Top 40 Slang For Believe – Meaning & Usage

Belief is a powerful thing, and language is constantly evolving to capture its essence. From casual conversations to social media posts, there are countless slang words and phrases that express the act of believing. In this listicle, we’ve gathered the top slang for believe that will have you nodding in agreement and saying “I feel that!” So, buckle up and get ready to dive into the vibrant world of modern language and discover the coolest ways to express your belief in everyday conversations.

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1. Keep the faith

– For example, “Even though times are tough, we have to keep the faith that things will get better.”

  • A person might say, “I know it’s a difficult situation, but keep the faith and stay positive.”
  • In a motivational speech, someone might encourage others by saying, “Keep the faith and never give up on your dreams.”

2. Presume true

– For instance, “I don’t have all the facts, but I’ll presume true that he’s innocent until proven guilty.”

  • A person might say, “Based on the evidence presented, I presume true that the theory is accurate.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “I presume true that she’ll be at the party tonight.”

3. Reckon on it

– For example, “I reckon on it that they’ll arrive late, as usual.”

  • A person might say, “I reckon on it that he’ll be promoted soon, given his hard work.”
  • In a discussion about future plans, someone might say, “I reckon on it that we’ll be able to go on vacation next month.”

4. Rest assured

– For instance, “You can rest assured that your personal information will remain confidential.”

  • A person might say, “Rest assured, we have a backup plan in case anything goes wrong.”
  • In a reassuring tone, someone might say, “Rest assured that everything will be taken care of.”

5. Take as gospel

– For example, “Don’t take everything he says as gospel; he tends to exaggerate.”

  • A person might say, “I’ve known her for years, so I take her advice as gospel.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might say, “We shouldn’t take biased research as gospel; it’s important to consider multiple perspectives.”

6. Take it as gospel

This phrase means to believe something as if it were unquestionable truth or fact. It implies complete trust and faith in the information or statement.

  • For example, “He told me that the sky is purple, and I took it as gospel.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial theory, someone might say, “I don’t take it as gospel, but it’s an interesting idea.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve known her for years, so when she tells me something, I take it as gospel.”

7. Have faith

This phrase means to believe in something or someone without any concrete evidence or proof. It implies trust and confidence in the reliability or truthfulness of the subject.

  • For instance, “I have faith that everything will work out in the end.”
  • In a religious context, someone might say, “I have faith in God’s plan.”
  • A person might say, “I have faith in my team to win the game.”

8. Count on it

This phrase means to have full confidence and trust that something will happen or be true. It implies reliance and dependence on the subject.

  • For example, “You can count on me to be there on time.”
  • In a discussion about a friend’s reliability, someone might say, “You can always count on her to keep her promises.”
  • A person might say, “I can count on my car to start every morning.”

9. Buy into it

This phrase means to accept or believe something, often without much critical thinking or evidence. It implies a willingness to believe or be convinced by something.

  • For instance, “I’m not buying into their conspiracy theories.”
  • In a conversation about a new diet trend, someone might say, “I’m not buying into the hype.”
  • A person might say, “I bought into his story at first, but now I realize it was all a lie.”

10. Have no doubt

This phrase means to be completely certain or sure about something. It implies a lack of any doubt or uncertainty.

  • For example, “I have no doubt that she will succeed in her career.”
  • In a discussion about a friend’s honesty, someone might say, “I have no doubt that he is telling the truth.”
  • A person might say, “I have no doubt that this team will win the championship.”

11. Put stock in it

This phrase means to have confidence or trust in something or someone. It implies that you have faith in the reliability or truthfulness of a particular idea or statement.

  • For example, if someone says, “I put stock in what my horoscope predicts,” they are indicating that they believe in the accuracy of horoscopes.
  • In a conversation about a new scientific discovery, a person might say, “I put stock in the research conducted by reputable scientists.”
  • A friend might reassure another by saying, “You can put stock in my advice. I’ve been through a similar situation before.”

12. Take it to heart

This phrase means to deeply believe or be affected by something. It implies that you give great importance or significance to a particular idea, comment, or action.

  • For instance, if someone says, “Don’t take their criticism to heart,” they are advising you not to let negative comments affect your self-esteem.
  • In a conversation about personal growth, a person might say, “I take feedback from my mentors to heart and use it to improve.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “I hope you take my words of encouragement to heart and believe in yourself.”

13. Have no reason to doubt

This phrase means to believe something completely without any doubts or reservations. It implies that you have complete confidence in the truth or reliability of a particular statement or claim.

  • For example, if someone says, “I have no reason to doubt their sincerity,” they are indicating that they fully believe the person is being honest.
  • In a discussion about a friend’s trustworthiness, a person might say, “I have known them for years and have no reason to doubt their loyalty.”
  • A teacher might say to a student, “Based on your consistent hard work, I have no reason to doubt your ability to succeed.”

