Top 56 Slang For Believed – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to expressing belief or trust in something, language can play a key role in conveying our thoughts. Navigating the world of slang for “believed” can add a fun and dynamic twist to your everyday conversations. Our team has put together a list of the most popular and trendy phrases that capture the essence of belief in a whole new light. Get ready to spice up your vocabulary and impress your friends with these fresh takes on expressing belief!

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1. Bought it

This phrase is used to describe someone who unquestioningly believes something, often without critically examining the information or claims.

  • For example, “He told me he was a millionaire, and I just bought it.”
  • In a discussion about a conspiracy theory, someone might say, “Don’t be so gullible, don’t buy it.”
  • A person might admit, “I can’t believe I bought it, I feel so foolish now.”

2. Swallowed it

Similar to “bought it,” this phrase means to accept or believe something without questioning its accuracy or validity.

  • For instance, “He told me he was a famous actor, and I swallowed it hook, line, and sinker.”
  • In a conversation about a scam, someone might say, “I can’t believe how many people swallowed it and lost their money.”
  • A person might confess, “I can’t believe I swallowed it, I should have been more skeptical.”

3. Fell for it

This phrase is used to describe someone who has been tricked or deceived into believing something.

  • For example, “He told me he had a rare artifact for sale, and I fell for it.”
  • In a discussion about a prank, someone might say, “I can’t believe I fell for it, they got me good.”
  • A person might admit, “I feel so dumb, I can’t believe I fell for it.”

4. Took the bait

This phrase is used to describe someone who has been lured or enticed into believing something, often by someone else’s manipulation or deception.

  • For instance, “He presented a too-good-to-be-true investment opportunity, and I took the bait.”
  • In a conversation about a scam, someone might say, “Many people took the bait and lost their life savings.”
  • A person might confess, “I can’t believe I took the bait, I should have known better.”

5. Drank the Kool-Aid

This phrase originated from the tragic events of the Jonestown Massacre, where cult members drank poisoned Kool-Aid. It is now used colloquially to describe someone who fully embraces and believes in a particular ideology or belief system.

  • For example, “He joined a new religious group and completely drank the Kool-Aid.”
  • In a discussion about blind loyalty, someone might say, “I can’t believe how many people have drunk the Kool-Aid and follow blindly.”
  • A person might admit, “I used to be a skeptic, but I drank the Kool-Aid and now I’m a true believer.”

6. Bit the hook

When someone “bites the hook,” it means they have been easily convinced or deceived by something or someone. The phrase is often used to describe someone who believed a lie or a false story without questioning it.

  • For example, “He bit the hook and believed that he had won the lottery.”
  • In a conversation about a scam, someone might say, “Don’t be so gullible and bite the hook.”
  • A friend might jokingly say, “I told her there were unicorns in the park, and she totally bit the hook!”

7. Took the hook

Similar to “bit the hook,” when someone “takes the hook,” it means they have been easily convinced or deceived by something or someone. The phrase is often used to describe someone who believed a lie or a false story without questioning it.

  • For instance, “She took the hook and believed that her ex-boyfriend had changed.”
  • In a discussion about conspiracy theories, someone might say, “People who take the hook are susceptible to believing anything.”
  • A person might admit, “I took the hook and fell for a scam once, but I learned my lesson.”

8. Bought the story

When someone “buys the story,” it means they have accepted or believed a particular explanation or account of events, even if it may not be entirely true or accurate. The phrase is often used to describe someone who unquestioningly accepts a story or explanation without skepticism.

  • For example, “She bought the story that her friend was sick and couldn’t attend the party.”
  • In a conversation about a suspicious alibi, someone might say, “I don’t buy the story that he was out of town during the crime.”
  • A friend might admit, “I bought the story that my sibling didn’t eat the last slice of pizza, but I later found the evidence.”

