Top 38 Slang For Approved – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to staying up-to-date with the latest lingo, navigating through the world of slang can be a daunting task. But fear not! We’ve got you covered with a curated list of “Slang For Approved” that will have you speaking like a pro in no time. So buckle up and get ready to impress your friends with your newfound knowledge of the coolest and most current slang out there!

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1. Greenlit

When a project or idea is greenlit, it means that it has been approved to move forward. This term is commonly used in the entertainment industry to indicate that a movie, TV show, or other creative endeavor has been given the green light to proceed.

  • For example, “The studio greenlit the new superhero film after seeing the success of similar movies.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “Our proposal has been greenlit by the executives, so we can start working on it.”
  • A writer might share, “I just got the news that my book has been greenlit for publication!”

2. Thumbs up

This slang term is derived from the gesture of giving a thumbs-up sign, which traditionally signifies approval or agreement. In modern slang, “thumbs up” is used to indicate that something is approved or accepted.

  • For instance, someone might respond to a request by saying, “Thumbs up, you have my approval.”
  • In a conversation about a new idea, a person might say, “I’m giving this concept a thumbs up, I think it has potential.”
  • A social media post might include the caption, “Just got the job offer, thumbs up to new beginnings!”

3. A-OK

This term is used to indicate that something is in good order or has been approved. It is often used to convey that everything is going well or that a situation is under control.

  • For example, someone might say, “Don’t worry, everything is A-OK.”
  • In a business context, a manager might report, “The project is progressing A-OK, we’re on track to meet the deadline.”
  • A person might describe a successful event by saying, “The party went off without a hitch, it was A-OK!”

4. Rubber-stamped

When something is rubber-stamped, it means that it has been approved without much consideration or examination. This term suggests that the approval process was perfunctory and lacked thorough review.

  • For instance, someone might say, “The decision was rubber-stamped by the committee, there was no real discussion.”
  • In a conversation about bureaucracy, a person might comment, “Many government contracts are simply rubber-stamped without proper oversight.”
  • A journalist might criticize a political appointment by saying, “It seems like this nomination was rubber-stamped, with little regard for qualifications.”

5. Given the nod

When someone or something is given the nod, it means that they have received approval or recognition. This term can refer to both formal and informal approval, depending on the context.

  • For example, a coach might say, “After careful consideration, we’ve decided to give you the nod for team captain.”
  • In a conversation about promotions, someone might comment, “She’s been with the company for a long time, so she’s likely to get the nod.”
  • A person might describe a successful audition by saying, “I gave a great performance and got the nod from the casting director.”

6. Signed off

When something is “signed off,” it means that it has been officially approved or authorized by someone in a position of authority.

  • For example, a manager might say, “I’ve signed off on the project proposal.”
  • In a business setting, a coworker might ask, “Has the budget been signed off by the finance department?”
  • A supervisor might inform their team, “Once the report is signed off, we can move forward with the next phase of the project.”

7. Go-ahead

To give something the “go-ahead” means to give permission or approval for it to proceed.

  • For instance, a boss might say, “I’m giving you the go-ahead to start the new marketing campaign.”
  • In a meeting, someone might ask, “Did we get the go-ahead from the client to proceed with the changes?”
  • A team member might say, “We can’t start production until we have the go-ahead from management.”

8. Seal of approval

When something has the “seal of approval,” it means that it has been officially endorsed or approved by someone in a position of authority or expertise.

  • For example, a product might have a label that says, “With the seal of approval from top chefs.”
  • A movie critic might write, “This film definitely gets my seal of approval.”
  • A teacher might say, “Your project has the seal of approval, so you can move on to the next assignment.”

9. Tick of approval

To give something a “tick of approval” means to give it a positive acknowledgement or endorsement.

  • For instance, a parent might say, “I’ll give your idea a tick of approval and let you go to the party.”
  • In a group discussion, someone might say, “I think we should give this proposal a tick of approval and move forward.”
  • A supervisor might tell an employee, “Your work has received a tick of approval from upper management.”

10. Stamped and approved

When something is “stamped and approved,” it means that it has been officially accepted or endorsed.

