Top 32 Slang For Anxious – Meaning & Usage

Feeling anxious is a common experience for many people, but finding the right words to describe it can be a challenge. We’ve got you covered with a list of slang terms that perfectly capture the feeling of anxiety. From “nervous wreck” to “freaking out,” we’ve compiled a comprehensive guide to help you express your anxious emotions. So sit back, relax (or not), and get ready to explore the world of slang for anxious!

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This phrase is often used to describe a state of extreme excitement or infatuation. It can also be used to describe someone who is deeply in love with another person.

  • For example, “I’m head over heels for my new partner.”
  • A person might say, “I’m head over heels in love with this new book I’m reading.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I’m head over heels excited for the concert tonight!”

2. Fed up

This phrase is used to express a state of extreme frustration or annoyance with a situation or person.

  • For instance, “I’m fed up with my noisy neighbors.”
  • A person might say, “I’m fed up with all the traffic in this city.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I’m fed up with my job and need a change!”

3. Chilled out

This phrase is used to describe a state of relaxation or a person who is calm and easygoing.

  • For example, “I’m just chilling out at home tonight.”
  • A person might say, “I love going to the beach and chilling out.”
  • Another might comment, “I like to listen to music and chill out after a long day.”

4. Under the weather

This phrase is used to describe a state of feeling unwell or slightly sick.

  • For instance, “I’m feeling a bit under the weather today.”
  • A person might say, “I think I caught a cold and I’m under the weather.”
  • Another might comment, “I’m not feeling well, so I’ll be staying home and resting.”

5. Stressed out

This phrase is used to describe a state of feeling overwhelmed, anxious, or under a lot of stress.

  • For example, “I’m so stressed out about this upcoming deadline.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling really stressed out with all the responsibilities.”
  • Another might comment, “I need to find ways to relax and de-stress because I’ve been feeling so stressed out lately.”

6. Freaking out

This phrase is used to describe a state of extreme anxiety or panic. It implies feeling overwhelmed or out of control.

  • For example, “I’m freaking out about this upcoming exam.”
  • Someone might say, “She started freaking out when she realized she lost her wallet.”
  • In a stressful situation, a person might exclaim, “I can’t handle this, I’m freaking out!”

7. Tearing my hair out

This phrase is used to convey a sense of extreme frustration or stress. It implies feeling overwhelmed to the point of wanting to pull one’s hair out.

  • For instance, “I’ve been working on this project for hours and I’m tearing my hair out.”
  • Someone might say, “I felt like tearing my hair out when I couldn’t find my keys.”
  • In a difficult situation, a person might exclaim, “I’m so stressed, I could tear my hair out!”

8. At my wits’ end

This phrase is used to express a state of feeling completely helpless or at a loss. It implies that one has exhausted all possible solutions or strategies.

  • For example, “I’ve tried everything to fix this problem and I’m at my wits’ end.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m at my wits’ end trying to figure out how to pay off my debt.”
  • In a challenging situation, a person might exclaim, “I don’t know what else to do, I’m at my wits’ end!”

9. Going to pieces

This phrase is used to describe a state of extreme anxiety or emotional distress. It implies feeling overwhelmed to the point of losing control or falling apart.

  • For instance, “I’m going to pieces over this job interview.”
  • Someone might say, “She went to pieces when she received the bad news.”
  • In a high-pressure situation, a person might exclaim, “I can’t handle this, I’m going to pieces!”

10. Butterflies in the stomach

This phrase is used to describe the sensation of feeling nervous or anxious, often in the stomach area. It implies a fluttery or jittery feeling.

  • For example, “I always get butterflies in my stomach before a big presentation.”
  • Someone might say, “I had butterflies in my stomach before my first date.”
  • In an anticipation of a nerve-wracking event, a person might exclaim, “I’m so nervous, I have butterflies in my stomach!”

11. Like a cat on hot bricks

This phrase is used to describe someone who is extremely anxious or agitated. It implies a sense of restlessness and the inability to stay still.

  • For example, “I have a big presentation tomorrow and I’m feeling like a cat on hot bricks.”
  • When waiting for important news, someone might say, “I’ve been pacing back and forth like a cat on hot bricks.”
  • A person experiencing anxiety before a job interview might say, “I feel like a cat on hot bricks right now.”

12. Biting my nails

This phrase refers to the act of biting one’s nails as a result of nervousness or anxiety. It is a common physical habit that people engage in when feeling anxious.

  • For instance, “I’ve been biting my nails all day because I’m so anxious about the exam.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t stop biting my nails whenever I’m in a stressful situation.”
  • When discussing anxiety, someone might mention, “Biting my nails is a telltale sign that I’m feeling anxious.”

