Top 48 Slang For Begin – Meaning & Usage

Starting something new can be both exciting and intimidating. Whether you’re embarking on a new hobby or starting a new chapter in your life, having the right slang and phrases in your vocabulary can make you feel more confident and in-the-know. That’s why we’ve put together a list of the top slang words and phrases for “begin” that will help you navigate any new experience with ease. Get ready to level up your slang game and start off on the right foot!

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1. Kick off

This phrase means to begin or start something. It is often used in reference to the beginning of a game or event.

  • For example, “Let’s kick off the meeting with a quick introduction.”
  • During a football match, a commentator might say, “The home team will kick off the game.”
  • A concert might be described as, “The band kicked off their tour with a high-energy performance.”

2. Get going

This slang phrase means to begin or start something. It is often used to encourage or prompt someone to start a task or activity.

  • For instance, “Come on, let’s get going on this project.”
  • A friend might say, “We should get going if we want to catch the movie.”
  • When starting a road trip, someone might say, “Time to get going and hit the road.”

3. Set about

This phrase means to start or begin a task or activity. It is often used when describing the process of beginning something in a deliberate or purposeful manner.

  • For example, “She set about cleaning the house with determination.”
  • When starting a new project, someone might say, “I need to set about organizing my ideas.”
  • A writer might describe their process as, “I set about writing the first draft of my novel.”

4. Embark on

This phrase means to start or begin a new endeavor or journey. It is often used when describing the process of starting something significant or challenging.

  • For instance, “She embarked on a new career path after finishing college.”
  • A traveler might say, “I’m about to embark on a backpacking adventure through Europe.”
  • When starting a new business, someone might say, “I am ready to embark on this entrepreneurial journey.”

5. Dive in

This phrase means to start or begin something with enthusiasm or eagerness. It is often used when encouraging someone to start a task or activity wholeheartedly.

  • For example, “Don’t be afraid to dive in and try new things.”
  • When starting a new job, someone might say, “I’m excited to dive in and learn all about the company.”
  • A chef might say, “Let’s dive in and start cooking this delicious meal.”

6. Launch

To start or begin something, often with a significant event or action. “Launch” can also refer to the introduction of a new product or initiative.

  • For example, a company might announce, “We are going to launch our new website next week.”
  • In a conversation about a space mission, someone might say, “The rocket is scheduled to launch tomorrow morning.”
  • A person discussing a book release might mention, “The author will launch their latest novel at a book signing event.”

7. Start off

To begin or initiate something. “Start off” is often used to describe the first step or action in a series of events or tasks.

  • For instance, a coach might say, “Let’s start off the game with a strong offense.”
  • In a cooking tutorial, the instructor might explain, “Start off by preheating the oven to 350 degrees.”
  • A person planning their day might say, “I’ll start off by checking my emails and making a to-do list.”

8. Tear into

To start or begin something with great enthusiasm, energy, or intensity. “Tear into” implies a strong and eager approach to starting a task or activity.

  • For example, a student might say, “I’m going to tear into my homework as soon as I get home.”
  • In a discussion about a new project, someone might suggest, “Let’s tear into it and get started right away.”
  • A person describing their workout routine might say, “I always tear into my morning workout to get my day off to a strong start.”

9. Make a start on

To initiate or begin working on a task or project. “Make a start on” implies taking the first steps towards completing a task or making progress.

  • For instance, a painter might say, “I need to make a start on this new canvas.”
  • In a conversation about a renovation project, someone might mention, “We finally made a start on remodeling the kitchen.”
  • A person discussing their goals might say, “I’m going to make a start on my fitness journey by going for a run today.”

10. Get down to

To begin or start focusing on a task or activity. “Get down to” implies a shift in attention or mindset towards starting a specific task or goal.

  • For example, a writer might say, “I need to get down to writing this article.”
  • In a discussion about a work project, someone might suggest, “Let’s get down to business and start brainstorming ideas.”
  • A person planning their day might say, “After breakfast, I’ll get down to cleaning the house.”

11. Get stuck into

This phrase is often used to describe someone who is eager to begin a task or activity.

  • For example, “I can’t wait to get stuck into this new project.”
  • A person might say, “I got stuck into cleaning my house and ended up organizing my entire closet.”
  • Another might exclaim, “Let’s get stuck into this delicious meal!”

12. Go ahead with

This phrase is used to indicate that someone is moving forward with a plan or decision.