9. Lapped it up

When someone “laps it up,” it means they have eagerly and unquestioningly accepted or believed something, often without considering its validity or truthfulness. The phrase is often used to describe someone who readily accepts information or a story without skepticism.

  • For instance, “He lapped it up and believed every word of the sales pitch.”
  • In a discussion about a misleading advertisement, someone might say, “Don’t be fooled by those claims. They want you to lap it up.”
  • A person might admit, “I lapped up the gossip about my coworker, but I later realized it was all rumors.”

10. Ate it up

Similar to “lapped it up,” when someone “eats it up,” it means they have eagerly and unquestioningly accepted or believed something, often without considering its validity or truthfulness. The phrase is often used to describe someone who readily accepts information or a story without skepticism.

  • For example, “She ate it up and believed the exaggerated story about her favorite celebrity.”
  • In a conversation about a misleading news article, someone might say, “People who eat it up without fact-checking contribute to the spread of misinformation.”
  • A friend might admit, “I ate up the excuse my sibling gave for not doing their chores, but I later realized it was just an excuse.”

11. Gobbled it up

This phrase is often used to describe someone who unquestioningly believes something they are told or presented with.

  • For example, “He heard the conspiracy theory and gobbled it up without any skepticism.”
  • A person might say, “I presented the evidence to him, and he gobbled it up right away.”
  • In a discussion about fake news, someone might comment, “People need to be more critical thinkers and not just gobble up everything they see online.”

12. Took it in

This phrase is used to express that someone has accepted or believed something, often without much hesitation.

  • For instance, “She told him the news, and he took it in immediately.”
  • In a conversation about a surprising revelation, someone might say, “I couldn’t believe it at first, but eventually, I took it in.”
  • A person might comment, “He’s a gullible person who takes in every rumor he hears.”

13. Took it hook, line, and sinker

This phrase is used to describe someone who falls for a deception or a trick, believing it completely.

  • For example, “The scammer told him a convincing story, and he took it hook, line, and sinker.”
  • In a discussion about a practical joke, someone might say, “He set up the prank perfectly, and she took it hook, line, and sinker.”
  • A person might comment, “Don’t be so gullible; they’re trying to make you take it hook, line, and sinker.”

14. Took it at face value

This phrase is used to express that someone accepts or believes something without questioning or analyzing it further.

  • For instance, “He didn’t question the information; he took it at face value.”
  • In a conversation about a statement, someone might say, “I didn’t have any reason to doubt her, so I took it at face value.”
  • A person might comment, “It’s important to be critical of what you hear and not just take it at face value.”

15. Took it as gospel

This phrase is used to describe someone who believes something without any doubt or skepticism, treating it as an absolute truth.

  • For example, “He heard the advice from the expert and took it as gospel.”
  • In a discussion about religious beliefs, someone might say, “They were raised in a strict household, so they took it as gospel.”
  • A person might comment, “You shouldn’t take everything you hear as gospel; always question and seek evidence.”

16. Took it as truth

When someone takes something as truth, it means they accept it as a fact or reality without questioning its accuracy or validity.

  • For example, “He told me that aliens exist, and I took it as truth.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might say, “I heard it from a reliable source, so I took it as truth.”
  • Another person might share, “The news article was convincing, so I took it as truth until proven otherwise.”

17. Took it as fact

When someone takes something as fact, it means they believe it to be true without questioning its accuracy or validity.

  • For instance, “She told me the sky is green, and I took it as fact.”
  • In a debate, one might assert, “The scientific evidence supports this claim, so it should be taken as fact.”
  • A person might state, “I saw it with my own eyes, so I took it as fact.”

18. Took it as legit

When someone takes something as legit, it means they believe it to be legitimate or genuine without questioning its authenticity or validity.

  • For example, “He showed me his ID, and I took it as legit.”
  • In a discussion about a product, someone might say, “The reviews were positive, so I took it as legit.”
  • Another person might share, “The document had an official seal, so I took it as legit.”