  • For example, a document might have a stamp that says, “Received and approved.”
  • A government agency might issue a statement saying, “All applications stamped and approved.”
  • In a business setting, a manager might say, “Once the contract is stamped and approved, we can proceed with the project.”

11. Good to go

This phrase is used to indicate that something is approved or ready to be executed. It implies that all necessary preparations have been made and there are no obstacles or issues.

  • For example, a team leader might say, “We’ve completed all the tasks, so we’re good to go for the presentation.”
  • In a military context, a commander might give the order, “Get your gear and be good to go in five minutes.”
  • A pilot might receive clearance from air traffic control, “Flight 123, you’re good to go for departure.”

12. Given the green light

This phrase means that approval or permission has been given to proceed with a particular action or plan. It comes from the idea of traffic lights, where a green light indicates that it is safe to proceed.

  • For instance, a project manager might say, “We’ve been given the green light to start the new initiative.”
  • In a business context, a supervisor might tell an employee, “You have the green light to go ahead with the project.”
  • A coach might give a player the green light to take a shot, saying, “If you’re open, go for it. You have the green light.”

13. Get the thumbs up

This phrase means to get confirmation or approval for something. It originates from the gesture of showing a thumbs-up sign, which is commonly used to indicate agreement or acceptance.

  • For example, a team member might ask their boss, “Can I go ahead with this plan?” and receive the response, “You have the thumbs up.”
  • In a social setting, someone might propose a plan to their friends and ask, “Does everyone give the thumbs up to this idea?”
  • A teacher might ask their students, “Is everyone ready for the test? Thumbs up if you are.”

14. Clear for takeoff

This phrase is used in aviation to indicate that an aircraft has been given permission to take off and is ready to start its journey. It implies that all necessary checks and preparations have been completed.

  • For instance, an air traffic controller might say to a pilot, “Flight 123, you are clear for takeoff.”
  • In a metaphorical sense, someone might use this phrase to indicate readiness to start a new project or venture. They might say, “After months of planning, we’re finally clear for takeoff on our new business.”
  • A coach might use this phrase to motivate their team before a game, saying, “Get ready, everyone. We’re clear for takeoff. Let’s give it our all.”

15. All systems go

This phrase is used to indicate that all necessary preparations have been made and everything is ready to proceed. It originated from the field of aerospace engineering, where it means that all systems and components are functioning properly and ready for launch.

  • For example, a project manager might announce to their team, “The client has signed off on the project. All systems go.”
  • In a technological context, someone might say, “The software update has been tested and approved. All systems go for deployment.”
  • A teacher might use this phrase to indicate that a class is ready to start an activity, saying, “Everyone has their materials? Great, all systems go.”

16. Thumbs-upped

This term refers to giving a positive response or showing approval to something. It is often used in online platforms where users can give a “thumbs-up” or “like” to indicate their approval.

  • For example, “I thumbs-upped that post because I found it helpful.”
  • In a discussion about a new movie, someone might say, “I thumbs-upped the trailer because it looks really good.”
  • A user might comment, “I just thumbs-upped all the comments that made me laugh.”

17. Given the seal of approval

This phrase indicates that something has been officially approved or recommended by someone in authority. It implies that the person giving the approval has deemed it worthy or satisfactory.

  • For instance, “The CEO gave the project his seal of approval, so we can proceed.”
  • In a review of a restaurant, a critic might write, “The chef’s special dish was given the seal of approval by food critics.”
  • A parent might say, “I always ask my mom for her seal of approval before making any major decisions.”

18. Given the stamp of approval

Similar to “given the seal of approval,” this phrase indicates that something has been officially endorsed or accepted. It implies that the person giving the approval has deemed it satisfactory or worthy of recognition.

  • For example, “The committee gave the proposal their stamp of approval, so it can now move forward.”
  • In a business setting, a manager might say, “We need to ensure that all our products have been given the stamp of approval before they are launched.”
  • A teacher might give a student’s project the stamp of approval by saying, “Great job! This project is well-done and deserves recognition.”

