Top 49 Slang For Arab – Meaning & Usage

Arab culture is rich and diverse, and so is its language. From casual conversations to online interactions, there are plenty of slang words and phrases that add flavor to the Arabic language. Whether you’re an Arabic speaker or simply interested in learning more about the culture, our team has put together a list of the top slang for Arab that will not only expand your vocabulary but also give you a deeper understanding of the region and its people. Get ready to embrace the vibrant world of Arab slang!

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1. Khalas

This word is commonly used in Arabic to indicate that something is finished or that someone has had enough. It can be used in various contexts.

  • For example, if someone is eating and they are full, they might say, “Khalas, I can’t eat anymore.”
  • In a conversation, if someone wants to end the discussion, they might say, “Khalas, let’s move on to another topic.”
  • When someone completes a task, they might say, “Khalas, I finished the project.”

2. Akeed

This word is used to express agreement or certainty. It is commonly used in informal conversations.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Are you coming to the party?”, one might respond, “Akeed, I’ll be there.”
  • In a discussion, if someone makes a statement and another person agrees, they might say, “Akeed, you’re right.”
  • If someone asks for confirmation, they might say, “Did you finish the report?” and the response could be, “Akeed, I completed it.”

3. Shaku maku

This phrase is a colloquial way of asking someone what’s happening or what’s new. It is commonly used in casual conversations.

  • For example, if two friends meet after a long time, one might say, “Hey, shaku maku?”
  • In a group chat, someone might start a conversation by asking, “Shaku maku, everyone?”
  • If someone wants to catch up with a friend, they might send a message saying, “Long time no see! Shaku maku?”

4. Walaw

This word is used to express that something is not a problem or to respond to a thank you. It is commonly used in Arabic-speaking countries.

  • For instance, if someone asks for a favor and the other person agrees, they might say, “Walaw, it’s not a problem.”
  • In a situation where someone thanks another person for their help, the response could be, “Walaw, happy to assist.”
  • If someone apologizes for a mistake, the reply might be, “Walaw, don’t worry about it.”

5. Ya haram

This phrase is used to express sympathy or disappointment. It is commonly used in situations where something unfortunate or disappointing happens.

  • For example, if someone spills a drink, another person might say, “Ya haram, what a mess!”
  • In a conversation about a missed opportunity, someone might say, “Ya haram, I wish I could have attended that event.”
  • If someone shares bad news, a response could be, “Ya haram, that’s really unfortunate.”

6. Yaani

This is a common Arabic slang phrase that is used to seek confirmation or agreement from the listener. It is similar to saying “you know?” or “do you get it?” in English.

  • For example, “I can’t believe she said that, yaani!”
  • A person might say, “He’s so annoying, yaani, always interrupting.”
  • In a conversation, someone might ask, “Yaani, are you coming to the party tonight?”

7. Inshallah

This is an Arabic slang term that translates to “God willing” in English. It is often used to express hope or uncertainty about a future event.

  • For instance, “I’ll see you tomorrow, inshallah.”
  • A person might say, “I’m hoping to get the job, inshallah.”
  • In a conversation about travel plans, someone might say, “We’ll have a great trip, inshallah.”

8. Hala wallah

This is a casual Arabic greeting that translates to “Hey, what’s up?” in English. It is commonly used among friends and acquaintances.

  • For example, “Hala wallah! Long time no see.”
  • A person might say, “Hala wallah, how’s it going?”
  • In a conversation, someone might greet their friend with, “Hala wallah, what’s new?”

9. Khali wali

This Arabic slang phrase translates to “Just leave it” or “Forget about it” in English. It is often used to dismiss or disregard a topic or situation.

  • For instance, “Don’t worry about it, khali wali.”
  • A person might say, “I don’t care about their opinion, khali wali.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “Let’s not argue about it, khali wali.”

10. Fahamit alyee shlon?

This Arabic slang phrase translates to “Do you understand how I feel?” in English. It is often used to express frustration or seek empathy from the listener.

  • For example, “He never listens to me, fahamit alyee shlon?”
  • A person might say, “I’m so tired of dealing with this, fahamit alyee shlon?”
  • In a conversation, someone might ask their friend, “I’m going through a tough time, fahamit alyee shlon?”

