Top 43 Slang For Avarice – Meaning & Usage

Avarice, the insatiable desire for wealth and material gain, has long been a topic of fascination and discussion. But have you ever wondered how this concept is expressed in modern slang? Look no further as we unveil a curated list of the top slang terms for avarice that are sure to pique your interest and expand your vocabulary. Join us as we delve into the world of greed and ambition in a whole new light!

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1. Greed

Greed is an intense and selfish desire for wealth or possessions, often at the expense of others. It is the insatiable need to accumulate more and more, regardless of the consequences.

  • For example, a character in a story might be motivated by greed and constantly seek ways to amass wealth.
  • In a discussion about income inequality, someone might argue, “Greed is the root cause of economic disparities.”
  • A person might reflect on their own actions and say, “I used to be driven by greed, but now I prioritize helping others.”

2. Cupidity

Cupidity refers to an intense and selfish desire for wealth or material possessions. It is similar to greed, but often implies a more passionate or intense longing for wealth.

  • For instance, a character in a novel might be driven by cupidity and go to great lengths to acquire wealth.
  • In a discussion about consumerism, someone might argue, “Cupidity drives our society’s obsession with material possessions.”
  • A person might reflect on their own desires and say, “I’ve realized that cupidity doesn’t bring true happiness and fulfillment.”

3. Covetousness

Covetousness is a strong desire to possess something that belongs to someone else. It is the longing for what others have, often leading to envy and a sense of entitlement.

  • For example, a character in a movie might display covetousness and scheme to obtain someone else’s fortune.
  • In a discussion about materialism, someone might argue, “Covetousness fuels our society’s constant craving for more.”
  • A person might reflect on their own feelings and say, “I’ve learned to appreciate what I have and let go of covetousness.”

4. Rapacity

Rapacity refers to aggressive greed or predatory behavior. It implies a voracious appetite for wealth or resources, often accompanied by a willingness to exploit or harm others.

  • For instance, a character in a novel might exhibit rapacity and use manipulative tactics to accumulate wealth.
  • In a discussion about corporate greed, someone might argue, “Rapacity drives unethical business practices.”
  • A person might reflect on societal issues and say, “We need to address the rapacity that perpetuates income inequality.”

5. Avariciousness

Avariciousness is an extreme desire for wealth or material gain. It is characterized by an unquenchable thirst for accumulating possessions and a reluctance to share or give up resources.

  • For example, a character in a play might display avariciousness and prioritize personal wealth over the well-being of others.
  • In a discussion about consumer culture, someone might argue, “Avariciousness drives our society’s constant pursuit of material goods.”
  • A person might reflect on their own mindset and say, “I used to be consumed by avariciousness, but now I prioritize experiences and relationships over material wealth.”

6. Mammonism

This term refers to the excessive pursuit of wealth and material possessions. It is derived from the biblical term “Mammon,” which was used to describe wealth as a false god or idol.

  • For example, “His mammonism drove him to sacrifice his relationships for financial gain.”
  • In a discussion about the negative effects of consumerism, one might say, “Mammonism has led to a society obsessed with material wealth.”
  • A critic of capitalism might argue, “Mammonism is a symptom of a system that prioritizes profit over human well-being.”

7. Grasping

This term describes someone who is excessively greedy or eager to obtain something, often at the expense of others. It implies a strong desire to acquire and hold onto wealth or possessions.

  • For instance, “He showed his true grasping nature when he refused to share the inheritance.”
  • In a conversation about corporate greed, one might say, “The grasping executives prioritized their own bonuses over the well-being of their employees.”
  • A character in a novel might be described as “a grasping villain who would stop at nothing to accumulate wealth.”

8. Acquisitiveness

This term refers to a strong desire to acquire and possess material things. It implies a constant need to accumulate wealth and possessions.

  • For example, “Her acquisitiveness was evident in her extensive collection of designer handbags.”
  • In a discussion about consumer culture, one might say, “Acquisitiveness drives people to constantly seek out the latest gadgets and fashion trends.”
  • A critic of capitalism might argue, “The inherent acquisitiveness of the system perpetuates inequality and fosters a culture of greed.”

