Top 45 Slang For Bad Influence – Meaning & Usage

Are you ready to dive into the world of bad influence slang? Whether you’re a parent trying to decode your teen’s language or just curious about the latest trends, we’ve got you covered. Our team has scoured the depths of slang to bring you a curated list of the top slang for bad influence. Get ready to expand your vocabulary and stay in the know with this must-read listicle.

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1. Toxic

This term is used to describe someone or something that has a negative impact on others or their surroundings. It is often used to refer to individuals who exhibit manipulative or destructive behavior.

  • For example, “That toxic friend is always bringing drama into my life.”
  • In a discussion about workplace dynamics, someone might say, “Toxic work environments can lead to high turnover and low morale.”
  • A person reflecting on a past relationship might say, “I had to cut ties with my toxic ex because they were draining my energy.”

2. Trouble

This term is used to describe someone who is prone to causing difficulties or getting into mischief. It can also refer to a situation or circumstance that is challenging or risky.

  • For instance, “He’s always getting into trouble with the law.”
  • In a conversation about parenting, someone might say, “My teenager is giving me a lot of trouble lately.”
  • A person discussing financial struggles might say, “I’m in trouble with my credit card debt.”

3. Corrupt

This term is used to describe individuals, institutions, or systems that are involved in illegal or unethical activities. It implies a lack of integrity and a willingness to exploit others for personal gain.

  • For example, “The corrupt politician was caught accepting bribes.”
  • In a discussion about corporate scandals, someone might say, “Corrupt executives were embezzling millions of dollars.”
  • A person reflecting on a corrupt government might say, “The citizens suffered under a corrupt regime for years.”

4. Poison

This term is used metaphorically to describe someone or something that has a detrimental effect on others or a situation. It implies that the presence or involvement of the person or thing is detrimental and can lead to negative outcomes.

  • For instance, “Her toxic relationship was like poison to her mental health.”
  • In a conversation about a toxic workplace, someone might say, “Gossip and negativity spread like poison in that office.”
  • A person reflecting on a past addiction might say, “Drugs were like poison to my life, but I’ve overcome it.”

5. Bad apple

This term is used to refer to a person who is considered to be a negative influence or troublemaker within a group or community. It suggests that the individual’s behavior or actions stand out in a negative way.

  • For example, “He’s the bad apple in our friend group, always causing drama.”
  • In a discussion about a dysfunctional team, someone might say, “We need to address the bad apple to improve productivity.”
  • A person reflecting on a toxic friendship might say, “I had to cut ties with the bad apple because they were dragging me down.”

6. Rotten egg

This term refers to a person who is a bad influence or causes trouble. It is often used to describe someone who consistently engages in negative or disruptive behavior.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Billy is a rotten egg. He’s always disrupting the class.”
  • In a group of friends, someone might comment, “We should avoid hanging out with that guy, he’s a rotten egg.”
  • A parent might warn their child, “Stay away from those kids, they’re nothing but trouble.”

7. Miscreant

A miscreant is a person who behaves badly or engages in immoral or illegal activities. It is a term used to describe someone who is a bad influence or has a negative impact on others.

  • For instance, a news report might refer to a criminal as a miscreant.
  • In a conversation about social behavior, one might say, “We need to address the miscreants in our society.”
  • A teacher might warn their students, “Don’t associate with those miscreants, they’ll only lead you astray.”

8. Delinquent

Delinquent is a term used to describe someone, usually a young person, who regularly engages in illegal or antisocial behavior. It often refers to individuals who have a history of breaking the law or causing trouble.

  • For example, a police officer might refer to a young offender as a delinquent.
  • In a discussion about juvenile crime, one might say, “We need to find ways to rehabilitate delinquents.”
  • A concerned parent might say, “I’m worried that my son is becoming delinquent.”

9. Malefactor

A malefactor is a person who commits a crime or engages in wrongful behavior. It is a term used to describe someone who is a bad influence or has a negative impact on society.

