Top 66 Slang For Brief – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to communicating concisely and effectively, having the right slang for “brief” can make all the difference. Whether you’re texting, emailing, or just trying to keep up with the latest trends, knowing the right words to use is key. Our team has put together a list of the most popular and trendy slang terms for “brief” that will have you speaking the language of the cool kids in no time. So, buckle up and get ready to upgrade your vocabulary game with these hip and snappy expressions!

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1. TL;DR

This acronym is used to summarize a lengthy piece of text or a complex topic. It indicates that the person did not read the entire content and is providing a brief summary or conclusion instead.

  • For instance, “TL;DR: The article discusses the impact of social media on mental health.”
  • In a Reddit thread, a user might comment, “TL;DR: OP is asking for advice on buying a new laptop.”
  • A person might use TL;DR in an email to summarize a long report, saying, “TL;DR: The report highlights the key findings and recommendations.”

2. Cliffs

Derived from the CliffsNotes brand of study guides, “cliffs” is used to refer to a condensed version of a longer piece of content or a summary of key points.

  • For example, “Can someone give me the cliffs of that article?”
  • In a discussion about a book, a person might say, “I read the cliffs before the exam.”
  • A student might ask a classmate, “Can you give me the cliffs on the lecture? I missed it.”

3. Recap

A recap is a concise summary or review of the main points or events of a particular topic or situation.

  • For instance, “Let’s start the meeting with a quick recap of last week’s progress.”
  • In a TV show review, a writer might say, “Here’s a recap of the latest episode.”
  • A sports commentator might provide a recap of a game, saying, “Let’s recap the highlights from tonight’s match.”

4. Sum-up

To sum up means to provide a brief overview or conclusion of something, usually in a concise and clear manner.

  • For example, “Before we end the presentation, let me sum up the key points.”
  • In a debate, a person might say, “To sum up my argument, we need stricter gun control laws.”
  • A teacher might ask a student, “Can you sum up the main events of the story?”

5. Rundown

A rundown refers to a brief and comprehensive summary or description of something, often providing all the essential details.

  • For instance, “Give me a quick rundown of what happened at the meeting.”
  • In a movie review, a critic might say, “Here’s a rundown of the plot and characters.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you give me a rundown of the party? I couldn’t make it.”

6. Synop

A shortened version or summary of something. “Synop” is a slang term for a brief summary or overview of a topic or story.

  • For example, a movie review might include a synop of the plot.
  • In a discussion about a book, someone might say, “Can you give me a synop of the main characters?”
  • A student might ask a classmate, “Hey, can I borrow your notes? I need a quick synop of what we covered in class.”

7. Lowdown

This term refers to the essential or most important information about a topic. “Lowdown” is a slang term for a brief and concise summary or explanation.

  • For instance, a friend might say, “Give me the lowdown on what happened at the party last night.”
  • In a business meeting, someone might ask, “Can you give me the lowdown on the current project status?”
  • A journalist might write, “Here’s the lowdown on the latest celebrity scandal.”

8. Capsule

A condensed or concise version of something. “Capsule” is a slang term for a brief summary or description that captures the essence of a topic.

  • For example, a travel website might provide a capsule of each destination.
  • In a discussion about a movie, someone might say, “I’ll give you a capsule review: it’s a must-watch.”
  • A fashion blogger might write, “Here’s a capsule of the latest trends for the upcoming season.”

9. Digest

To condense or summarize information. “Digest” is a slang term for a brief summary or overview of a topic or text.

  • For instance, a news website might provide a digest of the day’s top stories.
  • In a conversation about a long article, someone might say, “Can you give me a digest of the main points?”
  • A student might ask a classmate, “Can I borrow your notes? I need a quick digest of the lecture.”

10. Crib

A concise summary or collection of information. “Crib” is a slang term for a brief and handy reference or guide.

  • For example, a student might create a crib sheet for an upcoming exam.
  • In a discussion about a complex topic, someone might say, “I’ll give you a crib to help you understand.”
  • A coworker might ask, “Can you send me that crib you mentioned during the meeting?”

11. Cheat sheet

A “cheat sheet” is a concise and condensed document or set of notes that provides essential information or key points on a particular subject. It is used as a reference tool for quick and easy access to important details.

  • For example, a student might create a cheat sheet with formulas and key concepts for an upcoming exam.
  • In a work setting, someone might refer to a cheat sheet for a software program to quickly find shortcuts and commands.
  • A traveler might create a cheat sheet with basic phrases and translations for a foreign language they are learning.

12. Abbrev

Shortened form of a word or phrase. “Abbrev” is a slang term often used to refer to an abbreviation, especially in written communication or text messages.

  • For instance, in a text message, someone might write “OMG” as an abbrev for “Oh my God”.
  • In a discussion about computer science, a person might use “URL” as an abbrev for “Uniform Resource Locator”.
  • A person might say, “Let’s meet at 5 pm” as an abbrev for “Let’s meet at 5 o’clock in the afternoon”.

13. Deets

A shortened form of the word “details”. “Deets” is a slang term often used to refer to specific information or facts about a situation or event.

  • For example, someone might ask, “What are the deets of the party?”.
  • In a conversation about a movie, a person might say, “I don’t want to spoil it, but here are the deets of the plot”.
  • A friend might ask, “Give me the deets on your new job. What’s the salary, hours, and benefits?”.

