Top 65 Slang For Be-Able-To – Meaning & Usage

In today’s fast-paced world, being able to express ourselves accurately and efficiently is more important than ever. That’s why we’ve put together a list of top slang phrases for “be-able-to” that will help you navigate conversations with ease. From trendy expressions to the latest buzzwords, we’ve got you covered. So, get ready to level up your vocabulary and master the art of being able to communicate like a pro!

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1. Can do

This phrase is used to indicate that someone is capable of doing something or is willing to do it. It implies a positive and confident attitude towards accomplishing a task.

  • For example, if someone asks for help, you can respond with “Sure, I can do that for you.”
  • In a job interview, a candidate might say, “I have a can-do attitude and I’m always ready to take on new challenges.”
  • A coach might motivate their team by saying, “Believe in yourselves, you can do anything you set your minds to.”

2. Capable of

This phrase is straightforward and indicates that someone has the necessary skills or qualities to accomplish a specific task or goal.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Are you capable of fixing this?” you can respond with “Yes, I am capable of fixing it.”
  • In a performance review, a manager might say, “John has shown that he is capable of handling complex projects.”
  • A teacher might encourage their students by saying, “You are all capable of achieving great things if you put in the effort.”

3. Have the knack for

This phrase suggests that someone has a natural ability or talent for doing something. It implies that they possess an intuitive understanding or aptitude for a particular task.

  • For example, if someone is good at playing an instrument, you can say, “They have the knack for music.”
  • In a conversation about cooking, someone might say, “She has the knack for creating delicious recipes.”
  • A friend might compliment you by saying, “You have the knack for making people feel comfortable in social situations.”

4. Got what it takes

This phrase indicates that someone possesses the qualities or abilities required to achieve success in a particular endeavor. It implies confidence in their capabilities.

  • For instance, if someone is applying for a challenging job, they might say, “I believe I’ve got what it takes to excel in this role.”
  • In a sports competition, a coach might say to their team, “You’ve trained hard and now you’ve got what it takes to win.”
  • A mentor might encourage their mentee by saying, “Don’t doubt yourself, you’ve got what it takes to achieve your goals.”

5. Have the chops

This phrase is often used in reference to someone’s musical or performance abilities, suggesting that they have the necessary skills or talent to excel in their field.

  • For example, if someone is a skilled guitarist, you can say, “They have the chops to play any genre of music.”
  • In a discussion about acting, someone might say, “She definitely has the chops to become a successful actress.”
  • A music critic might write, “The band’s lead vocalist has the vocal chops to deliver powerful performances.”

6. Be able to manage

This phrase means to have the capability or skills to handle or deal with a situation or task. It implies being able to take control and successfully navigate through challenges or responsibilities.

  • For example, a manager might say, “I trust my team to be able to manage any unexpected issues that arise.”
  • In a job interview, a candidate might mention, “I have experience in project management and can easily manage multiple tasks at once.”
  • A friend might ask, “Do you think you’ll be able to manage the workload for this semester?”

7. Be able to cope with

To cope with something means to effectively deal with or manage a difficult or challenging situation. It suggests being able to handle stress, emotions, or adversity in a healthy and productive manner.

  • For instance, a therapist might advise, “It’s important to develop healthy coping mechanisms to be able to cope with everyday stress.”
  • During a therapy session, a client might say, “I’m struggling to cope with the loss of a loved one.”
  • A friend might ask, “How do you cope with the pressures of work?”

8. Be able to deal with

This phrase means to have the ability or skills to handle or manage a situation or problem. It implies being capable of effectively addressing and resolving issues or challenges.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “I need to be able to deal with different learning styles in my classroom.”
  • In a conflict resolution workshop, participants might practice saying, “I understand your concerns, and I’m confident we can find a way to deal with this issue.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you deal with the logistics of planning the party?”

9. Be able to handle

To handle something means to have the ability or capacity to deal with it in a competent and effective manner. It suggests being capable of taking control and successfully managing a task or situation.

  • For instance, a mechanic might say, “I can handle any car repair you throw at me.”
  • In a team meeting, a leader might assign tasks by saying, “Can you handle coordinating the logistics for the event?”
  • A friend might ask, “Do you think you can handle the pressure of the upcoming competition?”

