Top 59 Slang For Bad Feeling – Meaning & Usage

Ever experienced a moment where you just couldn’t find the right words to describe that awful feeling in your gut? Well, fear not, because we’ve got your back. Our team has scoured the depths of slang vocabulary to bring you a list of the most relatable and spot-on expressions for that bad feeling you just can’t shake. Get ready to nod your head in agreement as we unveil these gems that perfectly encapsulate those not-so-great moments.

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1. Bummed out

When something doesn’t go as planned, you might feel bummed out.

  • For example, “I was really looking forward to the concert, but it got canceled. I’m so bummed out.”
  • If a friend cancels plans last minute, you might say, “I was really excited to hang out, now I’m just bummed out.”
  • After receiving bad news, you might express, “I’m feeling really bummed out about it.”

2. Down in the dumps

When you’re feeling low and sad, you might say you’re down in the dumps.

  • For instance, “I’ve been going through a tough time lately, and I’m feeling really down in the dumps.”
  • If a friend is feeling down, you might ask, “What’s been going on? You seem really down in the dumps.”
  • After a breakup, someone might say, “I’m feeling really down in the dumps right now.”

3. Blue

Feeling blue is a way to describe feeling sad or down.

  • For example, “I don’t know why, but I’ve been feeling really blue lately.”
  • If a friend is feeling down, you might say, “You seem a bit blue. Is everything okay?”
  • After a disappointment, someone might say, “I’m feeling pretty blue about it.”

4. Gloomy

Gloomy describes a feeling of darkness or sadness.

  • For instance, “The rainy weather is making me feel gloomy.”
  • If a friend is feeling down, you might say, “You seem a bit gloomy today. Anything on your mind?”
  • After a loss, someone might say, “I’m feeling gloomy about it.”

5. Melancholy

Melancholy refers to a profound feeling of sadness or sorrow.

  • For example, “Listening to sad music makes me feel melancholy.”
  • If a friend is feeling down, you might ask, “Are you feeling melancholy? Anything you want to talk about?”
  • After a breakup, someone might express, “I’ve been feeling really melancholy lately.”

6. Disheartened

Feeling discouraged or demoralized.

  • For example, “I was disheartened when I didn’t get the job.”
  • A student might say, “I felt disheartened after receiving a low grade on my exam.”
  • Someone might express, “The constant rejection made me feel disheartened about finding love.”

7. Dejected

Feeling sad or depressed.

  • For instance, “She looked dejected after her team lost the game.”
  • A person might say, “I feel dejected when I’m left out of social events.”
  • Another might express, “Receiving criticism can leave me feeling dejected.”

8. Despondent

Feeling extreme sadness or hopelessness.

  • For example, “He became despondent after his business failed.”
  • A person might say, “I feel despondent about the state of the world.”
  • Another might express, “Losing a loved one can leave you feeling despondent.”

9. Crestfallen

Feeling disappointed or let down.

  • For instance, “She was crestfallen when she didn’t get the promotion.”
  • A person might say, “I felt crestfallen when my favorite team lost the championship.”
  • Another might express, “Receiving negative feedback can leave you feeling crestfallen.”

10. Miserable

Feeling extremely unhappy or miserable.

  • For example, “I was miserable after the breakup.”
  • A person might say, “I feel miserable when I’m sick.”
  • Another might express, “Being stuck in traffic makes me miserable.”

11. Sullen

Sullen refers to a mood or demeanor that is gloomy, sulky, or withdrawn. It often implies a bad or negative feeling without being openly hostile or aggressive.

  • For example, “He sat in the corner with a sullen expression on his face.”
  • A parent might say to their child, “Don’t give me that sullen attitude.”
  • In a review of a movie, a critic might describe the atmosphere as “sullen and brooding.”

12. Wretched

Wretched is a word used to describe a state of extreme unhappiness or misery. It conveys a sense of deep distress or suffering.

  • For instance, “She felt wretched after the breakup.”
  • A person might exclaim, “I had a wretched day at work.”
  • In a novel, the author might write, “The wretched conditions of the slums were unbearable.”

13. Dismal

Dismal refers to something that is depressing, dreary, or gloomy. It suggests a feeling of sadness or hopelessness.

  • For example, “The weather outside was dismal, with gray skies and constant rain.”
  • A student might describe their performance on a test as “dismal.”
  • In a conversation about a failing business, someone might say, “The company’s financial situation is dismal.”

14. Morose

Morose describes a person who is gloomy, ill-tempered, or sullen. It suggests a sour or negative disposition.