9. Materialism

This term describes a belief system or mindset that places a high value on material possessions and wealth. Materialistic individuals prioritize the accumulation of things over experiences or intangible values.

  • For instance, “His materialism was evident in his constant pursuit of luxury goods.”
  • In a conversation about the negative effects of consumerism, one might say, “Materialism has led to a society focused on material wealth rather than personal fulfillment.”
  • A critic of consumer culture might argue, “Materialism breeds dissatisfaction and perpetuates a cycle of endless consumption.”

10. Mercenariness

This term refers to the trait of being motivated primarily by financial gain or personal profit. It implies a willingness to prioritize one’s own interests over the well-being of others.

  • For example, “His mercenariness was evident in his willingness to exploit others for his own financial gain.”
  • In a discussion about corporate ethics, one might say, “The company’s mercenariness led to unethical business practices.”
  • A critic of capitalism might argue, “Mercenariness is a natural consequence of a system that values profit above all else.”

11. Wealth-hoarding

This refers to the act of hoarding or accumulating wealth, often to an excessive or extreme degree. It implies a strong desire to possess and retain wealth, often at the expense of others.

  • For instance, a critic might accuse a billionaire of “wealth-hoarding” while many struggle to make ends meet.
  • In a discussion about income inequality, someone might argue, “We need to address the problem of wealth-hoarding by the top 1%.”
  • A financial advisor might caution against “wealth-hoarding” and encourage clients to invest or donate their excess wealth.
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12. Greediness

This term describes a strong and selfish desire for more than what is needed or deserved. It implies a lack of contentment and an insatiable appetite for acquiring more.

  • For example, a character in a novel might be portrayed as greedy, always seeking to acquire more wealth.
  • In a discussion about corporate greed, someone might say, “The greediness of these companies is harming the environment and exploiting workers.”
  • A parent might caution their child against greediness, saying, “Remember, it’s important to be grateful for what you have and not always want more.”

13. Mammon worship

This term refers to the excessive love or worship of money and material wealth. It suggests that one’s focus and devotion are solely on acquiring and possessing wealth, often to the detriment of other values or relationships.

  • For instance, a religious leader might speak against the dangers of mammon worship, emphasizing the importance of spiritual values over material possessions.
  • In a critique of consumer culture, someone might argue, “Our society has become consumed by mammon worship, valuing money and possessions above all else.”
  • A financial advisor might caution against falling into the trap of mammon worship, encouraging clients to prioritize their overall well-being and happiness over amassing wealth.

14. Money-hungry

This term describes a strong and relentless desire for money and material wealth. It implies a singular focus on acquiring wealth, often at the expense of other priorities or values.

  • For example, a character in a movie might be portrayed as money-hungry, willing to do anything to achieve financial success.
  • In a discussion about the negative effects of capitalism, someone might argue, “The system encourages individuals to become money-hungry, leading to inequality and exploitation.”
  • A businessperson might be described as money-hungry if they prioritize profit above all else, even at the expense of their employees or customers.

15. Greed for gain

This term describes a strong and intense desire for personal gain or profit. It suggests a relentless pursuit of financial success, often at the expense of others or ethical considerations.

  • For instance, a character in a novel might exhibit greed for gain, engaging in unethical business practices to maximize their profits.
  • In a discussion about corporate greed, someone might argue, “The greed for gain among executives leads to unethical behavior and harms society.”
  • A financial analyst might caution against giving in to greed for gain, emphasizing the importance of ethical investing and decision-making.

16. Wealth-obsessed

This term refers to someone who is excessively focused on acquiring and accumulating wealth. It describes a person who prioritizes material possessions and financial gain above all else.

  • For example, “He is so wealth-obsessed that he will do anything to make more money.”
  • In a discussion about the negative effects of consumerism, someone might say, “Our society has become increasingly wealth-obsessed.”
  • A critic of capitalism might argue, “The wealth-obsessed culture perpetuates inequality and greed.”

17. Fortune-hunting

Fortune-hunting refers to the act of actively seeking or pursuing wealth and riches. It implies a relentless pursuit of financial gain and often carries a connotation of greed and opportunism.