10. Be able to tackle

To tackle something means to take on or approach it with determination and effort. It implies being able to confront and address a task or challenge with resolve and enthusiasm.

  • For example, a coach might motivate their team by saying, “Let’s tackle this game head-on and give it our all.”
  • In a job interview, a candidate might mention, “I have experience tackling complex problems and finding innovative solutions.”
  • A friend might ask, “Are you ready to tackle the hiking trail this weekend?”

11. Be able to master

To fully understand and excel at a particular skill or subject. “Nail it” is a slang term used to describe the act of mastering something.

  • For example, a student might say, “I finally nailed calculus after months of studying.”
  • A musician might exclaim, “I nailed that guitar solo during the performance!”
  • A chef might proudly announce, “I nailed the recipe for this dish, it’s perfect!”

12. Be able to conquer

To successfully overcome a challenge or obstacle. “Crush it” is a slang term used to describe the act of conquering something.

  • For instance, an athlete might say, “I crushed my personal record in the marathon.”
  • A student might declare, “I’m going to crush this exam and get an A!”
  • A salesperson might boast, “I crushed my sales target for the month, exceeding expectations.”

13. Be able to overcome

To successfully overcome difficulties or obstacles. “Rise above” is a slang term used to describe the act of overcoming something.

  • For example, a person might say, “I rose above my fear of public speaking and delivered a great presentation.”
  • Someone facing a challenging situation might say, “I’m determined to rise above this and come out stronger.”
  • A motivational speaker might inspire others by saying, “You have the power to rise above any adversity and achieve your goals.”

14. Be able to achieve

To successfully accomplish or attain a goal or desired outcome. “Get it done” is a slang term used to describe the act of achieving something.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I worked hard and got it done, despite the obstacles.”
  • A student might motivate themselves by saying, “I need to buckle down and get it done to pass this test.”
  • A manager might encourage their team by saying, “Let’s work together and get it done before the deadline.”

15. Be able to succeed

To achieve great success or perform exceptionally well. “Kill it” is a slang term used to describe the act of succeeding.

  • For example, a performer might say, “I killed it on stage tonight, the audience loved it.”
  • A businessperson might say, “I have a great feeling about this new project, we’re going to kill it.”
  • A student might say, “I studied hard and killed my final exams, I’m ready for summer break!”

16. Can-do

This term refers to someone who is capable and willing to complete a task or achieve a goal. It implies a positive attitude and a willingness to take on challenges.

  • For example, a manager might say, “We need someone with a can-do attitude for this project.”
  • A person might describe themselves as “a can-do kind of person” when asked about their work ethic.
  • Someone might compliment a coworker by saying, “She always has a can-do attitude and gets things done.”

17. Capable

This word describes someone who has the necessary skills or qualities to accomplish a task or meet a certain standard. It implies competence and reliability.

  • For instance, a job posting might state, “Looking for a capable candidate with strong communication skills.”
  • A person might say, “I believe I am capable of handling this responsibility.”
  • A coworker might compliment someone by saying, “You’re a capable problem solver.”

18. Competent

This term describes someone who has the necessary knowledge and skill to perform a task effectively. It implies a level of expertise and proficiency.

  • For example, a manager might say, “We need a competent team to handle this project.”
  • A person might say, “I feel competent in my ability to complete this task.”
  • A coworker might praise someone by saying, “She’s a competent professional who always delivers quality work.”

19. Skilled

This word describes someone who has acquired a high level of proficiency or expertise in a specific skill or field. It implies a mastery of the subject.

  • For instance, a job posting might state, “Looking for a skilled programmer with experience in multiple programming languages.”
  • A person might say, “I have become skilled in using graphic design software through years of practice.”
  • A coworker might acknowledge someone’s talent by saying, “You’re a skilled negotiator.”

20. Proficient

This term describes someone who has a high level of skill or competence in a specific area. It implies a thorough understanding and ability to perform tasks with ease.

  • For example, a job posting might state, “Seeking a proficient writer with excellent grammar and communication skills.”
  • A person might say, “I am proficient in multiple programming languages.”
  • A coworker might compliment someone by saying, “You’re a proficient problem solver.”

21. Able-bodied

This term refers to someone who is physically fit and capable of performing tasks or activities. It implies strength and agility.