11. Min sijak?

A common greeting in Arabic, “Min sijak?” translates to “How are you?” It is often used in informal conversations among friends and acquaintances.

  • For example, when meeting a friend, one might say, “Min sijak? Long time no see!”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might ask, “Min sijak? Did you have a good weekend?”
  • When catching up with a colleague, one might say, “Min sijak? How’s work going?”

12. Habibi

“Habibi” is an Arabic term of endearment used to refer to a loved one, such as a friend, family member, or romantic partner. It conveys affection and closeness.

  • For instance, when greeting a close friend, one might say, “Hey habibi! How have you been?”
  • In a text message, someone might write, “Miss you, habibi. Can’t wait to see you soon!”
  • When expressing gratitude, one might say, “Thank you so much, habibi. You’re the best!”

13. Yalla

Derived from Arabic, “Yalla” is a versatile term that can be used in various contexts. It is often used to urge someone to take action or to move quickly.

  • For example, when encouraging friends to leave a party, one might say, “Come on, yalla! We don’t want to be late.”
  • In a sports game, a coach might shout, “Yalla, team! Show them what we’re made of!”
  • When motivating oneself to start a task, one might say, “Alright, yalla! Time to get to work.”

14. Mashallah

An Arabic phrase used to express praise, gratitude, or admiration. “Mashallah” is commonly used to acknowledge someone’s achievements or blessings and to ward off the evil eye.

  • For instance, when complimenting a friend’s new car, one might say, “Mashallah! It looks amazing.”
  • In a conversation about a successful business venture, someone might say, “Mashallah, their hard work paid off.”
  • When expressing appreciation for good health, one might say, “Mashallah, I feel blessed to be in good shape.”

15. Wallah

Derived from Arabic, “Wallah” is an expression used to emphasize the truthfulness or sincerity of a statement. It is often used in informal conversations or as a way to add emphasis.

  • For example, when assuring a friend of your honesty, you might say, “I didn’t break it, wallah!”
  • In a discussion about a memorable experience, someone might say, “It was the best vacation, wallah!”
  • When making a promise, one might say, “I’ll be there on time, wallah!”

16. Shwaya

This term is used to indicate a small quantity or degree of something.

  • For example, if someone asks for sugar in their coffee, they might say, “Just shwaya, please.”
  • In a conversation about spicy food, someone might say, “I can handle a little bit of heat, but not too much.”
  • When describing the amount of effort required for a task, someone might say, “It only takes shwaya of your time.”

17. Kifak

This phrase is commonly used to ask someone how they are doing or feeling.

  • For instance, when greeting a friend, one might say, “Hey, kifak?”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might ask, “Kifak today? Anything exciting happening?”
  • When checking in on a family member, someone might say, “Kifak, Auntie? Is everything going well?”

18. Yallah bye

This phrase is used to say goodbye or to indicate that it’s time to leave.

  • For example, when leaving a gathering, someone might say, “Yallah bye, everyone!”
  • In a phone conversation, someone might say, “I have to go now, yallah bye.”
  • When ending a video call, someone might wave and say, “Yallah bye! Take care!”

19. Astaghfirullah

This phrase is used as an expression of seeking forgiveness from Allah, often said after realizing a mistake or wrongdoing.

  • For instance, if someone accidentally says something offensive, they might say, “Astaghfirullah, I didn’t mean to offend you.”
  • In a conversation about personal growth, someone might reflect, “I’ve made a lot of mistakes in the past, but astaghfirullah, I’m working on becoming a better person.”
  • When discussing the importance of forgiveness, someone might say, “Astaghfirullah reminds us to seek forgiveness and strive for inner peace.”

20. Mabrook

This word is used to congratulate someone on an achievement or happy occasion.

  • For example, when a friend announces their engagement, one might say, “Mabrook! I’m so happy for you.”
  • In a conversation about academic success, someone might say, “I heard you got straight A’s. Mabrook!”
  • When celebrating a promotion, someone might raise a toast and say, “Mabrook on your well-deserved success!”

21. Sahtain

This is an Arabic phrase used to wish someone a good meal or to say “enjoy your meal.” It is commonly used before starting a meal or when someone is eating something delicious.