19. Approved and endorsed

This phrase indicates that something has been formally accepted and supported by someone in authority. It implies that the person giving the approval has given their official endorsement to it.

  • For instance, “The new policy was approved and endorsed by the board of directors.”
  • In a political context, a candidate might say, “My campaign has been approved and endorsed by several influential leaders.”
  • A company might release a statement saying, “Our latest product has been approved and endorsed by industry experts.”

20. Cleared

This term indicates that something or someone has been given permission or approval to proceed. It implies that any obstacles or concerns have been addressed or resolved.

  • For example, “After a thorough investigation, the suspect was cleared of all charges.”
  • In a military context, a soldier might say, “We have cleared the area for safe passage.”
  • A doctor might tell a patient, “Your test results came back negative, so you’re cleared to resume normal activities.”

21. Vouched for

When someone vouches for something, they are giving their personal endorsement or recommendation. It implies that the person has personal knowledge or experience with the thing being vouched for.

  • For example, a friend might say, “I can vouch for this restaurant, the food is amazing.”
  • When discussing job applicants, a hiring manager might say, “I only hire candidates who are vouched for by someone I trust.”
  • A customer reviewing a product might write, “I can vouch for the durability of this phone, I dropped it multiple times and it still works perfectly.”

22. Endorsed

To endorse something is to publicly support or promote it. It often involves giving one’s approval or recommendation.

  • For instance, a celebrity might endorse a brand of clothing by appearing in their advertisements.
  • A politician might endorse a candidate by publicly stating their support.
  • A customer might write, “I highly endorse this product, it has exceeded my expectations.”

23. Blessed

To be blessed in the context of approval means to be favored or approved of by someone. It implies that the person granting the blessing sees the thing as positive or beneficial.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Your essay is truly blessed, it’s one of the best I’ve read.”
  • When discussing a job promotion, a manager might say, “He is truly blessed with exceptional skills and deserves the promotion.”
  • A customer reviewing a restaurant might write, “The food here is blessed, every dish is a delight to the taste buds.”

24. Ratified

Ratified means to formally approve or confirm something, often through a legal or official process. It implies that the thing being ratified has met certain criteria or requirements.

  • For instance, a treaty between countries may need to be ratified by the respective governments before it becomes legally binding.
  • When discussing a decision made by a committee, someone might say, “The proposal was ratified unanimously.”
  • A customer reviewing a product might write, “I’m glad to see that this company has ratified its commitment to sustainability.”

25. Sanctioned

When something is sanctioned, it means it has been officially approved or authorized by a governing body or authority. It implies that the thing being sanctioned has met certain standards or requirements.

  • For example, a sporting event may be sanctioned by a governing body to ensure fair play and adherence to rules.
  • A government may impose sanctions on another country as a form of punishment or to pressure them into changing their behavior.
  • A customer reviewing a business might write, “I appreciate that this company operates under sanctioned guidelines to ensure ethical practices.”

26. Green-lit

This term refers to a decision or project that has been given the go-ahead or approval. It often implies that the necessary steps or requirements have been met for something to proceed.

  • For example, “The new movie was green-lit by the studio and will begin production next month.”
  • In a business context, a manager might say, “We have green-lit the proposal and will move forward with implementation.”
  • A team leader might inform their colleagues, “Our project has been green-lit by upper management, so let’s get to work!”

27. Thumbs-up

This slang term is derived from the gesture of raising one’s thumb to indicate approval or agreement. It is often used to express support or endorsement for something.

  • For instance, “I gave the new restaurant a thumbs-up after trying their delicious food.”
  • In a discussion about a new product, a customer might comment, “I’ve been using it for a week and definitely give it a thumbs-up.”
  • A person might give a thumbs-up to a friend’s idea and say, “That’s a great plan! Thumbs-up from me!”

28. Signed off on

This phrase refers to the act of giving formal authorization or approval to a document, decision, or project. It implies that someone in a position of authority has reviewed and agreed to the matter at hand.

  • For example, “The manager signed off on the budget for the upcoming project.”
  • In a legal context, a lawyer might say, “I reviewed the contract and signed off on it, so it’s ready to be executed.”
  • A supervisor might inform their team, “I have signed off on your vacation requests. Enjoy your time off!”