19. Took it as real

When someone takes something as real, it means they believe it to be true or genuine without doubting its authenticity or validity.

  • For instance, “He told me the story of his adventure, and I took it as real.”
  • In a conversation about a supernatural event, someone might say, “I witnessed it myself, so I took it as real.”
  • A person might state, “The evidence presented was convincing, so I took it as real.”

20. Took it as genuine

When someone takes something as genuine, it means they believe it to be authentic or sincere without doubting its truthfulness or validity.

  • For example, “She expressed her gratitude, and I took it as genuine.”
  • In a discussion about a person’s intentions, someone might say, “Their actions were consistent, so I took it as genuine.”
  • Another person might share, “The apology seemed heartfelt, so I took it as genuine.”

21. Bit the bullet

This slang phrase means to accept or face a difficult or unpleasant situation, often with courage or determination. It is often used to describe someone who decides to do something difficult or take on a challenging task.

  • For example, “I didn’t want to go to the dentist, but I bit the bullet and made an appointment.”
  • In a conversation about overcoming fears, someone might say, “Sometimes you just have to bit the bullet and face your fears.”
  • A person discussing a tough decision might say, “I knew it was going to be hard, but I bit the bullet and chose what was best for me.”

22. Got on board

This slang phrase means to agree or accept a new idea, plan, or perspective. It is often used when someone initially had doubts or reservations but eventually comes around to support or embrace the idea.

  • For instance, “At first, I wasn’t sure about the new project, but after hearing more about it, I got on board.”
  • In a discussion about a team decision, someone might say, “It took some convincing, but eventually everyone got on board with the plan.”
  • A person describing a change of opinion might say, “I used to be skeptical, but I got on board with the new approach once I saw the results.”

23. Bought into it

This slang phrase means to believe or accept something, often without questioning or doubting it. It is often used to describe someone who fully embraces an idea, concept, or belief.

  • For example, “The salesman was so persuasive that I bought into his pitch and purchased the product.”
  • In a conversation about conspiracy theories, someone might say, “Some people are so quick to buy into wild claims without any evidence.”
  • A person describing their own gullibility might say, “I can’t believe I bought into that scam without doing any research.”

24. Accepted it

This phrase simply means to acknowledge or agree to something. It is a straightforward way to express that someone has accepted a fact, situation, or proposal.

  • For instance, “After much deliberation, I finally accepted the job offer.”
  • In a discussion about a decision, someone might say, “It took some time, but I eventually accepted the reality of the situation.”
  • A person describing their own journey might say, “It was hard at first, but I accepted that change was necessary for my growth.”

25. Embraced it

This phrase means to fully accept and welcome something, often with enthusiasm or open arms. It is used to describe someone who not only acknowledges or agrees with something but also embraces it wholeheartedly.

  • For example, “After trying different diets, I finally embraced a healthy lifestyle.”
  • In a conversation about personal growth, someone might say, “I’ve learned to embrace change and see it as an opportunity for growth.”
  • A person describing their passion might say, “I’ve always loved music, but I truly embraced it when I started playing in a band.”

26. Digested it

When someone says they “digested it,” they mean that they have fully understood and accepted something as true or valid.

  • For example, if someone explains a complex concept and asks if you understand, you might respond, “I’ve digested it and I’m ready to move on.”
  • A person might say, “After reading the article, I digested the information and formed my own opinion.”
  • In a conversation about a difficult decision, someone might say, “I’ve digested all the options and I think this is the best choice.”

27. Swore by it

When someone says they “swore by it,” they mean that they had complete faith in something and believed it to be true or effective.

  • For instance, if someone recommends a certain brand of skincare product and you trust their opinion, you might say, “I’ve tried it and I swear by it.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been using this method for years and I swear by it for getting a good night’s sleep.”
  • In a discussion about a particular diet plan, someone might say, “I followed it for a month and I swear by it for weight loss.”