  • For example, if someone is serving food, they might say, “Sahtain, please help yourself.”
  • A person might comment on a tasty dish by saying, “Sahtain, this is delicious.”
  • When leaving a restaurant, one might say to the chef, “Sahtain, the food was amazing.”

22. Insha’Allah

This phrase is used to express the belief that something will happen only if God allows it or wills it. It is often used when talking about future plans or outcomes.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Will you be able to attend the event next week?” one might respond, “Insha’Allah, if everything goes as planned.”
  • A person might say, “I will submit my report tomorrow, Insha’Allah.”
  • When discussing travel plans, someone might say, “We hope to visit Egypt next year, Insha’Allah.”

23. Akhi

This term is used to address or refer to a male friend or acquaintance. It is commonly used among Arab speakers as a friendly and informal way to address someone.

  • For example, if two friends meet, one might say, “Hey, akhi, long time no see!”
  • When discussing a shared interest, someone might say, “Akhi, have you seen the latest episode of that TV show?”
  • In a group setting, someone might say, “Akhi, can you pass me the remote?”

24. Ukhti

This term is used to address or refer to a female friend or acquaintance. It is commonly used among Arab speakers as a friendly and informal way to address someone.

  • For instance, if two friends meet, one might say, “Hey, ukhti, how have you been?”
  • When discussing fashion or style, someone might say, “Ukhti, where did you get that beautiful dress?”
  • In a group setting, someone might say, “Ukhti, can you help me with this task?”

25. Shukran

This is the Arabic word for “thank you.” It is used to express gratitude or appreciation for something done or given.

  • For example, if someone holds the door open for you, you might say, “Shukran, I appreciate it.”
  • When receiving a gift, someone might say, “Shukran, this is very kind of you.”
  • In a formal setting, such as a business meeting, one might say, “Shukran for considering my proposal.”

26. Marhaba

Marhaba is an Arabic greeting that means “hello” or “welcome”. It is commonly used to greet someone when meeting them for the first time or when entering a place.

  • For example, when entering a shop, a person might say, “Marhaba, do you have this item in stock?”
  • When meeting a friend, one might say, “Marhaba, how have you been?”
  • A person might use Marhaba to greet a group of people, saying, “Marhaba, everyone! I hope you’re all doing well.”

27. Yalla habibi

Yalla habibi is an Arabic phrase that is used to encourage someone to hurry up or to join in an activity. It can be translated to “let’s go, my dear” in English.

  • For instance, when trying to get a friend to leave a place, one might say, “Yalla habibi, we’re going to be late!”
  • When inviting a friend to join in a game, a person might say, “Yalla habibi, come play with us!”
  • A person might use Yalla habibi to motivate their team, saying, “Yalla habibi, let’s give it our all and win this game!”

28. Mashy

Mashy is an Arabic term that is commonly used to mean “okay” or “let’s go”. It is often used to confirm agreement or to indicate willingness to proceed with a plan or task.

  • For example, when a friend suggests going to a restaurant, one might respond, “Mashy, let’s go!”
  • When someone asks if you’re ready to leave, a simple “Mashy” can indicate your readiness.
  • A person might use Mashy to confirm understanding, saying, “So, I need to bring my ID? Mashy, got it.”

29. Ayywa

Ayywa is an Arabic word that is used to mean “yes” or “sure”. It is a casual and informal way of expressing agreement or consent.

  • For instance, when someone asks if you want to join them for coffee, a simple “Ayywa” can indicate your willingness.
  • When a friend suggests watching a movie, one might respond, “Ayywa, that sounds like a good idea!”
  • A person might use Ayywa to confirm understanding, saying, “So, I just need to sign this form? Ayywa, I got it.”

30. Tafaddal

Tafaddal is an Arabic term that is used to mean “please” or “go ahead”. It is used as a polite way of giving someone permission to proceed or to invite them to go first.

  • For example, when someone offers you a seat, you might respond, “Tafaddal, thank you!”
  • When holding a door open for someone, you might say, “Tafaddal, after you.”
  • A person might use Tafaddal to invite someone to eat, saying, “Tafaddal, help yourself to the food.”