  • For instance, “We have received approval to go ahead with the construction project.”
  • A person might say, “Despite the obstacles, we decided to go ahead with our travel plans.”
  • Another might ask, “Are you sure you want to go ahead with this risky investment?”

13. Set upon

This phrase is often used to describe a sudden and aggressive start to an action or attack.

  • For example, “The dog set upon the intruder, defending its territory.”
  • A person might say, “I watched as the players set upon the ball, eager to score a goal.”
  • Another might exclaim, “The protesters set upon the police, resulting in a chaotic clash.”

14. Inaugurate

This term is typically used to describe the formal beginning or introduction of a new venture or project.

  • For instance, “The president will inaugurate the new hospital with a ribbon-cutting ceremony.”
  • A person might say, “The mayor inaugurated the city’s annual festival with a speech.”
  • Another might announce, “We will be inaugurating a new program to support local artists.”

15. Kick-start

This phrase is often used to describe a rapid or forceful start to an activity or process.

  • For example, “We need to kick-start this project to meet the deadline.”
  • A person might say, “A cup of coffee in the morning helps me kick-start my day.”
  • Another might exclaim, “Let’s kick-start this party with some lively music!”

16. Initiate

To begin or start something. The term “initiate” often implies the beginning of a process or action.

  • For instance, a project manager might say, “Let’s initiate the next phase of the project.”
  • In a conversation about a new business venture, someone might suggest, “We should initiate discussions with potential investors.”
  • A team leader might instruct, “Initiate the launch sequence and prepare for takeoff.”

17. Open up

To start or begin something. “Open up” can refer to starting a conversation, activity, or event.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Let’s open up the discussion to different perspectives.”
  • In a social setting, someone might suggest, “Why don’t we open up the dance floor and start the party?”
  • A coach might encourage their team, “It’s time to open up the game and show our skills.”

18. Fire up

To start or begin something with enthusiasm or energy. “Fire up” often implies a sense of excitement or motivation.

  • For instance, a coach might say, “Let’s fire up the team and give it our all.”
  • In a motivational speech, someone might exclaim, “It’s time to fire up your passion and pursue your dreams!”
  • A friend might encourage another by saying, “Come on, let’s fire up the grill and have a barbecue!”

19. Break ground

To begin a construction project or any kind of physical work. “Break ground” refers to the act of breaking the surface of the ground to initiate construction.

  • For example, a construction manager might announce, “We’re finally ready to break ground on the new building.”
  • In a discussion about infrastructure development, someone might say, “The city plans to break ground on the new highway next month.”
  • A homeowner might excitedly share, “We’re breaking ground on our dream house next week!”

20. Break the ice

To initiate or start a conversation or interaction, especially in a situation where people are unfamiliar or uncomfortable with each other. “Break the ice” refers to breaking the initial tension or awkwardness.

  • For instance, at a networking event, someone might say, “I’ll go introduce myself and try to break the ice.”
  • In a team-building activity, a facilitator might suggest, “Let’s play a game to break the ice and get to know each other.”
  • A person attending a party might ask, “How can I break the ice and make new friends?”

21. Bring about

To bring about means to cause or initiate something. It refers to the action of starting or beginning a process or event.

  • For example, “The new policy will bring about significant changes in the company.”
  • A person discussing social change might say, “We need to bring about a shift in public opinion.”
  • In a conversation about personal growth, someone might advise, “You have the power to bring about positive change in your life.”

22. Plunge into

To plunge into means to start or begin something with enthusiasm or intensity. It implies taking a deep and committed approach to starting a new endeavor.

  • For instance, “She decided to plunge into her new business venture.”
  • A person discussing a new hobby might say, “I’m ready to plunge into painting and explore my creativity.”
  • In a conversation about starting a new relationship, someone might say, “I’m ready to plunge into the dating scene and meet new people.”

23. Set in motion

To set in motion means to start or begin a process or action. It implies the act of initiating or triggering something to start moving or progressing.

  • For example, “The new project set in motion a series of changes within the organization.”
  • A person discussing a new initiative might say, “We need to set in motion a plan to address the issue.”
  • In a conversation about starting a new business, someone might advise, “You need to set in motion a solid marketing strategy to attract customers.”

24. Take the first step

To take the first step means to be the one to initiate or start something. It refers to the act of being proactive and taking the initial action in a process or endeavor.