28. Put faith in it

When someone says they “put faith in it,” they mean that they believed in something and trusted it to be true or reliable.

  • For example, if someone suggests a new workout routine and you trust their expertise, you might say, “I put faith in it and gave it a try.”
  • A person might say, “I put faith in this product and it has never let me down.”
  • In a conversation about a new technology, someone might say, “I put faith in this device and it has greatly improved my productivity.”

29. Trusted in it

When someone says they “trusted in it,” they mean that they relied on something with confidence and believed it to be dependable or true.

  • For instance, if someone recommends a certain brand of car and you trust their opinion, you might say, “I’ve owned it and trusted in it for years.”
  • A person might say, “I trusted in this method and it has always yielded positive results.”
  • In a discussion about a particular medication, someone might say, “I trusted in it and it helped alleviate my symptoms.”

30. Counted on it

When someone says they “counted on it,” they mean that they depended on something to be true or reliable and had confidence in it.

  • For example, if someone promises to meet you at a certain time and you trust their reliability, you might say, “I counted on it and arrived early.”
  • A person might say, “I counted on this product to deliver and it exceeded my expectations.”
  • In a conversation about a particular service, someone might say, “I counted on it and it never let me down.”

31. Leaned on it

This phrase is used to express a strong belief or reliance on something or someone. It implies that the person is counting on that thing or person to come through or be successful.

  • For example, “I really leaned on it when I decided to invest all my savings in that startup.”
  • In a conversation about a team’s chances in a sports game, someone might say, “We’re really leaning on our star player to lead us to victory.”
  • Another usage could be, “I’m leaning on it that my friend will help me move next weekend.”

32. Relied on it

This phrase is similar to “leaned on it” and is used to express a strong belief or dependence on something or someone. It indicates that the person is relying on that thing or person to fulfill a certain expectation or need.

  • For instance, “I relied on it that my car would start this morning, but it didn’t.”
  • In a discussion about a friend’s reliability, someone might say, “I can always rely on her to be there for me.”
  • Another usage could be, “I relied on it that my boss would give me a raise, but he didn’t come through.”

33. Banked on it

This phrase is used to indicate a strong belief or expectation that something will happen or be successful. It implies that the person has put all their hopes or confidence in that thing or outcome.

  • For example, “I really banked on it that my team would win the championship, but they lost.”
  • In a conversation about a job opportunity, someone might say, “I’m banking on it that I’ll get the promotion.”
  • Another usage could be, “I banked on it that my parents would support my decision, but they didn’t.”

34. Bet on it

This phrase is similar to “banked on it” and is used to express a strong belief or confidence in something. It implies that the person is willing to bet or risk something based on their belief in that thing or outcome.

  • For instance, “I bet on it that my favorite team would win the game, and they did.”
  • In a discussion about a business venture, someone might say, “I’m betting on it that this new product will be a huge success.”
  • Another usage could be, “I bet on it that my friend will be the first one to arrive at the party.”

35. Backed it

This phrase is used to indicate a strong belief or support for something or someone. It implies that the person is standing behind that thing or person and believes in its success or validity.

  • For example, “I backed it when my friend decided to quit their job and start their own business.”
  • In a conversation about a controversial opinion, someone might say, “I fully back it that everyone should have access to affordable healthcare.”
  • Another usage could be, “I backed it that my team would win the game, and they proved me right.”

36. Took as fact

When someone takes something as fact, they believe it to be true without any doubt or skepticism.

  • For example, “He took it as fact that the Earth is round.”
  • In a debate, someone might say, “I took his statement as fact until I found evidence to the contrary.”
  • A person might express their certainty by stating, “I took her explanation as fact because she’s an expert in the field.”

37. Took as reality

To take something as reality means to believe it to be true or real, often without questioning its validity.