29. Stamp of approval

This slang term implies that something has received official or authoritative approval. It often suggests a high level of endorsement or support for a particular person, idea, or product.

  • For instance, “The celebrity’s endorsement gave the brand a stamp of approval and boosted its sales.”
  • In a review of a book, a critic might say, “The author’s previous works have always received a stamp of approval from readers.”
  • A person might say, “I trust my friend’s taste in movies, so if she gives a film her stamp of approval, I know it’s worth watching.”

30. Sealed

This term implies that a decision, agreement, or deal has been concluded and is now considered official or binding. It often suggests that all necessary steps or requirements have been completed.

  • For example, “The contract has been signed and sealed, and the project can now begin.”
  • In a discussion about a business acquisition, someone might say, “The deal is sealed, and the two companies will merge.”
  • A person might inform their friends, “I’ve bought the tickets for the concert. Our plans are sealed!”

31. OK’d

This term refers to something that has been approved or given the go-ahead. It is often used in a casual or informal context.

  • For example, “The project was OK’d by the manager.”
  • A supervisor might say, “I OK’d your request for time off.”
  • In a conversation about a new policy, someone might ask, “Has it been OK’d by upper management?”

32. Green flag

This slang term is used to indicate that something has been approved or given the green light to proceed.

  • For instance, “The proposal was given the green flag by the committee.”
  • In a discussion about a new product launch, someone might say, “We’re waiting for the green flag from the marketing team.”
  • A project manager might inform the team, “Once we get the green flag, we can start working on the next phase.”

33. Given the thumbs up

This phrase signifies that something has been approved or given a positive evaluation.

  • For example, “The design was given the thumbs up by the client.”
  • In a conversation about a job application, someone might say, “I received the thumbs up from the hiring manager.”
  • A teacher might tell a student, “Your project was given the thumbs up. Great job!”

34. Given the go-ahead

This phrase indicates that something has been given permission or approval to proceed.

  • For instance, “The construction project was given the go-ahead by the city council.”
  • In a discussion about a new initiative, someone might say, “We’re waiting to be given the go-ahead from the CEO.”
  • A team leader might inform the members, “Once we’re given the go-ahead, we can start implementing the plan.”

35. Approved by the powers that be

This phrase suggests that something has been approved or authorized by those who hold power or authority.

  • For example, “The budget was approved by the powers that be.”
  • In a conversation about a policy change, someone might say, “We need to get it approved by the powers that be.”
  • A manager might inform the team, “The new software has been approved by the powers that be.”

36. Approved by the boss

This phrase refers to something that has been officially authorized or endorsed by a person in a position of authority, typically a supervisor or manager. It indicates that the decision or action has been given the boss’s approval and is considered acceptable or satisfactory.

  • For example, “The project was approved by the boss, so we can move forward with implementation.”
  • In a meeting, someone might say, “We need to get this proposal approved by the boss before we can proceed.”
  • A team member might ask, “Has the budget been approved by the boss yet?”

37. Given the all-clear

This slang phrase means that something has been given permission or clearance to proceed. It suggests that any obstacles or concerns have been addressed and resolved, and that it is now safe or acceptable to move forward.

  • For instance, “The construction site has been inspected and given the all-clear to begin work.”
  • In a conversation about a new product launch, someone might say, “Once we get the go-ahead from the marketing team, we’ll be given the all-clear to start promoting.”
  • A coach might tell their team, “Once you’ve completed your warm-up exercises, I’ll give you the all-clear to start the game.”

38. Given the thumbs-up

This phrase indicates that something has been given a positive signal or approval. It is often used to express agreement, acceptance, or endorsement of a decision, action, or idea.

  • For example, “The proposal was given the thumbs-up by the board of directors, so we can proceed with implementation.”
  • In a group discussion, someone might say, “I think we should give the thumbs-up to this new marketing strategy.”
  • A team leader might ask, “Can we get a thumbs-up from everyone before we finalize the project plan?”
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