  • For instance, a prosecutor might refer to a defendant as a malefactor.
  • In a conversation about ethics, one might say, “We must hold malefactors accountable for their actions.”
  • A citizen discussing crime might comment, “We need to address the root causes that lead to malefactors.”

10. Rogue

A rogue is a person who behaves in a rebellious or unorthodox manner, often disregarding social conventions or laws. It is a term used to describe someone who is seen as a bad influence or a troublemaker.

  • For example, a journalist might describe a corrupt politician as a rogue.
  • In a discussion about morality, one might say, “Society needs to protect itself from rogues.”
  • A concerned citizen might comment, “We can’t let rogues dictate our values and norms.”

11. Villain

A villain is a character or person who is typically portrayed as evil or morally corrupt. The term is often used to describe someone who engages in malicious or harmful actions.

  • For example, in a superhero movie, the villain might be a supervillain with plans to take over the world.
  • In a crime novel, the detective might be trying to catch a notorious villain who has been terrorizing the city.
  • In everyday conversation, someone might say, “He’s such a villain, always causing trouble wherever he goes.”

12. Scoundrel

A scoundrel is a person who is dishonest, unscrupulous, or morally questionable. The term is often used to describe someone who engages in deceitful or underhanded behavior.

  • For instance, in a historical novel, the protagonist might encounter a scoundrel who tries to swindle them out of their inheritance.
  • In a conversation about politics, someone might refer to a corrupt politician as a scoundrel.
  • In a lighthearted context, someone might jokingly say, “You scoundrel, you tricked me into doing all the work!”

13. Ne’er-do-well

A ne’er-do-well is a person who is lazy, unreliable, or generally unproductive. The term is often used to describe someone who doesn’t have a steady job or who consistently fails to meet expectations.

  • For example, in a family drama, one of the characters might be a ne’er-do-well who constantly relies on others for support.
  • In a conversation about a friend who never follows through on plans, someone might say, “He’s a bit of a ne’er-do-well.”
  • In a humorous context, someone might playfully say, “I’m a proud ne’er-do-well, living life on my own terms!”

14. Degenerate

A degenerate is a person who is morally corrupt or whose behavior is deteriorating. The term is often used to describe someone who engages in immoral or self-destructive actions.

  • For instance, in a psychological thriller, the main character might become a degenerate as they spiral into a life of addiction and crime.
  • In a discussion about societal decay, someone might argue that the rise of degenerates is a symptom of a larger problem.
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “Don’t hang out with him, he’s a degenerate who will only lead you astray.”

15. Cad

A cad is a man who is untrustworthy, dishonorable, or lacking in integrity. The term is often used to describe someone who behaves in a deceitful or disrespectful manner, especially towards women.

  • For example, in a period drama, a cad might be a charming but unfaithful gentleman who pursues multiple romantic interests.
  • In a conversation about dating, someone might warn their friend about a potential partner, saying, “Watch out for him, he’s a bit of a cad.”
  • In a playful context, someone might jokingly say, “Oh, don’t mind me, I’m just a lovable cad!”

16. Black sheep

This term refers to a person who is considered different or deviant from the rest of their family or group. The black sheep is often seen as a bad influence or troublemaker.

  • For example, in a conversation about family dynamics, someone might say, “I’m the black sheep of my family because I chose a non-traditional career.”
  • In a discussion about a group of friends, one might say, “He’s the black sheep of the group. Always getting into trouble.”
  • A person reflecting on their past might say, “I used to be the black sheep, but I’ve turned my life around now.”

17. Hoodlum

This term refers to a person who engages in criminal or illegal activities. Hoodlums are often associated with violence, gang activity, and a general disregard for the law.

  • For instance, in a news report about a gang-related incident, the reporter might mention, “The neighborhood has been plagued by hoodlums.”
  • In a conversation about safety in a certain area, someone might say, “Watch out for the hoodlums in that part of town.”
  • A person discussing crime prevention might argue, “We need to address the root causes that lead young people to become hoodlums.”