14. Take someone’s word for it

This phrase means to believe what someone says without any evidence or proof. It implies that you trust the person’s honesty or credibility and accept their statement as true.

  • For instance, if someone says, “I’ll take your word for it,” they are indicating that they believe what you say without questioning or seeking further evidence.
  • In a conversation about a particular event, a person might say, “I wasn’t there, but I’ll take their word for it.”
  • A friend might say to another, “You don’t have to prove it to me. I’ll take your word for it.”

15. Have a gut feeling

This phrase means to have a strong instinctive belief or intuition about something. It implies that you rely on your gut or inner sense to form a belief or make a judgment.

  • For example, if someone says, “I have a gut feeling that something is wrong,” they are indicating that they believe something is amiss based on their intuition.
  • In a discussion about making a decision, a person might say, “I have a gut feeling that this is the right choice.”
  • A detective might say, “I trust my gut feelings when solving cases. They often lead me in the right direction.”

16. Take it on faith

This phrase means to accept or believe something without any evidence or proof. It implies trusting in something or someone based solely on faith or intuition.

  • For example, someone might say, “I can’t prove it, but I’ll just have to take it on faith that everything will work out.”
  • In a religious context, a person might say, “I take it on faith that there is a higher power guiding us.”
  • Another usage could be, “Even though I don’t understand it fully, I take it on faith that the universe has a plan.”

17. Give it credence

To give something credence means to consider it as valid or reliable. It implies believing in or placing trust in something or someone.

  • For instance, if someone presents a theory, you might say, “I give that theory credence because it is supported by scientific evidence.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, one might say, “I give her argument credence because she has done extensive research.”
  • A person might state, “I give the claims of this product credence because I have seen positive reviews from trusted sources.”

18. Put faith in it

To put faith in something means to have trust or confidence in it. It implies believing in the reliability or effectiveness of something or someone.

  • For example, if a friend promises to help you, you might say, “I put my faith in her to follow through.”
  • In a discussion about a new technology, one might say, “I put my faith in this device’s ability to improve our lives.”
  • A person might state, “I put my faith in this team to win the championship because they have consistently performed well.”

19. Have no qualms about

To have no qualms about something means to have no doubts or reservations about it. It implies complete confidence or belief in something or someone.

  • For instance, if someone asks if you’re sure about a decision, you might say, “I have no qualms about it; I know it’s the right choice.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial action, one might say, “He had no qualms about speaking his mind, even if it upset others.”
  • A person might state, “I have no qualms about recommending this book; it’s a great read.”

20. Have a hunch

To have a hunch means to have a strong intuition or feeling about something. It implies a belief or suspicion based on instinct rather than concrete evidence.

  • For example, if you have a feeling that something will happen, you might say, “I have a hunch that we’ll win the game.”
  • In a discussion about a missing item, one might say, “I have a hunch that it’s in the basement.”
  • A person might state, “I have a hunch that they’re hiding something from us.”

21. Buy into

When someone is convinced or persuaded to believe in something, they are said to “buy into” it.

  • For example, “She really bought into the idea that he was innocent.”
  • In a discussion about conspiracy theories, someone might say, “I don’t buy into all that government cover-up stuff.”
  • A person might express skepticism by saying, “I’m not buying into their excuses.”

22. Swallow

When someone believes something without hesitation or skepticism, they are said to “swallow” it.

  • For instance, “He swallowed the story about the lost dog and gave them money.”
  • In a conversation about a scam, someone might say, “I can’t believe people actually swallow those get-rich-quick schemes.”
  • A person might express disbelief by saying, “I’m not swallowing that excuse.”

23. Take at face value

When someone accepts something without delving deeper or seeking evidence, they are said to “take it at face value.”

  • For example, “I took her compliments at face value and didn’t suspect any ulterior motives.”
  • In a discussion about news articles, someone might say, “Don’t just take everything you read at face value; do your research.”
  • A person might express caution by saying, “I don’t take his promises at face value anymore.”

24. Fall for

When someone is fooled or tricked into believing something, they are said to “fall for” it.

  • For instance, “She fell for his lies and ended up getting hurt.”
  • In a conversation about scams, someone might say, “Don’t fall for those phishing emails; they’re just trying to steal your information.”
  • A person might express regret by saying, “I can’t believe I fell for his manipulations.”

25. Put stock in

When someone believes in or relies on something or someone, they are said to “put stock in” it.

  • For example, “I put a lot of stock in his advice; he’s never steered me wrong before.”
  • In a discussion about predictions, someone might say, “I don’t put much stock in those fortune tellers.”
  • A person might express doubt by saying, “I used to put stock in their promises, but not anymore.”

26. Count on

To rely on someone or something for support or assistance.

