Top 77 Slang For Because – Meaning & Usage

Because is a common word in the English language, but did you know there are numerous slang terms that can be used in its place? Whether you want to sound cool or simply switch up your vocabulary, we’ve got you covered. In this listicle, we’ll introduce you to the top slang words for “because” that are currently trending. Get ready to expand your linguistic horizons and add some flair to your conversations!

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2. ‘Cos

Another shortened form of the word “because.” It is often used in casual conversation or informal writing to provide a reason or explanation for something.

  • For instance, “I didn’t go to the concert ‘cos I couldn’t get tickets.”
  • A person might say, “I’m not going out tonight ‘cos I’m feeling tired.”
  • In a message to a friend, someone might write, “I can’t come over ‘cos I have to study for an exam.”

3. Cuz

An informal abbreviation of the word “because.” It is commonly used in casual conversations or text messages to express the reason or cause of something.

  • For example, “I’m not going to the party cuz I have other plans.”
  • A person might say, “I didn’t call you back cuz I was busy.”
  • In a text conversation, someone might write, “I can’t go shopping with you cuz I’m broke.”

4. Coz

A shortened form of the word “because.” It is often used in informal speech or writing to indicate the reason or cause of something.

  • For instance, “I can’t go to the movies coz I have to study.”
  • A person might say, “I didn’t eat dinner coz I wasn’t hungry.”
  • In a chat message, someone might write, “Can’t meet up tonight coz I’m feeling sick.”

5. Bc

An abbreviation of the word “because.” It is commonly used in casual writing, such as text messages or online chats, to provide a reason or explanation for something.

  • For example, “I couldn’t come to the party bc I had a family event.”
  • A person might say, “I’m not going to the gym today bc I’m feeling tired.”
  • In a message to a friend, someone might write, “Can’t make it to the movie bc I have to work late.”

6. B/c

This is a shorthand way of writing “because” and is commonly used in online communication, such as text messages or social media posts.

  • For example, “I couldn’t come to the party b/c I had to work.”
  • A person might say, “I’m running late b/c of traffic.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might ask, “Why did you do that b/c it doesn’t make sense?”

7. Bcz

Similar to “b/c,” “bcz” is another abbreviated form of “because” often used in casual online communication.

  • For instance, “I didn’t go to the concert bcz I didn’t have a ticket.”
  • A person might comment on a social media post saying, “I love this song bcz it reminds me of my childhood.”
  • In a text message, someone might explain, “I can’t make it tonight bcz I have a family gathering.”

8. Cuz of

This is a shortened version of “because of” and is commonly used in informal speech and writing.

  • For example, “I couldn’t go to the party cuz of a prior commitment.”
  • A person might say, “I’m tired cuz of the late-night studying.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might explain, “I can’t eat dairy cuz of my lactose intolerance.”

9. Cos of

Similar to “cuz of,” “cos of” is another shortened form of “because of” often used in informal contexts.

  • For instance, “I didn’t get the job cos of my lack of experience.”
  • A person might comment, “I’m feeling down cos of the rainy weather.”
  • In a text message, someone might say, “I won’t be able to make it cos of a family emergency.”

10. Cuzza

This is a slang variation of “because” and is commonly used in informal speech and writing.

  • For example, “I couldn’t go to the party cuzza my car broke down.”
  • A person might say, “I’m leaving early cuzza an early morning meeting.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might explain, “I can’t eat spicy food cuzza my sensitive stomach.”

11. Cozza

This is a slang term used as a substitute for “because”. It is often used in casual conversations or text messages.

  • For example, “I can’t come to the party cozza I have to work.”
  • In a text conversation, someone might say, “I’m tired cozza I didn’t get enough sleep.”
  • A person might explain, “I didn’t eat dinner cozza I wasn’t hungry.”

13. ‘Cos of

This is another shortened form of “because of”. It is often used in casual conversations or informal writing.

  • For example, “I couldn’t make it to the party ‘cos of a family emergency.”
  • In a text message, someone might say, “I’m not feeling well ‘cos of a cold.”
  • A person might explain, “I didn’t pass the test ‘cos of a lack of preparation.”