18. Misleader

This term refers to a person who intentionally leads others astray or provides false information. Misleaders often manipulate others for personal gain or to achieve their own agenda.

  • For example, in a discussion about politics, someone might say, “Politicians are often seen as misleaders who make promises they can’t keep.”
  • In a conversation about a fraudulent business, one might say, “The CEO of that company turned out to be a misleader who embezzled funds.”
  • A person warning others about a scam might say, “Be careful of online misleaders who try to trick you into giving them your personal information.”

19. Malevolent

This term refers to a person who has or shows a desire to harm others or see others suffer. Malevolent individuals often act with ill intent and take pleasure in causing harm.

  • For instance, in a discussion about a villain in a movie, someone might say, “The character is portrayed as a malevolent force, seeking revenge on those who wronged them.”
  • In a conversation about a toxic friendship, one might say, “She has a malevolent nature and enjoys manipulating others.”
  • A person describing a harmful act might say, “His actions were driven by a malevolent desire to hurt others.”

20. Maleficent

This term refers to a person or entity that is extremely wicked or harmful. Maleficent individuals are often associated with dark and sinister actions.

  • For example, in a discussion about a horror movie, someone might say, “The antagonist is a maleficent being with supernatural powers.”
  • In a conversation about a historical figure known for their cruelty, one might say, “He was a maleficent ruler who caused immense suffering.”
  • A person describing a malicious act might say, “The suspect committed a maleficent act of violence.”

21. Malefic

Malefic is a term used to describe someone or something that is intentionally harmful or evil. It is often used to refer to a person who has bad intentions or who causes harm to others.

  • For example, “He has a malefic nature and always tries to manipulate others.”
  • In a discussion about villains in movies, someone might say, “Malefic is one of the most iconic Disney villains.”
  • A person describing a toxic relationship might say, “Her ex-boyfriend was malefic and emotionally abusive.”

22. Maleficence

Maleficence refers to the act of doing harm or causing evil. It is often used in the context of someone intentionally causing harm to others.

  • For instance, in a discussion about medical ethics, someone might say, “The doctor’s maleficence in prescribing unnecessary medication led to serious health complications for the patient.”
  • A person discussing criminal behavior might say, “Theft and assault are clear examples of maleficence.”
  • In a debate about corporate responsibility, someone might argue, “The company’s maleficence in polluting the environment cannot be ignored.”

23. Corrupter

A corrupter is someone who influences others to engage in unethical or immoral behavior. It is often used to describe someone who leads others astray or encourages them to do wrong.

  • For example, in a discussion about the negative impact of peer pressure, someone might say, “He was a corrupter who convinced others to skip school and engage in risky behavior.”
  • A person describing a toxic friendship might say, “She was a corrupter who constantly encouraged me to make poor choices.”
  • In a debate about the role of media in society, someone might argue, “Reality TV shows can act as corrupters by promoting negative behavior and values.”

24. Rotten Apple

A rotten apple is a term used to describe someone who has a negative influence on others or who is a bad influence in general. It is often used to refer to someone who leads others astray or who encourages them to engage in harmful behavior.

  • For instance, in a discussion about a troubled student in school, someone might say, “He’s a rotten apple who disrupts the class and influences others to misbehave.”
  • A person describing a toxic workplace might say, “There’s always a rotten apple in every team who brings down morale.”
  • In a conversation about parenting, someone might say, “It’s important to monitor your child’s friends to ensure they don’t fall in with a rotten apple.”

25. Negative Nancy

Negative Nancy is a term used to describe someone who is consistently negative or pessimistic. It is often used to refer to someone who always sees the downside of things and brings down the mood of those around them.

  • For example, in a discussion about a coworker who constantly complains, someone might say, “She’s such a negative Nancy. She never has anything positive to say.”
  • A person describing a friend who always focuses on the negatives might say, “I love her, but she can be a real negative Nancy sometimes.”
  • In a conversation about maintaining a positive mindset, someone might advise, “Try to distance yourself from negative Nancies who bring you down.”