  • For instance, “He took the dream as reality and was convinced it actually happened.”
  • In a fictional story, a character might say, “I took the magical world as reality and immersed myself in the story.”
  • Someone might express their strong belief by stating, “I took his explanation as reality because it made perfect sense.”

38. Took as genuine

To take something as genuine means to believe it to be authentic, sincere, or true.

  • For example, “She took his apology as genuine and forgave him.”
  • In a conversation about art, someone might say, “I took the painting as genuine because of the artist’s signature.”
  • A person might express their trust by stating, “I took his promise as genuine and have no doubts about his intentions.”

39. Took as authentic

When someone takes something as authentic, they believe it to be real, genuine, or true.

  • For instance, “He took the antique watch as authentic because of its craftsmanship.”
  • In a discussion about historical artifacts, someone might say, “I took the document as authentic based on the expert’s analysis.”
  • A person might express their certainty by stating, “I took her story as authentic because of the details she provided.”

40. Took as legitimate

To take something as legitimate means to believe it to be valid, genuine, or true.

  • For example, “He took the offer as legitimate and signed the contract.”
  • In a debate, someone might say, “I took his argument as legitimate until I heard counterarguments.”
  • A person might express their trust by stating, “I took their business proposal as legitimate because of their track record.”

41. Took as valid

When someone takes something as valid, it means they accept it as true or accurate. This slang phrase is often used to express belief in a statement or information.

  • For example, “I took his explanation as valid and didn’t question it.”
  • In a debate, someone might say, “I don’t take your argument as valid because it lacks evidence.”
  • A person might express doubt by saying, “I can’t take that claim as valid without further proof.”

42. Took as credible

When someone takes something as credible, it means they consider it believable or trustworthy. This slang phrase is often used to express confidence in the reliability of information.

  • For instance, “I took her advice as credible and followed it.”
  • In a news article, a journalist might write, “The witness testimonies were taken as credible evidence.”
  • A person might express skepticism by saying, “I can’t take his story as credible without corroboration.”

43. Took as reliable

When someone takes something as reliable, it means they regard it as trustworthy or dependable. This slang phrase is often used to express faith in the accuracy or consistency of something.

  • For example, “I took the source as reliable and used it in my research.”
  • In a product review, a customer might say, “I took the positive reviews as reliable indicators of the product’s quality.”
  • A person might express doubt by saying, “I can’t take their promises as reliable until they prove themselves.”

44. Took as trustworthy

When someone takes something as trustworthy, it means they consider it dependable or reliable. This slang phrase is often used to express confidence in the credibility or honesty of someone or something.

  • For instance, “I took his word as trustworthy and didn’t question it.”
  • In a conversation about a person’s character, someone might say, “I took her reputation as trustworthy and confided in her.”
  • A person might express skepticism by saying, “I can’t take their claims as trustworthy without evidence.”

45. Took as dependable

When someone takes something as dependable, it means they consider it reliable or trustworthy. This slang phrase is often used to express belief in the consistency or predictability of someone or something.

  • For example, “I took his support as dependable and knew he would be there for me.”
  • In a discussion about a car’s performance, someone might say, “I took the brand’s reputation as dependable and decided to purchase their vehicle.”
  • A person might express doubt by saying, “I can’t take their promises as dependable until they prove themselves.”

46. Took as honest

This phrase is used when someone believes that someone else is being honest or truthful in what they say or do.

  • For example, “I took his apology as honest and forgave him for his mistake.”
  • In a conversation about someone’s intentions, one might say, “I took her promise as honest, but she ended up breaking it.”
  • A person might express their trust by saying, “I took his words as honest and shared my deepest secret with him.”

47. Took as sincere

When someone takes something as sincere, it means they believe that the person or their actions are genuine and not meant to deceive or manipulate.

  • For instance, “I took her compliments as sincere and felt really appreciated.”
  • In a conversation about someone’s intentions, one might say, “I took his offer to help as sincere, but he never followed through.”
  • A person might express their trust by saying, “I took their apology as sincere and decided to give them another chance.”