13. A bundle of nerves

This phrase is used to describe someone who is experiencing intense anxiety or nervousness. It suggests that the person’s emotions are tightly wound and difficult to control.

  • For example, “Before my job interview, I was a bundle of nerves.”
  • A person might say, “I always become a bundle of nerves before public speaking.”
  • When describing their anxiety, someone might say, “I feel like a bundle of nerves whenever I have to make an important decision.”

14. Heart racing

This phrase refers to the physical sensation of one’s heart beating rapidly or forcefully as a result of feeling anxious or scared. It is a common symptom of anxiety.

  • For instance, “Whenever I have to speak in front of a large crowd, my heart starts racing.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t control my heart racing whenever I’m in a stressful situation.”
  • When discussing their anxiety, someone might mention, “My heart races whenever I have to confront someone about a difficult issue.”

15. Anxious wreck

This phrase is used to describe someone who is in a state of extreme anxiety and feeling overwhelmed by their emotions. It suggests a sense of being unable to cope or function properly.

  • For example, “After the car accident, I was an anxious wreck.”
  • A person might say, “I become an anxious wreck whenever I have to make a decision.”
  • When describing their anxiety, someone might say, “I feel like an anxious wreck whenever I have to meet new people.”

16. Nervous wreck

When someone is described as a “nervous wreck,” it means they are feeling extremely anxious or stressed out. This term is often used to emphasize the severity of someone’s anxiety.

  • For example, “She was a nervous wreck before her big presentation.”
  • In a conversation about exam stress, someone might say, “I was a nervous wreck waiting for my results.”
  • A friend might express concern by saying, “You look like a nervous wreck. Is everything okay?”

17. Anxious as a cat in a room full of rocking chairs

This phrase is used to describe someone who is feeling extremely anxious or on edge. It conveys a sense of unease and restlessness.

  • For instance, “She’s as anxious as a cat in a room full of rocking chairs about the upcoming job interview.”
  • In a discussion about public speaking, someone might say, “I always feel anxious as a cat in a room full of rocking chairs before giving a presentation.”
  • A person experiencing social anxiety might relate by saying, “I often feel anxious as a cat in a room full of rocking chairs in crowded social situations.”

18. Jittery

When someone is described as “jittery,” it means they are feeling nervous or anxious, often with trembling or restlessness. This term is commonly used to describe the physical symptoms of anxiety.

  • For example, “She was feeling jittery before her first solo performance.”
  • In a conversation about caffeine intake, someone might say, “I’ve had too much coffee and now I feel jittery.”
  • A friend might notice someone’s nervous behavior and ask, “Why are you so jittery? Is something bothering you?”

19. On tenterhooks

When someone is “on tenterhooks,” it means they are feeling anxious or in a state of suspense. This term is often used to describe the anticipation of an important event or outcome.

  • For instance, “She was on tenterhooks waiting for the job offer.”
  • In a discussion about exam results, someone might say, “I’ve been on tenterhooks all week, waiting for my grades.”
  • A person awaiting important news might express their anxiety by saying, “I’m on tenterhooks waiting to hear back about the scholarship.”

20. Nervous as a long-tailed cat in a room full of rocking chairs

This phrase is used to describe someone who is feeling extremely nervous or anxious. It emphasizes the heightened state of anxiety and the constant need to be alert.

  • For example, “He’s as nervous as a long-tailed cat in a room full of rocking chairs before his driving test.”
  • In a conversation about public speaking, someone might say, “I always feel nervous as a long-tailed cat in a room full of rocking chairs before going on stage.”
  • A person with social anxiety might relate by saying, “I often feel nervous as a long-tailed cat in a room full of rocking chairs at parties.”

21. Fidgety

This term refers to someone who is unable to keep still or is constantly moving due to nervousness or anxiety.

  • For example, “He was fidgety during the job interview, constantly shifting in his seat.”
  • A person might say, “I always get fidgety before a big presentation.”
  • Another might comment, “She’s fidgety whenever she’s waiting for important news.”

22. Anxious as a long-tailed cat in a room full of rocking chairs

This phrase is used to describe someone who is extremely anxious or nervous in a particular situation.

  • For instance, “I was anxious as a long-tailed cat in a room full of rocking chairs before my first solo performance.”
  • A person might say, “I feel anxious as a long-tailed cat in a room full of rocking chairs whenever I have to speak in public.”
  • Another might comment, “He’s anxious as a long-tailed cat in a room full of rocking chairs whenever he has to make an important decision.”