  • For instance, “He sat alone in the corner, looking morose.”
  • A friend might say, “Why are you so morose lately?”
  • In a book review, a critic might describe a character as “morose and brooding.”

15. Glum

Glum is a word used to describe a person who appears sad, dejected, or downcast. It suggests a lack of enthusiasm or optimism.

  • For example, “She had a glum expression on her face after receiving bad news.”
  • A teacher might notice a student’s glum mood and ask, “Is everything okay?”
  • In a discussion about the economy, someone might say, “Consumer confidence is low, leading to glum economic forecasts.”

16. Woeful

This word is used to describe a feeling of deep sadness or misery.

  • For example, “She had a woeful expression on her face.”
  • A person might say, “I had a woeful day at work today.”
  • Another might describe a movie as, “a woeful tale of love and loss.”

17. Forlorn

This word is used to describe a feeling of being abandoned or hopeless.

  • For instance, “He sat in the corner, looking forlorn and lost.”
  • A person might say, “I feel forlorn without my best friend.”
  • Another might describe a desolate landscape as, “a forlorn place with no signs of life.”

18. Bleak

This word is used to describe a feeling of gloominess or depression.

  • For example, “The weather outside was bleak and rainy.”
  • A person might say, “I received some bleak news today.”
  • Another might describe a future outlook as, “a bleak and uncertain future.”

19. Lousy

This word is used to describe a feeling of something being terrible or unpleasant.

  • For instance, “I had a lousy day at work.”
  • A person might say, “This restaurant has lousy service.”
  • Another might describe a movie as, “a lousy film with a predictable plot.”

20. Crummy

This word is used to describe a feeling of something being bad or inferior.

  • For example, “I had a crummy experience at the store.”
  • A person might say, “The hotel room was crummy and dirty.”
  • Another might describe a meal as, “a crummy sandwich with stale bread.”

21. Awful

This word is used to describe something that is extremely bad or unpleasant.

  • For example, “That movie was awful. I couldn’t stand it.”
  • A person might say, “I had an awful day at work. Everything went wrong.”
  • Another might exclaim, “The weather is awful today. It’s raining heavily.”

22. Horrible

This word is used to describe something that is extremely bad or unpleasant.

  • For instance, “I had a horrible nightmare last night. It was so scary.”
  • A person might say, “The food at that restaurant was horrible. I couldn’t eat it.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I feel horrible. I think I’m coming down with a cold.”

23. Rotten

This word is used to describe something that is in a state of decay or decomposition, often resulting in a bad smell or taste.

  • For example, “I left the food out overnight and now it’s rotten.”
  • A person might say, “The milk has gone rotten. It smells terrible.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I can’t eat this fruit. It’s all rotten.”

24. Nauseous

This word is used to describe a feeling of sickness or discomfort in the stomach, often leading to the urge to vomit.

  • For instance, “The smell of that food makes me nauseous.”
  • A person might say, “I feel nauseous after the roller coaster ride.”
  • Another might exclaim, “The medicine makes me feel queasy and nauseous.”

25. Queasy

This word is used to describe a feeling of sickness or discomfort in the stomach, often leading to the urge to vomit.

  • For example, “The bumpy car ride made me feel queasy.”
  • A person might say, “I always get queasy when I’m on a boat.”
  • Another might exclaim, “The smell of that food makes me queasy.”

26. Unsettled

The term “unsettled” refers to a state of unease or discomfort. It can describe a feeling of uncertainty or instability.

  • For example, “I have this unsettled feeling in the pit of my stomach.”
  • A person might say, “I feel unsettled about the upcoming exam.”
  • In a discussion about a difficult decision, someone might express, “I’m still unsettled about which option to choose.”

27. Uneasy

When someone feels “uneasy,” they are experiencing a sense of discomfort or concern. It can be a general feeling of unease or a specific reaction to a situation.

  • For instance, “I have an uneasy feeling about this situation.”
  • A person might say, “I always feel uneasy when I have to speak in public.”
  • In a discussion about a suspicious person, someone might comment, “Their behavior made me uneasy.”

28. Anxious

The term “anxious” describes a state of worry or nervousness. It can be a response to a specific situation or a general feeling of unease.

  • For example, “I’m feeling anxious about the job interview tomorrow.”
  • A person might say, “I always get anxious before a big presentation.”
  • In a discussion about a stressful event, someone might express, “I was so anxious during the final moments of the game.”

29. Troubled

When someone is “troubled,” they are experiencing emotional distress or disturbance. It can refer to a state of inner turmoil or a reaction to external circumstances.

  • For instance, “He has a troubled past that he’s still dealing with.”
  • A person might say, “I feel troubled by the current state of the world.”
  • In a discussion about a difficult relationship, someone might comment, “She has a troubled marriage.”