  • For example, “You can count on me to be there for you.”
  • A friend might say, “I know I can count on you to keep my secret.”
  • In a work setting, a colleague might say, “You can count on our team to meet the deadline.”

27. Have confidence in

To have trust or belief in someone or something.

  • For instance, “I have confidence in my abilities to succeed.”
  • A teacher might tell a student, “I have confidence in your ability to do well on the test.”
  • A parent might say, “I have confidence in you to make the right decision.”

28. Give credence to

To believe or consider something to be true or valid.

  • For example, “I give credence to the theory that aliens exist.”
  • A scientist might say, “The evidence gives credence to the hypothesis.”
  • A journalist might write, “The witness testimony gives credence to the victim’s account.”

29. Put faith in

To trust or have faith in someone or something.

  • For instance, “I put my faith in you to make the right choice.”
  • A religious person might say, “I put my faith in a higher power.”
  • A coach might tell a team, “Put your faith in each other and work together.”

30. Take as true

To accept or believe something to be true.

  • For example, “I take it as true that honesty is the best policy.”
  • A philosopher might argue, “Taking something as true requires evidence and logical reasoning.”
  • A friend might say, “I take your word as true and trust your judgment.”

31. Have no reservations

This phrase means to believe something without any doubt or hesitation. It indicates a strong and unwavering belief.

  • For example, “I have no reservations about his innocence. I believe he is completely innocent.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might say, “I have no reservations about supporting this cause. I believe in it wholeheartedly.”
  • A person might express their trust in a friend by saying, “I have no reservations about lending him money. I believe he will pay me back.”

32. Put your money on

This slang phrase means to believe in someone or something enough to invest or bet on them. It implies confidence in their abilities or chances of success.

  • For instance, “I would put my money on her to win the competition. She’s incredibly talented.”
  • In a sports discussion, someone might say, “I’m putting my money on the home team. I believe they will come out victorious.”
  • A person might express their belief in a particular stock by saying, “I’m putting my money on this company. I believe it will perform well in the market.”

33. Have a feeling

This slang phrase refers to a belief or belief based on intuition or a gut feeling. It suggests a belief that is not necessarily based on concrete evidence or logical reasoning.

  • For example, “I have a feeling that something good is going to happen today.”
  • In a discussion about a person’s character, someone might say, “I have a feeling that he can’t be trusted. There’s something off about him.”
  • A person might express their belief in an upcoming event by saying, “I have a feeling that this party is going to be amazing.”

34. Go along with

This slang phrase means to believe or agree with something or someone. It suggests a willingness to accept and support a particular belief or viewpoint.

  • For instance, “I’m going along with her plan. I believe it’s the best course of action.”
  • In a group discussion, someone might say, “I’m going along with their idea. I believe it will lead to success.”
  • A person might express their belief in a friend’s decision by saying, “I’m going along with his choice. I believe he knows what’s best for himself.”

35. Have a strong belief

This phrase means to firmly believe in something. It indicates a strong and unwavering belief or conviction.

  • For example, “I have a strong belief in the power of education. I believe it can change lives.”
  • In a philosophical discussion, someone might say, “I have a strong belief in the existence of free will. I believe we have the ability to make choices.”
  • A person might express their belief in a cause by saying, “I have a strong belief in equality. I believe everyone should be treated with fairness and respect.”

36. Take as read

This phrase means to accept something as true or valid without needing further evidence or confirmation.

  • For example, “You can take it as read that he will always be late.”
  • In a discussion about a well-known fact, someone might say, “We can take it as read that the Earth is round.”
  • Another usage could be, “I’ve known her for years, so you can take it as read that she’s trustworthy.”

37. Have a conviction

This phrase means to have a strong belief or opinion about something, often based on personal experience or core values.

  • For instance, “She has a conviction that everyone deserves equal rights.”
  • In a debate about a controversial topic, someone might say, “I have a conviction that capital punishment is morally wrong.”
  • Another usage could be, “He had a conviction that hard work always pays off.”

38. Put your trust in

This phrase means to have confidence in someone or something and rely on them or it.

  • For example, “You can put your trust in her to get the job done.”
  • In a discussion about a reliable product, someone might say, “I always put my trust in this brand.”
  • Another usage could be, “It’s important to put your trust in your teammates during a group project.”

39. Have no qualms

This phrase means to have no hesitation or doubts about something, often implying a lack of moral or ethical concerns.

  • For instance, “He has no qualms about speaking his mind.”
  • In a discussion about taking risks, someone might say, “I have no qualms about trying something new.”
  • Another usage could be, “She had no qualms about breaking the rules to achieve her goals.”

40. Put your faith in

This phrase means to trust or have confidence in someone or something completely.

  • For example, “You can put your faith in him to keep his promises.”
  • In a discussion about a reliable friend, someone might say, “I always put my faith in her to support me.”
  • Another usage could be, “During difficult times, it’s important to put your faith in yourself.”
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