might share, “I was fit to be tied when my computer crashed right before a deadline!”

35. Seeing red

When someone is seeing red, they are becoming extremely angry or furious. The phrase suggests that the person’s anger is so intense that their vision may be affected.

  • For example, “She was seeing red when her friend betrayed her trust.”
  • A person might say, “I see red when people cut in line.”
  • In a heated argument, someone might declare, “You’re making me see red with your disrespectful comments!”

36. On the warpath

This phrase is used to describe someone who is extremely angry and ready to confront or attack someone or something.

  • For example, “Watch out, she’s on the warpath after finding out about the betrayal.”
  • In a heated argument, someone might say, “I’m on the warpath now, you better watch your back.”
  • A boss who is angry at their employees might say, “If you don’t meet the deadline, I’ll be on the warpath.”

37. Pissed as a newt

This phrase is a humorous way to describe someone who is very angry. It uses the image of a newt, a small amphibian, to emphasize the intensity of the anger.

  • For instance, “He was pissed as a newt when he found out about the prank.”
  • A person might say, “I’m pissed as a newt after being treated unfairly.”
  • In a frustrating situation, someone might exclaim, “I’m pissed as a newt, this is ridiculous!”

38. Wound up

This phrase is used to describe someone who is agitated, irritated, or worked up about something. It implies a state of tension or nervousness.

  • For example, “She’s really wound up about the upcoming exam.”
  • After a long day of dealing with problems, someone might say, “I’m so wound up, I need to relax.”
  • In a stressful situation, a person might say, “I’m getting wound up, I need some time alone.”

39. Fired up

This phrase is used to describe someone who is very angry or enraged about something. It implies a high level of intensity and passion in the anger.

  • For instance, “He was fired up after hearing the news.”
  • In a heated argument, someone might say, “I’m fired up, you better back off.”
  • A person who is angry at an injustice might say, “I’m fired up and ready to fight for what’s right.”

40. Ticked off

This phrase is used to describe someone who is annoyed, irritated, or upset about something. It implies a feeling of being provoked or bothered.

  • For example, “She was really ticked off when her plans got canceled.”
  • After being repeatedly interrupted, someone might say, “I’m getting ticked off, can’t you see I’m busy?”
  • In a frustrating situation, a person might exclaim, “I’m ticked off, this is ridiculous!”

41. Bristling

This term refers to someone who is extremely angry or annoyed, often to the point of showing visible signs of agitation.

  • For example, “He was bristling with anger as he confronted his boss about the unfair treatment.”
  • A person might say, “I could see him bristling with rage as he listened to the insulting remarks.”
  • Another example could be, “Her bristling response made it clear that she was not happy with the criticism.”

42. Rankled

When someone is rankled, they are deeply annoyed or bothered by something or someone.

  • For instance, “His constant criticism rankled her and made it difficult to work together.”
  • A person might say, “It really rankled me when he interrupted me while I was speaking.”
  • Another example could be, “The unfair treatment rankled him and fueled his determination to seek justice.”

43. Thundering

This term is used to describe someone who is extremely angry or furious.

  • For example, “He was thundering with anger as he confronted the person who had betrayed him.”
  • A person might say, “Her thundering voice could be heard throughout the room as she expressed her frustration.”
  • Another example could be, “His thundering footsteps indicated his rage as he stormed out of the room.”

44. Miffed

When someone is miffed, they are slightly annoyed or displeased about something.

  • For instance, “She was miffed when her friend canceled their plans at the last minute.”
  • A person might say, “I was a little miffed that he didn’t thank me for my help.”
  • Another example could be, “His miffed expression showed that he was not happy with the outcome of the situation.”

45. Grumpy

Grumpy refers to someone who is easily irritated or in a bad mood.

  • For example, “He’s always grumpy in the mornings before he has his coffee.”
  • A person might say, “I try to avoid him when he’s grumpy because he’s not very pleasant to be around.”
  • Another example could be, “Her grumpy attitude made it clear that she didn’t want to be bothered.”

46. Crabby

Crabby is a slang term used to describe someone who is easily irritated or in a bad mood. It is often used to describe someone who is grumpy or grouchy.

  • For example, “Don’t talk to him, he’s been crabby all day.”
  • You might hear someone say, “She’s always crabby in the mornings.”
  • A person might describe their own mood by saying, “I woke up feeling crabby today.”

47. Testy

Testy is a slang term used to describe someone who is easily annoyed or irritated. It is often used to describe someone who has a short temper or is quick to become angry.

  • For instance, “Be careful what you say to him, he’s been testy lately.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling testy today, so please don’t bother me.”
  • Someone might describe a situation by saying, “The meeting became very testy when they started arguing.”

48. Cantankerous

Cantankerous is a slang term used to describe someone who is difficult to deal with, often because of their bad temper or grumpy nature. It is often used to describe an elderly person who is easily annoyed or irritated.

  • For example, “He’s a cantankerous old man who doesn’t like anyone.”
  • A person might say, “I try to avoid her, she’s always so cantankerous.”
  • Someone might describe their own mood by saying, “I woke up feeling cantankerous today.”

49. Snappy

Snappy is a slang term used to describe someone who is easily irritated or quick to become angry. It is often used to describe someone who responds to situations with impatience or a sharp tone of voice.

  • For instance, “She’s been snappy with everyone today, I don’t know why.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling snappy right now, so please give me some space.”
  • Someone might describe a conversation by saying, “It got really snappy when they started arguing.”

50. Short-fused

Short-fused is a slang term used to describe someone who becomes angry or irritable very quickly. It is often used to describe someone who has a short temper or is easily provoked.

  • For example, “He’s short-fused, so be careful what you say.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling short-fused today, so please don’t push my buttons.”
  • Someone might describe a situation by saying, “It became very short-fused when they started yelling.”

51. Touchy

When someone is touchy, they are easily irritated or sensitive to certain topics or comments. It often implies a tendency to become angry or upset over small things.

  • For example, “Don’t mention politics around him, he’s really touchy about it.”
  • If someone reacts strongly to a harmless joke, you might say, “Wow, they’re really touchy today.”
  • A person who is touchy might snap at a friend for accidentally bumping into them and say, “Watch where you’re going!”

52. Mad as a hornet

When someone is mad as a hornet, they are extremely angry. The phrase compares their anger to the aggression and fury of a hornet, a type of stinging insect.

  • For instance, “She was mad as a hornet when she found out her car had been towed.”
  • If someone is yelling and throwing things in a fit of rage, you could say, “They’re as mad as a hornet right now.”
  • A person might describe their own anger by saying, “I was mad as a hornet when I discovered someone had eaten my leftovers.”

53. Infuriated

When someone is infuriated, they are extremely angry or enraged. It implies a level of anger that is intense and difficult to control.

  • For example, “He was infuriated when he found out his partner had lied to him.”
  • If someone is screaming and cursing in a fit of rage, you might say, “They’re absolutely infuriated.”
  • A person might write a strongly worded email to express their infuriation about a company’s poor customer service.
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