  • For instance, “She married a wealthy man solely for his money – she’s a fortune-hunting gold digger.”
  • In a discussion about the motivation behind certain career choices, someone might say, “Some people are driven by fortune-hunting rather than passion.”
  • A critic of materialism might argue, “Our society encourages fortune-hunting and places too much value on wealth.”

18. Stinginess

Stinginess refers to a reluctance or unwillingness to spend or share money. It describes a person who is excessively frugal or tight-fisted, often to the point of being considered cheap or miserly.

  • For example, “He is known for his stinginess – he never pays for anything.”
  • In a discussion about personal finance, someone might say, “I’m trying to overcome my stinginess and learn to enjoy spending money on experiences.”
  • A person might complain, “Her stinginess ruined our group outing – she refused to contribute anything.”

19. Hoarding

Hoarding refers to the act of accumulating and holding on to excessive amounts of wealth or possessions. It implies a desire to possess and control as much as possible, often beyond what is necessary or reasonable.

  • For instance, “He is hoarding wealth and resources while others suffer.”
  • In a discussion about the negative impact of consumerism, someone might say, “Hoarding is a symptom of our materialistic society.”
  • A critic of capitalism might argue, “The hoarding of wealth by the few leads to widespread inequality and poverty.”

20. Filthy lucre

Filthy lucre is a derogatory term used to describe wealth that is considered ill-gotten or morally tainted. It implies that the money has been acquired through dishonest or unethical means.

  • For example, “He will do anything for filthy lucre, even if it means sacrificing his principles.”
  • In a discussion about corruption, someone might say, “The pursuit of filthy lucre has corrupted many individuals and institutions.”
  • A critic of the financial industry might argue, “The pursuit of filthy lucre has led to numerous financial scandals and economic crises.”

21. Mammon-worship

This term refers to the excessive love or worship of money and material possessions. It stems from the biblical term “Mammon,” which is often associated with greed and wealth.

  • For example, someone might criticize a wealthy celebrity by saying, “Their lifestyle is a clear example of Mammon-worship.”
  • In a discussion about the negative effects of consumerism, one might argue, “Our society is plagued by Mammon-worship.”
  • A person might confess, “I used to be caught up in Mammon-worship, but I’ve learned to prioritize other things in life.”

22. Penny-pinching

This term describes a person who is excessively careful or thrifty with their money. It implies a strong desire to save and avoid unnecessary expenses.

  • For instance, someone might say, “My grandmother is the queen of penny-pinching. She never spends a dime if she doesn’t have to.”
  • In a conversation about budgeting, one might suggest, “If you want to save more, try adopting some penny-pinching habits.”
  • A person might admit, “I used to be a penny-pincher, but I’ve learned to find a balance between saving and enjoying life.”

23. Money-grabbing

This term describes someone who is excessively eager or greedy for money. It implies a strong desire to acquire wealth at all costs.

  • For example, a person might criticize a corporate executive by saying, “They are only interested in money-grabbing and have no regard for the well-being of their employees.”
  • In a discussion about the negative effects of capitalism, one might argue, “Our society encourages money-grabbing behavior.”
  • A person might confess, “I used to be money-grabbing, but I’ve realized that true happiness doesn’t come from wealth alone.”

24. Profit-seeking

This term refers to the pursuit of profit or financial gain. It implies a focus on maximizing one’s earnings and making money a top priority.

  • For instance, a person might say, “In a capitalist society, profit-seeking is the driving force behind most businesses.”
  • In a conversation about entrepreneurship, one might suggest, “Successful entrepreneurs are often driven by their profit-seeking mindset.”
  • A person might admit, “I used to be solely profit-seeking, but I’ve learned to value other aspects of life as well.”

25. Money-mad

This term describes someone who is excessively preoccupied or obsessed with money. It implies a strong fixation on wealth and material possessions.

  • For example, a person might say, “He’s money-mad. All he ever thinks about is how to make more money.”
  • In a discussion about the negative effects of consumerism, one might argue, “Our society is becoming increasingly money-mad.”
  • A person might confess, “I used to be money-mad, but I’ve realized that there’s more to life than just accumulating wealth.”