30. Distressed

The term “distressed” describes a state of extreme sadness or suffering. It can refer to emotional or psychological distress.

  • For example, “She looked visibly distressed after receiving the bad news.”
  • A person might say, “I feel distressed about the loss of a loved one.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, someone might express, “It’s important to seek help when feeling distressed.”

31. Agitated

Feeling restless or on edge, often due to a specific situation or circumstance.

  • For example, “I’m feeling really agitated about the upcoming exam.”
  • Someone might say, “The constant noise in the office is making me feel agitated.”
  • Another person might comment, “I always get agitated when I have to speak in public.”

32. Restless

Feeling uneasy or unsettled, often accompanied by the desire to move or be active.

  • For instance, “I couldn’t sleep last night because I was feeling restless.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m feeling restless and need to go for a walk to clear my mind.”
  • Another person might comment, “Whenever I’m waiting for news, I become restless and can’t sit still.”

33. Tense

Feeling a state of mental or emotional strain, often caused by stress or anticipation.

  • For example, “I’m feeling really tense before the big presentation.”
  • Someone might say, “The tense atmosphere in the room made it difficult to relax.”
  • Another person might comment, “I always feel tense when I have to confront someone about an issue.”

34. Stressed out

Feeling extremely worried, anxious, or burdened by a situation or task.

  • For instance, “I’m so stressed out about the upcoming deadline.”
  • Someone might say, “I can’t handle any more stress. I’m already stressed out.”
  • Another person might comment, “Being constantly stressed out is taking a toll on my mental health.”

35. Panicked

Experiencing a sudden and overwhelming sense of fear or anxiety, often accompanied by a loss of control.

  • For example, “I panicked when I realized I had lost my wallet.”
  • Someone might say, “In a moment of panic, I called for help.”
  • Another person might comment, “I tend to panic in crowded places due to my social anxiety.”

36. Terrified

To be in a state of intense fear or dread.

  • For example, “I was absolutely terrified when I saw a spider crawling on my arm.”
  • A person might say, “I’m terrified of heights, so I avoid tall buildings.”
  • Another might share, “The horror movie was so scary, it left me terrified for days.”

37. Petrified

To be completely paralyzed with fear or terror.

  • For instance, “I was petrified when I heard a loud noise in the middle of the night.”
  • A person might say, “I’m petrified of public speaking, so I avoid it at all costs.”
  • Another might share, “The haunted house was so terrifying, it left me petrified.”

38. Frightened

To feel fear or apprehension.

  • For example, “I was frightened by the sudden loud bang.”
  • A person might say, “I’m frightened of dogs, so I always cross the street when I see one.”
  • Another might share, “The horror movie was so intense, it left me frightened and jumpy.”

39. Scared stiff

To be so frightened that one is unable to move or act.

  • For instance, “I was scared stiff when I saw a ghost in my bedroom.”
  • A person might say, “I’m scared stiff of snakes, so I can’t even look at pictures of them.”
  • Another might share, “The haunted house was so terrifying, it left me scared stiff.”

40. Spooked

To feel uneasy or jumpy, often as a result of something unexpected or frightening.

  • For example, “I was spooked by a loud noise outside my window.”
  • A person might say, “I get spooked easily in the dark, so I always keep a nightlight on.”
  • Another might share, “The suspenseful movie had me spooked throughout.”

41. Jittery

Feeling anxious or on edge, often characterized by shaky or unsteady movements.

  • For example, “I always get jittery before a big presentation.”
  • A person might say, “I felt so jittery during the roller coaster ride.”
  • Another might describe their nerves as, “I have a jittery feeling in my stomach.”

42. Shaken

Feeling disturbed or upset, often as a result of a shocking or unsettling event.

  • For instance, “She was shaken by the news of the accident.”
  • A person might say, “I felt shaken after witnessing the car crash.”
  • Another might describe their emotional state as, “I’m still feeling shaken from the incident.”

43. Disconcerted

Feeling unsettled or thrown off balance, often due to something unexpected or unfamiliar.

  • For example, “She was disconcerted by the sudden change in plans.”
  • A person might say, “I felt disconcerted when I couldn’t find my way back.”
  • Another might describe their unease as, “I’m feeling disconcerted in this unfamiliar environment.”

44. Perturbed

Feeling annoyed or bothered, often as a result of someone or something causing a disturbance or irritation.

  • For instance, “He was perturbed by the constant noise outside his window.”
  • A person might say, “I felt perturbed when my coworker kept interrupting me.”
  • Another might describe their frustration as, “I’m so perturbed by the lack of communication.”