48. Took as earnest

When someone takes something as earnest, it means they believe that the person is being serious and genuine in their intentions or actions.

  • For example, “I took his request for help as earnest and immediately offered my assistance.”
  • In a conversation about someone’s commitment, one might say, “I took her promise to change as earnest and supported her throughout the process.”
  • A person might express their trust by saying, “I took their commitment to the project as earnest and relied on their expertise.”

49. Took as heartfelt

When someone takes something as heartfelt, it means they believe that the person’s emotions or sentiments are genuine and deeply felt.

  • For instance, “I took her apology as heartfelt and could see the sincerity in her eyes.”
  • In a conversation about someone’s expression of love, one might say, “I took his words of affection as heartfelt and reciprocated with my own.”
  • A person might express their trust by saying, “I took their condolences as heartfelt and appreciated their support during my difficult time.”

50. Took as faithful

When someone takes something as faithful, it means they believe that the person will remain loyal and true to their word.

  • For example, “I took his promise to be faithful as a commitment to our relationship.”
  • In a conversation about someone’s trustworthiness, one might say, “I took her actions as faithful and trusted her with my secrets.”
  • A person might express their trust by saying, “I took their vow of loyalty as faithful and relied on their support in difficult times.”

51. Took as loyal

This phrase means to believe or accept someone as loyal or faithful. It implies that the person is trustworthy and can be relied upon.

  • For example, someone might say, “I took him as loyal and shared my deepest secrets with him.”
  • In a discussion about relationships, a person might say, “I took her as loyal, but she ended up betraying me.”
  • A friend might reassure another by saying, “You can take me as loyal. I’ll always have your back.”

52. Took as devoted

This phrase means to consider or view someone as devoted or dedicated. It implies that the person is committed and loyal to a cause or relationship.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I took her as devoted to her career, as she always puts in extra hours.”
  • In a conversation about friendships, a person might say, “I took him as devoted because he’s always there for me when I need him.”
  • A teacher might say to a student, “I took you as devoted to your studies, but your recent grades suggest otherwise.”

53. Drank the cool water

This phrase means to unquestioningly believe something or someone. It implies that the person accepts what they are told or what they see without any skepticism or doubt.

  • For example, someone might say, “He drank the cool water and believed everything the conspiracy theorist said.”
  • In a discussion about gullibility, a person might say, “She drank the cool water and fell for every scam that came her way.”
  • A parent might warn their child, “Don’t just drink the cool water. Question everything and think critically.”

54. Took the plunge

This phrase means to make a bold or daring belief or decision. It implies that the person is taking a risk by believing or committing to something.

  • For instance, someone might say, “After much consideration, I took the plunge and believed in my ability to start my own business.”
  • In a conversation about relationships, a person might say, “He took the plunge and believed in love again after a painful breakup.”
  • A friend might encourage another by saying, “Go ahead, take the plunge and believe in yourself. You have nothing to lose.”

55. Took the leap of faith

This phrase means to believe in something without any evidence or proof. It implies that the person is putting their trust and belief in something intangible or uncertain.

  • For example, someone might say, “She took the leap of faith and believed in the power of positive thinking.”
  • In a discussion about religion, a person might say, “Taking the leap of faith means believing in a higher power without tangible evidence.”
  • A motivational speaker might say, “Success often requires taking the leap of faith and believing in yourself, even when others doubt you.”

56. Hook, line, and sinker

This phrase is used to describe when someone believes something without any doubt or skepticism. It originates from fishing, where “hook, line, and sinker” refers to the complete swallowing of a fish baited on a hook.

  • For example, “He fell for the scam hook, line, and sinker.”
  • A person might say, “I told him a ridiculous story and he bought it hook, line, and sinker.”
  • In a conversation about gullibility, someone might comment, “She always falls for his lies hook, line, and sinker.”
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