  • For instance, “She decided to take the first step and reach out to potential investors.”
  • A person discussing personal growth might say, “Taking the first step towards self-improvement is crucial.”
  • In a conversation about starting a new project, someone might advise, “Don’t be afraid to take the first step and get things moving.”

25. Start up

To start up means to begin or initiate something, especially a new business or project. It refers to the action of starting or launching a venture or endeavor.

  • For example, “They decided to start up their own company after years of planning.”
  • A person discussing entrepreneurship might say, “Starting up a business requires careful planning and execution.”
  • In a conversation about pursuing a passion, someone might advise, “It’s never too late to start up a new hobby or career path.”

26. Launch into

When you “launch into” something, you begin it with a lot of energy and enthusiasm.

  • For example, “She launched into her presentation with confidence and captivated the audience.”
  • In a conversation about a new project, someone might say, “Let’s launch into it and get started right away.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “Now, let’s launch into our next lesson and explore this topic in depth.”

27. Jump into

When you “jump into” something, you begin it quickly and without hesitation.

  • For instance, “He jumped into the task and completed it in record time.”
  • In a discussion about trying new things, someone might say, “Don’t be afraid to jump into new experiences and see where they take you.”
  • A coach might encourage their team by saying, “Let’s jump into this game with full force and show our opponents what we’re made of.”

28. Commence

When you “commence” something, you start or begin it in a formal or official manner.

  • For example, “The ceremony will commence with the national anthem.”
  • In a business meeting, someone might say, “Let’s commence the presentation by outlining our objectives.”
  • A teacher might instruct their students, “Please take your seats, and we will commence our lesson for today.”

29. Usher in

When you “usher in” something, you introduce or bring about something new or significant.

  • For instance, “The new technology will usher in a new era of communication.”
  • In a discussion about social changes, someone might say, “The civil rights movement ushered in a period of significant progress.”
  • A journalist might write, “The new policy is expected to usher in a wave of economic growth.”

30. Start on

When you “start on” something, you begin working on it or taking action.

  • For example, “I need to start on my homework before it gets too late.”
  • In a conversation about a project, someone might say, “Let’s start on the research phase and gather all the necessary information.”
  • A manager might assign tasks by saying, “I want you to start on the report and have it ready by the end of the week.”

31. Take up

This phrase is used to indicate starting or beginning an activity or task. It implies taking on a new responsibility or action.

  • For example, “I decided to take up painting as a hobby.”
  • In a conversation about learning a new language, someone might say, “I’m thinking of taking up Spanish.”
  • A friend might suggest, “Why don’t you take up jogging to stay fit?”

32. Proceed with

This phrase is used to indicate moving forward or continuing with a particular action or plan. It implies a continuation of something that has already started.

  • For instance, “Let’s proceed with the meeting agenda.”
  • In a discussion about a project, someone might say, “We need to proceed with the next phase.”
  • A teacher might instruct, “Please proceed with the next exercise in your textbook.”

33. Get going on

This phrase is used to encourage or prompt someone to begin a task or activity. It implies initiating action or starting to work on something.

  • For example, “It’s time to get going on your homework.”
  • In a conversation about a project, someone might say, “We should get going on the research.”
  • A boss might instruct an employee, “Get going on that report as soon as possible.”

34. Get the ball rolling

This phrase is used to suggest initiating an activity or process. It implies starting something or taking the first step to get things moving.

  • For instance, “Let’s get the ball rolling on the new project.”
  • In a discussion about organizing an event, someone might say, “We need to get the ball rolling on finding a venue.”
  • A team leader might encourage the team, “Let’s get the ball rolling and brainstorm some ideas.”

35. Jumpstart

This term is used to describe giving something a boost or initiating it with energy. It implies starting or beginning something with enthusiasm or vigor.

  • For example, “I need a cup of coffee to jumpstart my day.”
  • In a conversation about a stalled project, someone might say, “We need to jumpstart the progress.”
  • A motivational speaker might encourage the audience, “Let’s jumpstart our goals and take action today.”

36. Fire off

This phrase means to begin something quickly or abruptly, often with a sense of urgency or intensity.

  • For example, “Let’s fire off this email before the deadline.”
  • In a sports context, a coach might say, “Fire off the line as soon as the ball is snapped.”
  • A teacher might instruct students, “Fire off your questions if you have any.”