31. Ma’assalama

A common Arabic phrase used to bid farewell to someone. It is often used when parting ways with friends, family, or acquaintances.

  • For example, when leaving a gathering, one might say, “Ma’assalama, see you soon!”
  • When ending a phone call, a person might say, “Ma’assalama, talk to you later.”
  • Someone might use this phrase when leaving work for the day, saying, “Ma’assalama, have a great evening!”

32. Ya salam

An Arabic expression used to convey surprise, excitement, or astonishment. It is similar to saying “Oh my goodness” or “Wow” in English.

  • For instance, if someone tells you an incredible story, you might respond, “Ya salam, I can’t believe it!”
  • When seeing a beautiful view, a person might exclaim, “Ya salam, this is breathtaking!”
  • If someone receives unexpected good news, they might say, “Ya salam, that’s amazing!”

33. Yaani enta

A phrase commonly used in Arabic conversations to check if the listener understands or agrees with what the speaker is saying. It is similar to saying “You know what I mean?” or “Do you understand?” in English.

  • For example, when explaining a complicated concept, a person might ask, “Yaani enta? Did I explain it clearly?”
  • When sharing a personal experience, someone might say, “I went to the store, yaani enta?” to confirm if the listener is following the story.
  • If discussing a shared opinion, a person might ask, “The weather is so hot, yaani enta?” to see if the listener agrees.
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34. Ya zalame

A casual greeting used among friends or peers in Arabic. It is similar to saying “Hey dude” or “Hey man” in English.

  • For instance, when meeting up with a friend, one might say, “Ya zalame, long time no see!”
  • When addressing a group of friends, someone might say, “Hey ya zalame, what’s the plan for tonight?”
  • If running into a friend unexpectedly, a person might exclaim, “Ya zalame, fancy meeting you here!”

35. Bismillah

An Arabic phrase used to invoke the name of God before starting an action or undertaking. It is often said as a form of prayer or to seek blessings and protection.

  • For example, before eating a meal, a person might say, “Bismillah, let’s dig in!”
  • When beginning a challenging task, someone might say, “Bismillah, here goes nothing.”
  • If embarking on a journey, a person might say, “Bismillah, may God be with us on this trip.”

36. Alhamdulillah

This is an Arabic phrase used to express gratitude or thankfulness to Allah. It is often said in response to good news or blessings received.

  • For example, “I just passed my exam, alhamdulillah!”
  • When someone asks how you are doing, you might respond, “Alhamdulillah, everything is going well.”
  • After a successful event or accomplishment, a person might say, “Alhamdulillah, it was a great success.”

37. Ya habibi

This is an affectionate term used to address someone, often a close friend or loved one. It can also be used to express fondness or endearment.

  • For instance, you might say, “Ya habibi, how have you been?”
  • When expressing love or appreciation, someone might say, “I miss you so much, ya habibi.”
  • If a friend does something kind, you might say, “Thank you, ya habibi, you’re the best!”

38. Ya sitti

This is a term used to address a woman politely and respectfully. It is similar to “madam” or “ma’am” in English.

  • For example, if you want to get a lady’s attention, you might say, “Excuse me, ya sitti.”
  • When showing respect to an older woman, you might say, “Ya sitti, may I help you with that?”
  • In a formal setting, such as a business meeting, you might address a female colleague as “Ya sitti.”

39. Ya ustaz

This term is used to address a male teacher or someone knowledgeable in a particular field. It is a respectful way to refer to someone who imparts knowledge or expertise.

  • For instance, if you have a question for a teacher, you might say, “Excuse me, ya ustaz.”
  • When expressing gratitude for a teacher’s guidance, you might say, “Thank you, ya ustaz, for teaching us.”
  • In a classroom setting, a student might ask, “Ya ustaz, can you explain this concept again?”

40. Ya sheikh

This term is used to address a male religious or spiritual leader, often someone with extensive knowledge and experience in Islamic teachings.

  • For example, if you seek advice or guidance from a sheikh, you might say, “Ya sheikh, I need your help.”
  • When showing respect to a sheikh, you might say, “Ya sheikh, may Allah bless you for your teachings.”
  • During a religious gathering, someone might address the sheikh by saying, “Ya sheikh, please lead us in prayer.”