26. Bad Influence

This term refers to someone who has a negative impact on others, often leading them astray or encouraging them to engage in harmful behavior.

  • For example, a concerned parent might say, “I don’t want my child hanging out with that bad influence.”
  • In a group of friends, someone might warn, “Stay away from him, he’s a bad influence.”
  • A teacher might comment, “It’s important to surround yourself with positive influences and avoid the bad ones.”

27. Troublemaker

This slang term refers to someone who causes trouble or creates problems, often intentionally.

  • For instance, a teacher might say, “That student is always causing disruptions, he’s a real troublemaker.”
  • In a group of friends, someone might joke, “Watch out, here comes the troublemaker.”
  • A parent might express concern, “I don’t want my child hanging out with those troublemakers.”

28. Rebel

A rebel is someone who resists or defies authority, rules, or social norms. They often challenge the status quo and express their individuality.

  • For example, a teenager might say, “I’m a rebel, I don’t follow the rules.”
  • In a discussion about counterculture movements, someone might mention, “The rebels of the 1960s challenged societal norms.”
  • A person might admire a rebel and say, “She’s a true rebel, always standing up for what she believes in.”

29. Deviant

A deviant is someone who behaves in a way that deviates from societal norms or expectations. They often engage in unconventional or unconventional behavior.

  • For instance, a psychologist might describe someone as a deviant if they consistently engage in morally questionable actions.
  • In a discussion about social norms, someone might comment, “Deviant behavior can challenge our understanding of what is ‘normal’.”
  • A person might express disapproval and say, “I don’t want to associate with deviants.”

30. Outlaw

An outlaw is someone who has been declared an outlaw by the legal system or society. They are often engaged in illegal activities or have violated laws.

  • For example, in the Wild West, outlaws were notorious for their criminal activities.
  • In a discussion about organized crime, someone might mention, “The mafia is made up of outlaws.”
  • A person might use the term figuratively and say, “He’s an outlaw, always breaking the rules and pushing boundaries.”

31. Mischief-maker

This term refers to someone who frequently causes mischief or trouble. It can be used to describe someone who enjoys playing pranks or engaging in mischievous behavior.

  • For example, “He’s always pulling pranks and causing trouble. He’s a real mischief-maker.”
  • A teacher might say, “I need to keep an eye on the mischief-makers in the class.”
  • In a group of friends, someone might jokingly say, “Watch out for him, he’s the resident mischief-maker.”

32. Scallywag

This term is used to describe a person, often in an endearing or playful way, who is mischievous or behaves in a cheeky manner.

  • For instance, “He’s such a scallywag. He’s always up to something.”
  • A parent might affectionately say to their child, “You little scallywag, what trouble have you gotten into now?”
  • In a playful conversation, someone might say, “I love hanging out with scallywags like you. You always know how to have fun.”

33. Inciter

This term refers to someone who intentionally stirs up or provokes others, often to create conflict or chaos.

  • For example, “He’s always inciting arguments and causing drama.”
  • A journalist might describe someone as an inciter if they frequently write controversial articles.
  • In a political discussion, someone might accuse another person of being an inciter if they make inflammatory statements.
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34. Influence-peddler

This term is used to describe someone who uses their influence or power to manipulate or control others for personal gain.

  • For instance, “He’s a notorious influence-peddler, always trying to get people to do things for him.”
  • In a discussion about politics, someone might accuse a politician of being an influence-peddler if they engage in corrupt practices.
  • A person might warn others, “Be careful around influence-peddlers. They’ll use you for their own benefit.”

35. Wrongdoer

This term refers to someone who engages in wrongful or illegal behavior. It can be used to describe someone who has committed a crime or who consistently behaves inappropriately.

  • For example, “The wrongdoer was arrested and charged with theft.”
  • A teacher might say, “I won’t tolerate any wrongdoers in my classroom.”
  • In a discussion about ethics, someone might argue, “Wrongdoers should be held accountable for their actions.”

36. Sinister

This word is used to describe something or someone that is evil, threatening, or malicious in nature. It often implies a hidden or secretive agenda.