23. Stressed to the max

This phrase is used to describe someone who is experiencing the highest level of stress possible.

  • For example, “I’ve been working long hours and I’m stressed to the max.”
  • A person might say, “I’m stressed to the max with all the deadlines I have to meet.”
  • Another might comment, “She’s stressed to the max because of the upcoming exams.”

24. Anxious as a turkey on Thanksgiving

This phrase is used to describe someone who is very anxious or nervous, often due to anticipation or excitement.

  • For instance, “She was anxious as a turkey on Thanksgiving before her wedding.”
  • A person might say, “I always get anxious as a turkey on Thanksgiving before a job interview.”
  • Another might comment, “He’s anxious as a turkey on Thanksgiving whenever he has to meet new people.”

25. Antsy

This term refers to someone who is feeling restless or impatient, often due to anxiety or excitement.

  • For example, “I’m feeling antsy waiting for the test results.”
  • A person might say, “I always get antsy before a long flight.”
  • Another might comment, “She’s been antsy all day, waiting for her job interview.”

26. Anxious as a cat in a room full of loud noises

This phrase describes someone who is feeling very anxious or nervous, comparing their level of anxiety to that of a cat in a room full of loud noises. It implies a heightened state of stress or unease.

  • For example, “I have a big presentation tomorrow and I’m anxious as a cat in a room full of loud noises.”
  • Another usage might be, “She’s always anxious as a cat in a room full of loud noises before flying.”
  • Someone might say, “I get anxious as a cat in a room full of loud noises whenever I have to speak in public.”

27. Anxious as a cat in a room full of closed doors

This phrase describes someone who is feeling extremely anxious or uneasy, comparing their level of anxiety to that of a cat in a room full of closed doors. It suggests a sense of being trapped or unable to escape a stressful situation.

  • For instance, “I’m anxious as a cat in a room full of closed doors waiting for the test results.”
  • Another usage might be, “He gets anxious as a cat in a room full of closed doors when he’s in crowded places.”
  • Someone might say, “She’s always anxious as a cat in a room full of closed doors before making important decisions.”

28. Anxious as a cat in a room full of mirrors

This phrase describes someone who is feeling extremely self-conscious or nervous, comparing their level of anxiety to that of a cat in a room full of mirrors. It implies a heightened awareness of one’s appearance or actions, leading to increased anxiety.

  • For example, “She’s anxious as a cat in a room full of mirrors whenever she has to give a presentation.”
  • Another usage might be, “He gets anxious as a cat in a room full of mirrors before going on a date.”
  • Someone might say, “I always feel anxious as a cat in a room full of mirrors when I have to speak in front of a large audience.”

29. Anxious as a cat in a room full of surprises

This phrase describes someone who is feeling extremely uncertain or apprehensive, comparing their level of anxiety to that of a cat in a room full of surprises. It suggests a heightened sense of anticipation or fear of the unknown.

  • For instance, “I’m anxious as a cat in a room full of surprises about what the future holds.”
  • Another usage might be, “He gets anxious as a cat in a room full of surprises before starting a new job.”
  • Someone might say, “She’s always anxious as a cat in a room full of surprises when she has to make important decisions.”

30. Anxious as a cat in a room full of unknowns

This phrase describes someone who is feeling extremely uneasy or worried about uncertain situations, comparing their level of anxiety to that of a cat in a room full of unknowns. It suggests a sense of discomfort or fear of the unfamiliar.

  • For example, “I’m anxious as a cat in a room full of unknowns about moving to a new city.”
  • Another usage might be, “He gets anxious as a cat in a room full of unknowns when he has to meet new people.”
  • Someone might say, “She’s always anxious as a cat in a room full of unknowns before traveling to a new place.”

31. Tense as a long-tailed cat in a room full of rocking chairs

This phrase describes someone who is feeling extremely nervous or anxious, as if they are in a situation where they need to be constantly alert and on edge.

  • For example, “I have a big presentation tomorrow and I’m as tense as a long-tailed cat in a room full of rocking chairs.”
  • A person might say, “I always get tense as a long-tailed cat in a room full of rocking chairs before a job interview.”
  • Another might say, “I can’t relax when I’m in a crowded place, I feel as tense as a long-tailed cat in a room full of rocking chairs.”

32. Frazzled

When someone is frazzled, they are feeling completely overwhelmed or worn out due to stress or anxiety.

  • For instance, “I’ve been studying for exams all week and I’m completely frazzled.”
  • A person might say, “I have so much on my plate right now, I feel constantly frazzled.”
  • Another might say, “I’ve been dealing with a lot of deadlines at work and I’m starting to feel frazzled.”
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