14. Bcuz

This is an abbreviation of “because”. It is commonly used in text messages or online chats.

  • For instance, “I couldn’t go to the movie bcuz I had to work.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “I’m tired bcuz I stayed up late.”
  • A person might explain, “I didn’t reply to your message bcuz I didn’t see it.”

15. Bcoz

This is another abbreviation of “because”. It is often used in informal writing or online communication.

  • For example, “I didn’t go to the party bcoz I had other plans.”
  • In a text conversation, someone might say, “I’m not attending the event bcoz I’m feeling sick.”
  • A person might explain, “I didn’t finish the project bcoz I ran out of time.”

16. Bcz of

A shortened form of “because of”. It is commonly used in informal writing or texting to express the reason or cause of something.

  • For example, “I couldn’t go to the party bcz of a family emergency.”
  • In a text conversation, someone might say, “I’m running late bcz of traffic.”
  • A social media post might read, “Can’t wait for the weekend bcz of the beach trip!”

17. B/c of

An abbreviation of “because of”. It is often used in casual writing or texting to indicate the reason or cause of something.

  • For instance, “I couldn’t attend the meeting b/c of a scheduling conflict.”
  • In a chat conversation, someone might say, “I’m feeling tired b/c of the late-night studying.”
  • A tweet might read, “I’m staying home tonight b/c of the rainy weather.”

18. Bcoz of

A shortened form of “because of”. It is commonly used in informal writing or texting to denote the reason or cause of something.

  • For example, “I couldn’t make it to the party bcoz of work.”
  • In a messaging conversation, someone might say, “I’m feeling happy bcoz of the good news.”
  • A status update might read, “I’m staying in tonight bcoz of the cold weather.”

19. Bczza

A slang term that combines “because” and “of a”. It is often used in informal writing or texting to express the reason or cause of something in a quick and casual manner.

  • For instance, “I couldn’t go to the concert bczza bad headache.”
  • In a chat conversation, someone might say, “I’m skipping the gym bczza lack of motivation.”
  • A social media comment might read, “I’m binge-watching this show bczza rainy day.”

20. B/cza

A condensed form of “because of a”. It is commonly used in casual writing or texting to indicate the reason or cause of something in a concise manner.

  • For example, “I couldn’t finish the assignment b/cza computer crash.”
  • In a text conversation, someone might say, “I’m feeling down b/cza recent breakup.”
  • A tweet might read, “I’m craving pizza b/cza late-night snack.”

21. Bcozza

This is a slang term for “because” and is often used in casual conversations or online messaging.

  • For example, “I can’t go out tonight bcozza I have to work.”
  • A text message might say, “I’m running late bcozza traffic.”
  • In a chat conversation, someone might say, “I didn’t go to the party bcozza I wasn’t feeling well.”

22. B/czza

Similar to “bcozza,” this slang term is a shortened version of “because” and is commonly used in informal communication.

  • For instance, “I didn’t finish my homework b/czza I got distracted.”
  • A social media post might say, “Not going to the concert b/czza I can’t afford the tickets.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might explain, “I didn’t eat breakfast b/czza I woke up late.”

24. ‘Cosza

Similar to “causeza,” this slang term combines the words “cos” and “za” to represent “because” in a more casual and abbreviated manner.

  • For instance, “I didn’t go to the game ‘cosza it was raining.”
  • A social media comment might say, “Not going to the party ‘cosza I have to study.”
  • In a chat conversation, someone might explain, “Didn’t see your message ‘cosza I was busy.”

26. ‘Cos ofza

This slang is a contraction of “because of that.” It is often used to explain a reason or cause for something.

  • For example, “I couldn’t go to the party ‘cos ofza my work schedule.”
  • In a conversation about a missed deadline, someone might say, “I didn’t finish the report ‘cos ofza the unexpected power outage.”
  • A person might explain their decision by saying, “I chose this college ‘cos ofza its strong engineering program.”

27. Bcuzza

This slang is a shortened form of “because of.” It is commonly used to provide a reason or justification for something.