41. Ya emir

This slang term is used to address someone with authority or power, similar to calling them “prince” or “lord”. It is a respectful way to acknowledge someone’s leadership or status.

  • For example, if someone is giving orders or making important decisions, you might say, “Ya emir, what should we do next?”
  • In a historical context, the term might be used to address a ruler or leader, such as, “Ya emir, the people are in need of your guidance.”
  • A person showing admiration for someone’s leadership qualities might say, “Ya emir, you have a natural talent for inspiring others.”

42. Ya malik

This slang term is used to address someone with great authority or power, similar to calling them “king”. It is a way to show respect and acknowledge someone’s leadership or dominance.

  • For instance, if someone is in control of a situation or making important decisions, you might say, “Ya malik, what is your command?”
  • In a figurative sense, the term might be used to address someone who is highly skilled or talented in a particular field, such as, “Ya malik of the basketball court, show us your moves!”
  • A person expressing admiration for someone’s leadership abilities might say, “Ya malik, you have the ability to inspire and unite people.”

43. Ya sultan

This slang term is used to address someone with great authority or power, similar to calling them “sultan”. It is a way to show reverence and acknowledge someone’s leadership or sovereignty.

  • For example, if someone is in a position of power or control, you might say, “Ya sultan, we await your orders.”
  • In a historical context, the term might be used to address a ruler or monarch, such as, “Ya sultan, the people are grateful for your benevolent rule.”
  • A person expressing admiration for someone’s leadership skills might say, “Ya sultan, your ability to make tough decisions is truly impressive.”

44. Ya sayyid

This slang term is used to address someone with respect, similar to calling them “sir”. It is a way to show deference and acknowledge someone’s authority or social status.

  • For instance, if someone is in a position of authority or expertise, you might say, “Ya sayyid, may I ask for your guidance?”
  • In a formal setting, the term might be used to address someone with a higher social status, such as, “Ya sayyid, your presence here honors us.”
  • A person expressing admiration for someone’s knowledge or skills might say, “Ya sayyid, your expertise in this field is truly impressive.”

45. Shisha

This slang term refers to a water pipe used for smoking flavored tobacco. It is a popular social activity in Arab cultures and is often enjoyed in cafes or at social gatherings.

  • For example, a person might say, “Let’s go to the shisha lounge and relax with some friends.”
  • In a discussion about cultural traditions, one might mention, “Shisha smoking has been a part of Arab culture for centuries.”
  • A person describing their experience with shisha might say, “I love the smooth and flavorful smoke of a good shisha session.”

46. Baba

Baba is an Arabic term that translates to “father”. It is often used as a term of endearment or respect for one’s father.

  • For example, a person might say, “Baba, can you help me with my homework?”
  • In a conversation about family, someone might mention, “My baba always gives the best advice.”
  • A person might affectionately refer to their father as “my baba”.
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47. Mama

Mama is an Arabic term that translates to “mother”. It is a common term used to refer to one’s mother, often used by children or in an affectionate context.

  • For instance, a child might say, “Mama, can you read me a bedtime story?”
  • In a conversation about family, someone might mention, “My mama is the strongest person I know.”
  • A person might lovingly refer to their mother as “my mama”.

48. Yallah shabab

Yallah shabab is an Arabic phrase that translates to “let’s go, guys”. It is commonly used to encourage a group of people to move or start doing something.

  • For example, someone might say, “Yallah shabab, we’re going to be late for the movie.”
  • In a sports context, a coach might say, “Yallah shabab, let’s give it our all in this game.”
  • A person might use the phrase to motivate their friends by saying, “Come on, yallah shabab, let’s conquer this challenge together!”.

49. Yalla khalas

Yalla khalas is an Arabic phrase that translates to “let’s go, that’s enough”. It is commonly used to indicate that something should stop or come to an end.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Yalla khalas, we’ve been talking about this for too long.”
  • In a conversation about a long day at work, someone might say, “Yalla khalas, let’s go home and rest.”
  • A person might use the phrase to express frustration or impatience by saying, “Yalla khalas, I’m tired of waiting for this to happen!”.