26. Wealth-chasing

This term refers to the act of actively seeking and pursuing wealth. It describes individuals who are driven by the desire to accumulate money and material possessions.

  • For example, “He is always on the lookout for new business opportunities. He’s definitely wealth-chasing.”
  • In a discussion about the finance industry, someone might comment, “Many people in this field are wealth-chasing individuals.”
  • A critic of capitalism might argue, “The system encourages wealth-chasing at the expense of social welfare.”

27. Money-mongering

This phrase describes the excessive or greedy pursuit of money. It implies that individuals are solely focused on making money and will engage in any means necessary to achieve financial gain.

  • For instance, “Some people accuse politicians of money-mongering, prioritizing personal wealth over public welfare.”
  • In a conversation about corporate greed, someone might say, “The executives of that company are known for their money-mongering.”
  • A critic of capitalism might argue, “The profit-driven system encourages money-mongering behaviors.”

28. Covetous

This term describes a strong desire to possess wealth or material possessions that belong to someone else. It implies envy and a longing for what others have in terms of financial resources.

  • For example, “She couldn’t help but feel covetous when she saw her neighbor’s luxurious car.”
  • In a discussion about consumerism, someone might comment, “Our society promotes covetous behavior through constant advertising.”
  • A critic of materialism might argue, “Covetousness fuels the never-ending pursuit of wealth and possessions.”

29. Money-driven

This phrase describes individuals who are primarily motivated by money in their actions and decision-making. It suggests that financial gain is the main driving force behind their behavior.

  • For instance, “He took the job because he’s money-driven, not because he’s passionate about the work.”
  • In a discussion about career choices, someone might say, “Many people in the finance industry are money-driven.”
  • A critic of capitalism might argue, “The profit-driven system rewards money-driven individuals at the expense of social well-being.”

30. Wealth-accumulating

This term refers to the act of gathering and accumulating wealth over time. It implies a deliberate effort to increase one’s financial resources and assets.

  • For example, “He invested wisely and focused on wealth-accumulating strategies.”
  • In a conversation about personal finance, someone might comment, “The key to financial independence is consistent wealth-accumulating.”
  • A critic of wealth inequality might argue, “The system favors the wealthy, allowing for easier wealth-accumulating for those who are already well-off.”

31. Money-centric

This term describes someone or something that is primarily concerned with money or financial gain.

  • For example, a business might be described as “money-centric” if its main goal is to maximize profits.
  • A person who is always thinking about money and making more of it could be said to have a “money-centric” mindset.
  • In a conversation about career choices, someone might say, “I want to find a job that is fulfilling and meaningful, not just money-centric.”

32. Greed for riches

This phrase refers to a strong and selfish desire to acquire great wealth or riches.

  • For instance, a person who is willing to do anything, even unethical or illegal actions, to become rich could be described as having a “greed for riches.”
  • In a discussion about the negative effects of greed, someone might say, “Greed for riches can lead to corruption and harm to others.”
  • A character in a novel or movie who is driven by a relentless greed for riches might be portrayed as the antagonist.
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33. Wealth-seeking

This term describes someone who is actively seeking or pursuing wealth and financial success.

  • For example, an entrepreneur who starts multiple businesses with the goal of becoming wealthy could be described as “wealth-seeking.”
  • In a conversation about career aspirations, someone might say, “I’m not necessarily wealth-seeking, but I do want to have financial security and stability.”
  • A person who is constantly looking for new investment opportunities and ways to grow their wealth could be described as “wealth-seeking.”

34. Money-focused

This term describes someone or something that is primarily focused on money and financial matters.

  • For instance, a business that prioritizes profit above all else could be described as “money-focused.”
  • A person who is constantly thinking about money and how to make more of it could be described as “money-focused.”
  • In a discussion about personal finance, someone might say, “It’s important to be money-focused and make smart financial decisions.”

35. Greed for money

This phrase refers to a strong and selfish desire to acquire more money.