  • For example, “The movie’s villain had a sinister plan to take over the world.”
  • In a discussion about a suspicious character, someone might say, “There’s something sinister about him.”
  • A person describing a haunted house might say, “The atmosphere was eerie and sinister.”

37. Depraved

This word is used to describe someone who is morally corrupt or wicked, often engaging in immoral or unethical behavior.

  • For instance, “The serial killer’s depraved actions shocked the community.”
  • In a discussion about a corrupt leader, someone might say, “His depraved actions have caused immense suffering.”
  • A person describing a disturbing movie might say, “The film explores the depraved depths of human nature.”

38. Wicked

This word has a dual meaning. It can refer to something or someone evil, cruel, or immoral. It can also be used to describe something cool, impressive, or extraordinary.

  • For example, “The wicked witch cast a spell on the protagonist.”
  • In a discussion about a thrilling roller coaster, someone might say, “That drop was wicked!”
  • A person describing a talented musician might say, “He played a wicked guitar solo.”

39. Immoral

This word is used to describe behavior that goes against accepted moral principles or standards. It implies a lack of moral values or principles.

  • For instance, “Stealing is considered immoral in most societies.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial decision, someone might say, “Many people view his actions as immoral.”
  • A person describing a corrupt business practice might say, “The company’s immoral actions led to its downfall.”

40. Unscrupulous

This word is used to describe someone who lacks moral principles or ethics, often engaging in dishonest or unethical behavior.

  • For example, “The unscrupulous salesman tricked customers into buying faulty products.”
  • In a discussion about a corrupt politician, someone might say, “His unscrupulous actions have eroded public trust.”
  • A person describing a shady business practice might say, “The company’s unscrupulous tactics led to its success, but at the expense of others.”

41. Devious

This term refers to someone who is sneaky, crafty, and cunning in their actions or behavior. It often implies a sense of deceit or underhandedness.

  • For example, “She came up with a devious plan to get back at her ex.”
  • In a discussion about a clever strategy, someone might say, “That’s a devious way to outsmart the competition.”
  • A person might describe a manipulative individual as, “He’s always coming up with devious schemes to get what he wants.”

42. Schemer

A schemer is someone who devises a plan or strategy, often with a hidden agenda or ulterior motive. It suggests a person who is cunning and manipulative in their actions.

  • For instance, “She’s always scheming to get ahead in her career.”
  • In a discussion about a complicated plot, someone might say, “The schemer behind the scheme had thought of every possible outcome.”
  • A person might warn others about a manipulative individual by saying, “Watch out for him, he’s a schemer who’s always plotting something.”

43. Manipulator

A manipulator is someone who influences or controls others through deceptive or cunning tactics. They use psychological tactics to get what they want or to manipulate situations to their advantage.

  • For example, “She’s a skilled manipulator who knows how to play people.”
  • In a discussion about toxic relationships, someone might say, “He was a master manipulator who knew exactly how to control his partner.”
  • A person might warn others about a manipulative individual by saying, “Don’t let him manipulate you, he’s a skilled controller.”

44. Charlatan

A charlatan is someone who pretends to have knowledge or skills they do not possess. They often deceive others for personal gain or to appear more knowledgeable or capable than they actually are.

  • For instance, “He claimed to be a doctor, but he was just a charlatan.”
  • In a discussion about scams, someone might say, “Beware of charlatans offering quick fixes or miracle cures.”
  • A person might describe someone who is dishonest and deceitful as, “He’s a charlatan who preys on people’s trust.”

45. Trickster

A trickster is someone who enjoys playing tricks or pranks on others. They often use their wit and cunning to deceive or outsmart others for their own amusement.

  • For example, “He’s always pulling pranks and being a trickster.”
  • In a discussion about mischievous characters, someone might say, “The trickster in the story always found a way to outsmart everyone else.”
  • A person might describe someone who enjoys playing tricks as, “He’s a natural trickster who loves to keep people on their toes.”