  • For example, “He’s an able-bodied athlete who excels in multiple sports.”
  • In a discussion about physical labor, someone might say, “We need a team of able-bodied workers to complete this project.”
  • Another might comment, “Being able-bodied doesn’t guarantee success, but it does provide an advantage in certain situations.”

22. Handy

This slang term describes someone who is skilled or adept at performing practical tasks or using their hands to fix or create things.

  • For instance, “She’s really handy with tools and can fix almost anything.”
  • In a conversation about home improvement, someone might say, “I wish I were more handy and could tackle these repairs myself.”
  • Another might comment, “Being handy around the house can save you a lot of money on repairs.”

23. Talented

This term describes someone who has a natural aptitude or skill in a particular area. It implies exceptional ability or talent.

  • For example, “She’s a talented musician who can play multiple instruments.”
  • In a discussion about sports, someone might say, “He’s a talented athlete with incredible speed and agility.”
  • Another might comment, “Being talented in a specific field often requires years of practice and dedication.”

24. Gifted

This slang term describes someone who has innate or natural abilities or talents in a particular area. It implies exceptional skill or talent that comes effortlessly.

  • For instance, “He’s a gifted artist who can create stunning artwork without much effort.”
  • In a conversation about academics, someone might say, “She’s a gifted student who excels in every subject.”
  • Another might comment, “Being gifted doesn’t mean you don’t have to work hard, but it does give you a head start in certain areas.”

25. Apt

This term describes someone who is quick to learn or understand something. It implies an ability to grasp concepts or skills easily.

  • For example, “He’s an apt student who always picks up new material quickly.”
  • In a discussion about language learning, someone might say, “Children are often more apt at picking up new languages than adults.”
  • Another might comment, “Being apt at learning new skills can open up many opportunities for personal and professional growth.”

26. Adroit

This word describes someone who is highly skilled or proficient in a particular area. It implies a high level of competence and ability.

  • For example, “She is adroit at playing the piano.”
  • A sports commentator might say, “His adroit footwork allowed him to score the winning goal.”
  • In a job interview, a candidate might mention, “I am adroit at problem-solving and critical thinking.”

27. Accomplished

This word refers to someone who has successfully achieved or completed something. It suggests that the person has a wide range of skills and accomplishments.

  • For instance, “She is an accomplished pianist.”
  • A proud parent might say, “My son is an accomplished athlete.”
  • A colleague might describe someone as, “He is an accomplished writer and researcher.”

28. Versatile

This word describes someone who is able to adapt and perform well in various situations or with different skills. It implies flexibility and the ability to handle different tasks.

  • For example, “She is a versatile actress who can play both comedic and dramatic roles.”
  • A job posting might require candidates to be “versatile in handling multiple projects.”
  • A friend might say, “He is a versatile cook who can prepare a wide range of cuisines.”

29. Resourceful

This word refers to someone who is able to find creative solutions to problems or challenges. It implies the ability to make the most of available resources.

  • For instance, “She is a resourceful entrepreneur who always finds innovative ways to grow her business.”
  • A teacher might say, “I encourage my students to be resourceful and think outside the box.”
  • In a survival situation, someone might be described as, “He is resourceful and can find food and shelter in any environment.”

30. Savvy

This word describes someone who is knowledgeable and well-informed, particularly in a specific area. It suggests a combination of practical wisdom, experience, and understanding.

  • For example, “She is tech-savvy and always up-to-date with the latest gadgets.”
  • A businessperson might say, “He is financially savvy and knows how to make smart investments.”
  • A traveler might describe someone as, “She is savvy when it comes to navigating new cities and finding the best local spots.”

31. Sharp

This term is often used to describe someone who is quick-witted, intelligent, or skilled in a particular area. It can also refer to someone who is physically adept or has good reflexes.

  • For example, “He’s a sharp shooter with a rifle.”
  • Someone might say, “She’s sharp with numbers and can calculate complex equations in her head.”
  • In a sports context, a commentator might say, “He’s sharp on the basketball court, making quick passes and sinking shots.”

32. Handy with

This phrase is used to describe someone who is proficient or skilled at using a particular tool, object, or skill.