  • For example, someone who is willing to sacrifice their values or harm others in order to obtain more money could be described as having a “greed for money.”
  • In a conversation about the negative effects of greed, someone might say, “Greed for money can lead to unethical behavior and a disregard for others.”
  • A character in a story who is driven by a relentless greed for money might be portrayed as a villain or antagonist.

36. Wealth-obsession

This term refers to an intense preoccupation or fixation on acquiring and accumulating wealth. It describes a mindset focused solely on money and material possessions.

  • For instance, “His wealth-obsession led him to work long hours and neglect his personal relationships.”
  • In a discussion about the negative effects of capitalism, someone might argue, “Wealth-obsession is driving income inequality.”
  • A critic of consumer culture might say, “Our society’s wealth-obsession is causing us to prioritize material gain over personal well-being.”

37. Money-chasing

This slang term describes the relentless pursuit of money and financial success. It implies a single-minded focus on acquiring wealth, often at the expense of other aspects of life.

  • For example, “He’s always money-chasing, constantly looking for ways to make more and more.”
  • In a conversation about career choices, someone might say, “I decided to pursue my passion instead of money-chasing.”
  • A financial advisor might caution against money-chasing, saying, “Remember that happiness and fulfillment can’t always be found in financial wealth.”

38. Greed for wealth

This phrase describes an insatiable and excessive desire for wealth. It suggests a strong and uncontrolled craving for material possessions and financial gain.

  • For instance, “His greed for wealth knows no bounds; he will do anything to accumulate more money.”
  • In a discussion about corporate greed, someone might argue, “The greed for wealth among CEOs is causing income inequality.”
  • A critic of capitalism might say, “Our society’s greed for wealth is eroding our values and sense of community.”

39. Wealth-driven

This term describes individuals or actions that are primarily motivated by the pursuit of wealth. It suggests that money is the driving force behind their decisions and behaviors.

  • For example, “The company’s culture is wealth-driven, with employees solely focused on financial success.”
  • In a conversation about career choices, someone might say, “I don’t want to be in a wealth-driven industry; I value work-life balance more.”
  • A financial advisor might caution against a wealth-driven mindset, saying, “Remember to prioritize your values and overall well-being, not just financial gain.”

40. Money-loving

This slang term describes a strong affinity or fondness for money. It suggests a deep appreciation for the value and importance of wealth.

  • For instance, “He’s always been money-loving; even as a child, he would save every penny.”
  • In a discussion about personal finance, someone might say, “Being money-loving doesn’t mean being greedy; it means being financially savvy.”
  • A financial planner might advise, “It’s important to be money-loving, but also to find a balance between enjoying your wealth and saving for the future.”

41. Greed for possessions

This term refers to the excessive desire for material possessions or wealth. It is the belief that acquiring and owning material goods is the most important aspect of life.

  • For instance, someone might say, “His greed for possessions knows no bounds. He’s always buying expensive cars and designer clothes.”
  • In a discussion about consumerism, one might argue, “Materialism has led to a society that values things over experiences.”
  • A critic of capitalism might claim, “The system promotes greed for possessions and perpetuates inequality.”

42. Wealth-pursuing

This term describes someone who is actively seeking or pursuing wealth. It implies a relentless pursuit of financial success and a focus on accumulating wealth.

  • For example, a motivational speaker might say, “Be wealth-pursuing, not just money-chasing. Focus on building long-term financial security.”
  • In a conversation about career choices, someone might advise, “Don’t just chase money, find a career that aligns with your passions.”
  • A critic of materialism might argue, “Our society’s obsession with wealth-pursuing is causing us to lose sight of what truly matters.”

43. Money-obsessed

This term describes someone who is excessively focused on money and wealth. It implies a preoccupation with financial gain and a disregard for other aspects of life.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He’s so money-obsessed that he’s willing to do anything for a quick buck.”
  • In a discussion about societal values, one might argue, “Our culture’s obsession with being money-obsessed is leading to a decline in empathy and compassion.”
  • A critic of consumerism might claim, “The constant pursuit of material wealth has made us a money-obsessed society.”