  • For instance, “I couldn’t attend the meeting bcuzza my prior commitment.”
  • In a discussion about a failed project, one might say, “The project didn’t succeed bcuzza the lack of proper planning.”
  • A person might explain their absence by saying, “I couldn’t make it to the party bcuzza my car broke down.”

28. Bczza of

This slang is a contraction of “because of.” It is often used to indicate a cause or reason for something.

  • For example, “I couldn’t go to the concert bczza of my work schedule.”
  • In a conversation about a missed opportunity, someone might say, “I didn’t get the job bczza of my lack of experience.”
  • A person might explain their decision by saying, “I chose this restaurant bczza of its great reviews.”

29. Cos

This slang is a shortened form of “because.” It is commonly used to provide a reason or explanation for something.

  • For instance, “I couldn’t go to the party cos I was feeling sick.”
  • In a discussion about a disagreement, one might say, “We had an argument cos we had different opinions.”
  • A person might explain their actions by saying, “I did it cos I thought it was the right thing to do.”

31. ‘Cuz

This is a shortened version of the word “because” and is commonly used in informal speech or text messages.

  • For example, “I can’t go to the party ‘cuz I have to work.”
  • Someone might ask, “‘Cuz you said so?”
  • In a casual conversation, a person might say, “I didn’t do it ‘cuz I didn’t want to.”

33. ‘Cause it

This phrase is a contraction of “because” and is used to explain a situation or justify an action.

  • For example, “I didn’t eat the cake ’cause it was too sweet.”
  • In a conversation about preferences, someone might say, “‘Cause it’s my favorite.”
  • A person might explain, “I didn’t want to go to the party ’cause it was raining.”

35. ‘Cause they

This phrase is a contraction of “because” and is used to explain the actions or statements of a group of people.

  • For example, “The concert was canceled ’cause they had technical difficulties.”
  • In a conversation about motivations, someone might say, “‘Cause they wanted to help.”
  • A person might explain, “The store closed early ’cause they were short-staffed.”

37. ‘Cause he

This is a shortened form of “because” used in casual speech or informal writing. It is often used to explain or give a reason for something related to a male subject.

  • For instance, “He didn’t come to the game ’cause he had to work.”
  • In a discussion about someone’s behavior, one might say, “He got upset ’cause he misunderstood the situation.”
  • A person might explain a decision by saying, “He chose the blue shirt ’cause he thought it looked better.”

This is a shortened form of “because” used in casual speech or informal writing. It is often used to explain or give a reason for something related to a location or situation.

  • For instance, “I couldn’t find my keys ’cause there was a lot of clutter.”
  • In a discussion about a problem, someone might say, “The power went out ’cause there was a storm.”
  • A person might explain an outcome by saying, “The team lost ’cause there were too many mistakes.”

This phrase is a slang version of “because now” and is used to explain a current situation or action. It implies that the reason for something happening is happening at the present moment.

  • For example, “I can’t go out tonight ’cause now I have to study for my exam.”
  • A person might say, “‘Cause now I have a car, I can drive to work instead of taking the bus.”
  • In a conversation about changing plans, someone might say, “‘Cause now it’s raining, let’s stay in and watch a movie instead.”

43. ‘Cause of you

This phrase is a slang version of “because of you” and is used to attribute a cause or reason to someone. It implies that the reason for something happening is directly related to the actions or influence of a specific individual.

  • For example, “I’m late ’cause of you. You made me lose track of time.”
  • A person might say, “‘Cause of you, I discovered my passion for photography.”
  • In a conversation about a positive change, someone might say, “‘Cause of you, I started eating healthier and exercising regularly.”

This phrase is a slang version of “because of us” and is used to attribute a cause or reason to a specific group of people, including oneself. It implies that the reason for something happening is directly related to the actions or influence of a particular group that one belongs to.

  • For example, “We won the competition ’cause of us. We practiced really hard.”
  • A person might say, “‘Cause of us, the event was a success. We worked together as a team.”
  • In a conversation about a positive outcome, someone might say, “‘Cause of us, the project was completed ahead of schedule.”