  • For instance, “He’s handy with a wrench and can fix just about anything.”
  • Someone might say, “She’s handy with a paintbrush and can create beautiful artwork.”
  • In a conversation about cooking, one might say, “He’s handy with a knife and can chop vegetables with precision.”

33. Quick on the uptake

This phrase refers to someone who is able to grasp or comprehend something quickly. It implies that the person is sharp-minded and can easily understand new concepts or ideas.

  • For example, “She’s quick on the uptake and can solve complex puzzles in no time.”
  • One might say, “He’s quick on the uptake when it comes to learning new languages.”
  • In a work setting, a colleague might comment, “He’s quick on the uptake and always understands instructions on the first try.”

34. Agile

This term is used to describe someone who is nimble, flexible, and able to move quickly and easily. It can refer to physical agility as well as mental or intellectual agility.

  • For instance, “She’s agile on the dance floor and can perform intricate moves.”
  • Someone might say, “He’s mentally agile and can come up with creative solutions to problems.”
  • In a sports context, a commentator might say, “He’s agile on the soccer field, dodging opponents with ease.”

35. Dextrous

This word describes someone who is skillful or adept at using their hands, particularly in performing tasks that require precision or coordination.

  • For example, “He’s dextrous with a paintbrush and can create detailed artwork.”
  • Someone might say, “She’s dextrous with a musical instrument and can play complex melodies.”
  • In a conversation about cooking, one might say, “He’s dextrous in the kitchen and can chop vegetables with speed and accuracy.”

36. Skilled with

This phrase is used to describe someone who is highly competent or talented in a particular skill or area. It emphasizes the person’s expertise or mastery.

  • For example, “He is skilled with a guitar and can play any song by ear.”
  • In a job interview, a candidate might say, “I am skilled with computer programming languages.”
  • A coach might praise a player by saying, “She is skilled with a basketball and has excellent shooting accuracy.”

37. Resourceful in

This phrase describes someone who is adept at finding creative or innovative solutions to problems. It emphasizes the person’s ability to think outside the box and use available resources effectively.

  • For instance, “He is resourceful in finding ways to save money.”
  • In a survival situation, someone might be described as “resourceful in finding food and shelter.”
  • A manager might compliment an employee by saying, “She is resourceful in coming up with new marketing strategies.”

38. Savvy in

This phrase refers to someone who is well-informed or knowledgeable about a particular subject or field. It emphasizes the person’s understanding and expertise.

  • For example, “He is savvy in the world of finance and can give great investment advice.”
  • In a technology discussion, someone might say, “She is savvy in the latest trends and developments.”
  • A travel enthusiast might be described as “savvy in finding the best deals and hidden gems.”
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39. Sharp at

This phrase describes someone who is quick and accurate in a particular skill or activity. It emphasizes the person’s precision and efficiency.

  • For instance, “He is sharp at solving math problems in his head.”
  • In a competitive sport, a player might be described as “sharp at making split-second decisions.”
  • A chef might compliment a cook by saying, “She is sharp at chopping vegetables with precision.”

40. Agile in

This phrase refers to someone who is nimble and quick in their movements or actions. It emphasizes the person’s ability to move with ease and adaptability.

  • For example, “He is agile in navigating through crowded spaces.”
  • In a dance performance, a dancer might be described as “agile in executing complex moves.”
  • An athlete might be praised for being “agile in changing directions and evading opponents.”

41. Dextrous in

To be skilled or proficient in a particular activity or skill. “Dextrous in” is a slang term used to describe someone who is highly skilled or talented in a specific area.

  • For example, a person might say, “He’s dextrous in playing the piano, he can play any song by ear.”
  • In a conversation about sports, someone might comment, “She’s dextrous in basketball, her ball-handling skills are impressive.”
  • A friend might compliment another by saying, “You’re dextrous in cooking, your dishes always turn out delicious.”

42. Competent with

To be capable or skilled in a particular activity or skill. “Competent with” is a slang term used to describe someone who has the necessary skills or abilities to perform a task or activity.

  • For instance, a person might say, “He’s competent with computers, he can fix any technical issue.”
  • In a work setting, a colleague might comment, “She’s competent with project management, she always delivers high-quality results.”
  • A teacher might praise a student by saying, “You’re competent with math, you always understand complex concepts quickly.”