45. Upset

Feeling distressed or emotionally disturbed, often due to something upsetting or disappointing.

  • For example, “She was upset by the outcome of the game.”
  • A person might say, “I felt upset when I heard the bad news.”
  • Another might describe their emotional state as, “I’m really upset about what happened.”

46. Sorrowful

Feeling or showing sadness or grief.

  • For example, “She looked sorrowful as she read the news.”
  • A person might say, “I felt sorrowful when I heard about the tragedy.”
  • In a poem, the author might describe a character as having a sorrowful expression.
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47. Unhappy

Feeling or showing discontent or dissatisfaction.

  • For instance, “She had an unhappy expression on her face.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling unhappy with my current job.”
  • In a relationship, one might express, “I’ve been feeling unhappy lately.”

48. Agonized

Experiencing intense physical or mental pain or suffering.

  • For example, “He looked agonized as he clutched his chest.”
  • A person might say, “I felt agonized after the accident.”
  • In a movie, a character might have an agonized expression during a dramatic scene.

49. Anguished

Experiencing severe mental or physical pain or suffering.

  • For instance, “She let out an anguished cry.”
  • A person might say, “I was anguished when I received the devastating news.”
  • In a novel, the author might describe a character’s anguished expression.

50. Heartbroken

Overwhelmed with great sadness or grief.

  • For example, “She was heartbroken after her pet passed away.”
  • A person might say, “I felt heartbroken when I found out about the betrayal.”
  • In a song, the lyrics might express the feeling of being heartbroken.

51. Melancholic

This term refers to a deep and prolonged sadness or a feeling of being downcast. It often describes a state of mind that is characterized by a sense of loss or longing.

  • For example, “She listened to melancholic music to match her mood.”
  • A person might say, “I feel so melancholic today, I can’t seem to shake off this feeling.”
  • Another might write, “The gray and rainy weather made me feel melancholic.”

52. Pained

This word describes a feeling of physical or emotional distress. It often implies a deep sense of discomfort or anguish.

  • For instance, “He wore a pained expression on his face.”
  • Someone might say, “I could see the pained look in her eyes.”
  • Another might write, “Her pained screams echoed through the house.”

53. Desolate

This term describes a feeling of loneliness, emptiness, or abandonment. It often refers to a place or a state of mind that is devoid of life or hope.

  • For example, “Walking through the desolate streets, he felt a sense of despair.”
  • A person might say, “The desolate landscape mirrored her inner turmoil.”
  • Another might write, “The desolate house stood in stark contrast to the vibrant neighborhood.”

54. Depressed

This word describes a state of mind characterized by feelings of extreme sadness, hopelessness, and a lack of energy or motivation. It is often used to describe a clinical condition known as depression.

  • For instance, “She has been feeling depressed for weeks.”
  • Someone might say, “I can’t seem to shake off this feeling of being depressed.”
  • Another might write, “He sought help for his depressed state of mind.”

55. Tormented

This term refers to a state of being in which one is experiencing intense mental or emotional anguish. It often implies a feeling of being trapped or haunted by distressing thoughts or memories.

  • For example, “He was tormented by his past mistakes.”
  • A person might say, “I feel tormented by my own thoughts.”
  • Another might write, “She lived a tormented life, haunted by her past.”

56. Mournful

This word describes a feeling of deep sadness or grief, often associated with the loss of someone or something significant.

  • For example, “She felt mournful after the death of her beloved pet.”
  • A person might say, “The mournful music made me think about all the things I’ve lost.”
  • In a poem, the author might describe a character as having “mournful eyes.”

57. Distraught

This word describes a state of extreme emotional distress or agitation, often due to a traumatic event or overwhelming situation.

  • For instance, “She was distraught after receiving the news of her father’s illness.”
  • A person might say, “I was so distraught that I couldn’t think clearly.”
  • In a movie, a character might be shown as distraught when they receive a devastating phone call.
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58. Disconsolate

This word describes a feeling of extreme sadness or despair, often accompanied by a sense of hopelessness or loneliness.

  • For example, “He was disconsolate after his long-term relationship ended.”
  • A person might say, “I felt disconsolate when I realized I had lost all my savings.”
  • In a novel, the author might describe a character as sitting alone in a disconsolate state.

59. Angst-ridden

This word describes a state of being filled with inner turmoil, anxiety, or existential dread.

  • For instance, “She was angst-ridden about making the right decision for her future.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been feeling so angst-ridden lately, I can’t sleep.”
  • In a song, the lyrics might express the angst-ridden emotions of the artist.