47. ‘Cause of her

This phrase is a slang way of saying “because of her.” It is commonly used to attribute something to a specific person, usually a woman.

  • For instance, “He changed his mind ’cause of her persuasive arguments.”
  • In a discussion about a breakup, someone might say, “He’s been acting differently ’cause of her.”
  • A person might explain their decision by saying, “I chose this path ’cause of her influence.”

49. ‘Cause of then

This phrase is a slang way of saying “because of then.” It is commonly used to explain a sequence of events or attribute something to a specific time.

  • For instance, “We missed the train ’cause of then arriving late.”
  • In a conversation about a missed opportunity, someone might say, “I couldn’t attend the concert ’cause of then having other plans.”
  • A person might explain their decision by saying, “I chose this career path ’cause of then realizing my passion.”

51. ‘Cause for

This phrase is used to indicate the reason or cause for something.

  • For example, “I couldn’t sleep ’cause for the loud noises outside.”
  • In a discussion about a failed project, someone might say, “There were too many obstacles ’cause for its failure.”
  • A person explaining their decision might say, “I chose this path ’cause for the opportunities it offers.”

53. ‘Cause without

This phrase is used to indicate the reason or cause of something.

  • For example, “I couldn’t finish the project ’cause without the necessary resources.”
  • In a discussion about a failed experiment, someone might say, “The results were inconclusive ’cause without proper controls.”
  • A person explaining their decision might say, “I couldn’t accept the offer ’cause without considering other options.”

55. ‘Cause after

This phrase is used to explain the reason or cause of something that happened later.

  • For example, “I had to cancel the plans ’cause after I got sick.”
  • In a discussion about a change in strategy, someone might say, “We had to revise the plan ’cause after new information came to light.”
  • A person explaining their decision might say, “I changed my mind ’cause after I considered the potential consequences.”

56. as

This is a conjunction used to indicate the reason or cause of something. It can be used interchangeably with “because”.

  • For example, “I couldn’t go to the party as I had to work.”
  • A person might say, “I’m not going to the concert as I don’t like the band.”
  • In a discussion about a decision, someone might explain, “I chose the red dress as it matches my shoes.”

57. since

This is a conjunction used to indicate the reason or cause of something. It can be used interchangeably with “because”.

  • For instance, “I stayed home since I wasn’t feeling well.”
  • A person might say, “I don’t eat meat since I’m a vegetarian.”
  • In a conversation about a change, someone might explain, “I started exercising regularly since I wanted to improve my health.”

58. for

This is a preposition used to indicate the reason or cause of something. It can be used interchangeably with “because”.

  • For example, “I’m going to bed early for I have an early meeting tomorrow.”
  • A person might say, “I’m skipping dessert for I’m on a diet.”
  • In a discussion about a decision, someone might explain, “I chose the blue shirt for it matches my pants.”

59. on account of

This phrase is used to indicate the reason or cause of something. It can be used interchangeably with “because”.

  • For instance, “I couldn’t attend the party on account of my prior commitment.”
  • A person might say, “I’m not going to the beach on account of the bad weather.”
  • In a conversation about a cancellation, someone might explain, “The flight was delayed on account of the storm.”

60. due to

This phrase is used to indicate the reason or cause of something. It can be used interchangeably with “because of”.

  • For example, “The game was canceled due to the heavy rain.”
  • A person might say, “I couldn’t finish my assignment on time due to a family emergency.”
  • In a discussion about a delay, someone might explain, “The train was late due to technical issues.”

61. owing to

This phrase is used to indicate the cause or reason for something. It is often used in more formal or professional contexts.

  • For example, “The game was canceled owing to bad weather.”
  • In a business report, one might write, “The decline in sales is owing to changes in consumer behavior.”
  • A news article might state, “The event was postponed owing to logistical issues.”

62. thanks to

This phrase is used to express gratitude or appreciation for something that has led to a positive outcome or result.

  • For instance, “Thanks to the generous donations, we were able to provide food for the entire community.”
  • A person might say, “Thanks to my parents’ support, I was able to pursue my dream career.”
  • A team might celebrate a victory by saying, “Thanks to our hard work and dedication, we came out on top.”