37. Lay the groundwork

This phrase means to do the necessary preliminary work or create a solid foundation for a project or plan.

  • For instance, “Before launching a new product, we need to lay the groundwork by conducting market research.”
  • In a business context, a manager might say, “Let’s lay the groundwork for a successful partnership with this client.”
  • A politician might discuss the importance of laying the groundwork for long-term economic growth.
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38. Strike up

This phrase means to begin or initiate a conversation or relationship, often in a friendly or informal manner.

  • For example, “He struck up a conversation with a stranger at the coffee shop.”
  • In a social setting, someone might say, “I’m going to strike up a conversation with that interesting person.”
  • A salesperson might use this phrase when approaching potential customers, “I’ll strike up a conversation and see if they’re interested in our product.”

39. Open the floodgates

This phrase means to allow something to start or happen in a big or unrestricted way.

  • For instance, “The new policy opened the floodgates for a wave of criticism.”
  • In a creative context, someone might say, “The new technology has opened the floodgates for innovative ideas.”
  • A manager might warn, “Be careful with social media promotion, it can open the floodgates of negative comments.”

40. Set the wheels in motion

This phrase means to initiate or start a process or plan, often with the intention of progressing towards a goal or outcome.

  • For example, “We need to set the wheels in motion for the new project.”
  • In a business context, a CEO might say, “Let’s set the wheels in motion for our expansion into international markets.”
  • A team leader might discuss the importance of setting the wheels in motion for a successful project.

41. Turn the key

This phrase is used to mean to begin or start something, often in a literal sense of starting a vehicle by turning the ignition key.

  • For example, “Let’s turn the key and get this road trip started!”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “We need to turn the key on this new project and get it off the ground.”
  • A coach might motivate their team by saying, “It’s time to turn the key and give it your all in this game.”

42. Get the show on the road

This slang phrase means to begin or start something, especially an event or activity that involves multiple people or moving parts. It is often used to encourage action or progress.

  • For instance, “Enough talking, let’s get the show on the road and start working.”
  • In a team meeting, someone might say, “We’ve discussed the plan enough, now it’s time to get the show on the road.”
  • A teacher might say to their students, “Let’s get the show on the road and start our lesson for today.”

43. Start off on the right foot

This phrase means to begin something in a positive or favorable manner, often with the intention of setting a good tone or foundation for what follows.

  • For example, “I want to start off on the right foot with my new job by being punctual and prepared.”
  • In a relationship, someone might say, “Let’s start off on the right foot and communicate openly and honestly.”
  • A coach might advise their team, “If we want to win this game, we need to start off on the right foot and score early.”

44. Embark

This word means to begin or start a journey, project, or new endeavor. It often implies a sense of excitement or anticipation for what lies ahead.

  • For instance, “We are about to embark on a new adventure together.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “We’re excited to embark on this new project and see it through to success.”
  • A traveler might post on social media, “About to embark on a solo trip around the world. Wish me luck!”

45. Kickstart

This slang term means to initiate or start something, often with energy and enthusiasm. It can also refer to giving something a boost or jump-start.

  • For example, “Let’s kickstart this party by playing some upbeat music.”
  • In a creative project, someone might say, “I need some inspiration to kickstart my writing.”
  • A business owner might announce, “We’re launching a new marketing campaign to kickstart sales.”

46. Take off

To begin or start something. It can refer to the beginning of an event, activity, or process.

  • For example, “Let’s take off this meeting with a quick introduction.”
  • In a conversation about a new business venture, someone might say, “We’re planning to take off with our product launch next month.”
  • A coach might motivate their team by saying, “It’s time to take off and give it our all!”

47. Ring in

To celebrate the beginning of something, usually a new year or an event. It can also refer to the act of starting or initiating something.

  • For instance, “We’re going to ring in the New Year with a big party.”
  • In a discussion about wedding traditions, someone might mention, “It’s common to ring in the marriage ceremony with the sound of bells.”
  • A person might say, “Let’s ring in the weekend with a night out on the town!”

48. Get things rolling

To start or initiate a process or activity. It can also refer to getting a project or plan started.

  • For example, “Let’s get things rolling by assigning tasks to each team member.”
  • In a conversation about organizing an event, someone might say, “We need to get things rolling and secure the venue.”
  • A leader might motivate their team by saying, “It’s time to get things rolling and achieve our goals!”