43. Proficient with

To be skilled or adept in a particular activity or skill. “Proficient with” is a slang term used to describe someone who has a high level of skill or expertise in a specific area.

  • For example, a person might say, “She’s proficient with languages, she can speak five different ones fluently.”
  • In a discussion about music, someone might comment, “He’s proficient with the guitar, he can play complex solos with ease.”
  • A coach might praise an athlete by saying, “You’re proficient with swimming, your technique is flawless.”

44. Skillful with

To be talented or skilled in a particular activity or skill. “Skillful with” is a slang term used to describe someone who has a natural talent or ability in a specific area.

  • For instance, a person might say, “He’s skillful with painting, his artwork is incredibly detailed.”
  • In a conversation about cooking, someone might comment, “She’s skillful with desserts, her cakes are always beautifully decorated.”
  • A friend might compliment another by saying, “You’re skillful with photography, your pictures always capture the perfect moment.”

45. Masterful with

To be exceptionally skilled or talented in a particular activity or skill. “Masterful with” is a slang term used to describe someone who has reached a high level of mastery or expertise in a specific area.

  • For example, a person might say, “He’s masterful with chess, he can beat anyone in just a few moves.”
  • In a discussion about writing, someone might comment, “She’s masterful with words, her stories are captivating.”
  • A mentor might praise a student by saying, “You’re masterful with public speaking, your presentations are always engaging.”

46. Got the chops

This phrase is often used to describe someone who has the necessary skills or talent to do something.

  • For example, “He’s got the chops to be a professional musician.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve got the chops to handle this project on my own.”
  • In a discussion about cooking, someone might comment, “She’s got the chops to be a top chef.”

47. Got the skills

This phrase indicates that someone possesses the necessary skills or abilities to accomplish a task.

  • For instance, “He’s got the skills to be a successful athlete.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve got the skills to solve this problem.”
  • In a conversation about coding, someone might comment, “She’s got the skills to develop complex software.”

48. Have the knack

This phrase suggests that someone has a natural talent or ability for a particular task or skill.

  • For example, “He has the knack for making people laugh.”
  • A person might say, “I have the knack for finding the best deals.”
  • In a discussion about painting, someone might comment, “She has the knack for capturing emotions on canvas.”

49. Got the ability

This phrase implies that someone is capable or competent in a certain area or skill.

  • For instance, “He’s got the ability to solve complex mathematical problems.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve got the ability to handle stressful situations.”
  • In a conversation about singing, someone might comment, “She’s got the ability to hit high notes effortlessly.”

50. Have the talent

This phrase indicates that someone possesses a natural skill or gift in a particular area.

  • For example, “He has the talent for playing the piano.”
  • A person might say, “I have the talent for writing captivating stories.”
  • In a discussion about dancing, someone might comment, “She has the talent to mesmerize the audience with her moves.”

51. Got the power

This phrase is often used to convey the idea of having the necessary ability or strength to accomplish a task or overcome an obstacle.

  • For example, “I got the power to finish this project on time.”
  • Another usage might be, “She’s got the power to lift heavy weights.”
  • In a motivational context, someone might say, “You’ve got the power to achieve your dreams.”

52. Have the capacity

This phrase suggests that someone has the necessary capacity or potential to perform a certain action or task.

  • For instance, “I have the capacity to learn multiple languages.”
  • Another example could be, “He has the capacity to handle stressful situations.”
  • A teacher might say to a student, “You have the capacity to excel in this subject.”

53. Got the know-how

This phrase implies that someone possesses the necessary knowledge and skills to successfully perform a specific task or activity.

  • For example, “I’ve got the know-how to fix this car.”
  • Another usage could be, “She’s got the know-how to bake delicious desserts.”
  • In a professional setting, someone might say, “He’s got the know-how to lead the team.”

54. Have the expertise

This phrase indicates that someone has acquired extensive knowledge and skills in a specific area or field.

  • For instance, “She has the expertise to handle complex legal cases.”
  • Another example could be, “He has the expertise to design innovative software.”
  • A consultant might say, “I have the expertise to help businesses improve their operations.”

55. Got the capability

This phrase suggests that someone possesses the necessary ability or potential to perform a certain action or task.