63. by reason of

This phrase is used to indicate the cause or reason for something, often in a more formal or legal context.

  • For example, “The defendant was acquitted by reason of insanity.”
  • In a legal document, one might state, “The contract was terminated by reason of breach.”
  • A news article might report, “The flight was delayed by reason of mechanical issues.”

64. in view of

This phrase is used to introduce a reason or factor that should be taken into account when making a decision or judgment.

  • For instance, “In view of the recent developments, we have decided to change our strategy.”
  • A manager might say, “In view of your outstanding performance, we are promoting you to a higher position.”
  • A teacher might comment on a student’s behavior by saying, “In view of your disruptive actions, you will receive a detention.”

65. in light of

This phrase is used to introduce a reason or factor that should be considered when evaluating a situation or making a decision.

  • For example, “In light of the new evidence, the case will be reopened.”
  • A parent might say, “In light of your recent behavior, we need to have a serious conversation.”
  • A company might announce, “In light of the current economic climate, we have decided to implement cost-cutting measures.”

66. considering

This word is used to introduce a reason or explanation for something. It implies that the person has thought about the situation before making a decision or forming an opinion.

  • For example, “I bought the new phone considering its advanced features.”
  • A person might say, “Considering the weather forecast, we should bring an umbrella.”
  • In a discussion about career choices, someone might mention, “Considering my passion for art, I decided to pursue a degree in fine arts.”

67. given that

This phrase is used to introduce a reason or explanation based on a particular fact or circumstance. It suggests that the reason is valid or logical given the information provided.

  • For instance, “I couldn’t attend the party given that I had to work late.”
  • A person might say, “Given that it’s a holiday, we should expect heavy traffic.”
  • In a debate about climate change, someone might argue, “Given the scientific consensus, we need to take immediate action.”

68. seeing as

This phrase is used to introduce a reason or explanation based on a particular condition or circumstance. It implies that the reason is valid or expected given the situation.

  • For example, “I’ll leave early seeing as I have a doctor’s appointment.”
  • A person might say, “Seeing as it’s your birthday, I’ll treat you to dinner.”
  • In a discussion about travel plans, someone might suggest, “Seeing as we’re already in Europe, why not visit a few more countries?”

70. ‘Cause of the fact that

This phrase is used to introduce a reason or explanation based on a specific fact or circumstance. It emphasizes that the reason is directly caused by the given fact.

  • For example, “I couldn’t attend the meeting ’cause of the fact that I was sick.”
  • A person might say, “I won the game ’cause of the fact that I trained hard.”
  • In a discussion about rising prices, someone might argue, “Prices are increasing ’cause of the fact that demand exceeds supply.”

72. ‘Cause of the fact

This phrase is a shortened and more casual way of saying “because of the fact.” It is commonly used in informal speech or writing.

  • For instance, “He failed the test ’cause of the fact that he didn’t study.”
  • A person might explain, “‘Cause of the fact that it’s a holiday, the office is closed.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “I can’t go to the concert ’cause of the fact that I have a prior commitment.”

74. ‘Cause of the

This phrase is a shortened and more casual way of saying “because of the.” It is commonly used in informal speech or writing.

  • For instance, “I’m tired ’cause of the long day.”
  • A person might explain, “‘Cause of the bad weather, the game was canceled.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “I couldn’t finish the project ’cause of the tight deadline.”

76. ‘Cuzza

A slang term used to mean “because of”. It is derived from the contraction of “because” and “of”.

  • For example, “I couldn’t go to the party ‘cuzza my car broke down.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m feeling tired ‘cuzza the late-night studying.”
  • In a conversation about missed opportunities, a person might explain, “I didn’t get the job ‘cuzza my lack of experience.”

77. Cuzzie

A slang term used as a shortened version of “because”. It is commonly used in informal conversations or text messages.

  • For instance, “I can’t come to the party cuzzie I have to work.”
  • A person might say, “I stayed home cuzzie I wasn’t feeling well.”
  • In a text message, someone might write, “I’ll be late cuzzie traffic is terrible.”
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