  • For example, “I’ve got the capability to solve complex mathematical problems.”
  • Another usage might be, “He’s got the capability to adapt to new environments.”
  • In a technological context, someone might say, “They’ve got the capability to develop advanced software.”

56. Have the ability

This phrase is used to describe someone who is capable of doing something or has the skill or talent to do it.

  • For example, “I have the ability to speak multiple languages.”
  • Someone might say, “She has the ability to solve complex math problems.”
  • In a job interview, a candidate might highlight their abilities by saying, “I have the ability to work well under pressure.”

57. Got the talent

This slang phrase is used to describe someone who possesses a natural skill or aptitude for something.

  • For instance, “He’s got the talent for playing the piano.”
  • A coach might say, “She’s got the talent to become a professional athlete.”
  • In a talent competition, a judge might comment, “You’ve got the talent to go far in this industry.”

58. Have the power

This phrase is used to describe someone who has the ability or authority to do something.

  • For example, “I have the power to make decisions in this company.”
  • A parent might say, “I have the power to ground you if you misbehave.”
  • In a political context, a leader might assert, “I have the power to enact change in this country.”

59. Got the capacity

This slang phrase is used to describe someone who has the mental or physical ability to do something.

  • For instance, “He’s got the capacity to handle stressful situations.”
  • A teacher might say, “She’s got the capacity to learn quickly.”
  • In a team project, a member might comment, “We’ve got the capacity to finish this on time.”

60. Have the know-how

This phrase is used to describe someone who has the knowledge and skills to do something.

  • For example, “I have the know-how to fix a car.”
  • A chef might say, “He has the know-how to create delicious dishes.”
  • In a technology-related discussion, someone might comment, “She has the know-how to troubleshoot computer issues.”

61. Got the knack

When someone “has the knack” for something, it means they possess a natural talent or ability to do it. This phrase is often used to describe someone who is exceptionally skilled or adept at a particular task or activity.

  • For example, “She’s got the knack for playing the piano. It’s like music flows through her fingertips.”
  • In a conversation about cooking, someone might say, “I don’t have the knack for baking, but I can whip up a mean stir-fry.”
  • A friend might compliment your problem-solving skills by saying, “You’ve got the knack for finding creative solutions.”

62. Got the skill

When someone “has the skill,” it means they possess the ability or expertise in a particular area. This phrase is often used to describe someone who is proficient or knowledgeable in a specific skill or activity.

  • For instance, “He’s got the skill to fix anything. Give him a broken gadget, and he’ll have it working in no time.”
  • In a discussion about sports, someone might say, “She’s got the skill to score goals from any angle.”
  • A coworker might acknowledge your programming abilities by saying, “You’ve got the skill to write efficient and bug-free code.”

63. Have the capability

When someone “has the capability,” it means they have the capacity or potential to do something. This phrase is often used to describe someone who possesses the necessary qualities or resources to accomplish a task or achieve a goal.

  • For example, “She has the capability to lead the team to success. Her strong leadership skills and strategic thinking make her an excellent candidate.”
  • In a conversation about technology, someone might say, “This smartphone has the capability to capture stunning photos and videos.”
  • A manager might recognize an employee’s potential by saying, “You have the capability to take on more responsibilities and grow within the company.”

64. Got the expertise

When someone “has the expertise,” it means they have specialized knowledge or skill in a particular field. This phrase is often used to describe someone who is highly knowledgeable or experienced in a specific subject or area.

  • For instance, “He’s got the expertise in cybersecurity. His extensive knowledge and years of experience make him a sought-after consultant.”
  • In a discussion about medicine, someone might say, “She’s got the expertise to diagnose rare diseases. Her diagnostic skills are unmatched.”
  • A colleague might acknowledge your marketing knowledge by saying, “You’ve got the expertise to develop effective marketing strategies.”

65. Got the proficiency

When someone “has the proficiency,” it means they have a high level of skill or competence in a particular area. This phrase is often used to describe someone who is exceptionally skilled or accomplished in a specific task or activity.

  • For example, “He’s got the proficiency in playing the guitar. His fingerpicking technique is flawless.”
  • In a conversation about language learning, someone might say, “She’s got the proficiency to speak multiple languages fluently.”
  • A teacher might compliment a student’s writing skills by saying, “You’ve got the proficiency to write compelling and well-structured essays.”