14. Skinny

“Skinny” is a slang term that means having or providing detailed or inside information about something. It refers to knowing the essential or important facts about a particular situation or topic.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’ve got the skinny on the new restaurant opening in town. It’s owned by a famous chef”.
  • In a discussion about a celebrity scandal, a person might say, “Do you have the skinny on what really happened?”.
  • A friend might ask, “Give me the skinny on the upcoming concert. Are there any special guests?”.

15. Gist

The main or essential part of something. “Gist” refers to the general idea or the key points of a conversation, text, or situation.

  • For example, someone might say, “I didn’t read the whole article, but I got the gist of it from the first few paragraphs”.
  • In a meeting, a person might summarize a lengthy report by saying, “Here’s the gist of the findings: sales are down, but customer satisfaction is up”.
  • A friend might ask, “Can you give me the gist of what happened at the party? I couldn’t make it.”

16. Snapshot

A snapshot is a brief summary or overview of a situation or topic. It provides a quick and concise understanding of the main points.

  • For example, in a business meeting, someone might say, “Let’s start with a snapshot of our current sales figures.”
  • In a news article, the headline might read, “Here’s a snapshot of the latest developments in the stock market.”
  • A teacher might ask students to provide a snapshot of a book they read, saying, “Give me a snapshot of the main characters and plot.”

17. Overview

An overview is a general summary or broad outline of a subject or topic. It provides a high-level understanding without going into too much detail.

  • For instance, when introducing a new project, a manager might give an overview of the goals and objectives.
  • In a presentation, a speaker might provide an overview of the key points to be discussed.
  • A travel website might offer an overview of a destination, including popular attractions and activities.
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18. Quickie

A quickie refers to a brief or short-lived experience or encounter. It implies that something was done quickly or without much time or effort.

  • For example, in a romantic context, someone might say, “We had a quickie before work.”
  • In a work setting, a colleague might ask for a quickie meeting to discuss a specific issue.
  • A journalist might write, “I had a quickie interview with the celebrity before their performance.”

19. Shorty

Shorty is a slang term often used to refer to a person who is short in height. It is typically used in a light-hearted or affectionate manner.

  • For instance, a friend might say, “Hey, shorty, how’s it going?”
  • In a playful conversation, someone might tease, “Watch out, shorty, I can see over your head!”
  • A parent might say to their child, “Come here, shorty, let me give you a hug.”

20. Snippet

A snippet is a small piece or extract of something larger. It can refer to a short passage of text, a fragment of a song, or a portion of code.

  • For example, when sharing a blog post, someone might include a snippet of the article to entice readers.
  • In a music review, a critic might quote a snippet of the lyrics to highlight a particular theme.
  • A programmer might share a snippet of code to demonstrate a specific function or technique.

21. Cliffsnotes

Cliffsnotes is a term used to describe a concise summary or overview of a longer piece of content, such as a book or article. It is often used to refer to a shortened version that highlights the key points.

  • For example, a student might say, “I didn’t have time to read the whole book, so I just read the Cliffsnotes.”
  • In a discussion about a complex topic, someone might ask, “Can someone give me the Cliffsnotes version?”
  • A person sharing a review might mention, “Here’s the Cliffsnotes version for those who don’t want to read the whole article.”

22. Abridged

Abridged refers to something that has been shortened or condensed, typically to make it more concise or easier to understand. It is often used to describe a version of a longer work that includes only the most important or essential parts.

  • For instance, a movie adaptation of a book might be described as an abridged version of the story.
  • In a discussion about a long speech, someone might say, “Can you give us an abridged version?”
  • A person summarizing a lengthy document might mention, “Here’s an abridged version for those who don’t have time to read the whole thing.”

23. Abstract

Abstract is a term used to describe a brief summary or overview of a longer piece of content, such as a research paper or academic article. It is often used to provide a concise description of the main points or findings.

  • For example, a scientist might write an abstract to give an overview of their research before presenting the full paper.
  • In a discussion about a complex topic, someone might ask, “Can you provide an abstract of the article?”
  • A person sharing a scholarly paper might mention, “Here’s the abstract for those who want a quick overview.”

24. Briefing

A briefing is a term used to describe a concise presentation or session in which information or instructions are given. It is often used in a professional or military context to provide updates or inform participants about a specific topic.

  • For instance, before a mission, soldiers might receive a briefing on the objectives and risks involved.
  • In a business setting, a manager might conduct a briefing to update their team on the latest developments.
  • A person organizing a conference might mention, “There will be a briefing session for all attendees before the event.”

25. Essence

Essence refers to the fundamental or most important aspect of something. It is often used to describe the key or essential elements that capture the essence or spirit of a larger concept or idea.

  • For example, a person might say, “The essence of the book is about finding happiness in simplicity.”
  • In a discussion about a complex theory, someone might ask, “What’s the essence of this concept?”
  • A person summarizing a philosophical argument might mention, “Here’s the essence of the author’s viewpoint.”

26. Quick rundown

A brief summary or overview of a topic or situation. It provides essential information without going into detail.

  • For example, if someone asks for a quick rundown of a movie, you might say, “It’s a romantic comedy about two people who meet on a train and fall in love.”
  • In a business meeting, a colleague might give a quick rundown of the agenda, saying, “First, we’ll discuss the budget, then move on to marketing.”
  • A teacher might give a quick rundown of the day’s lesson plan, stating, “We’ll start with a review of yesterday’s material, then move on to a new concept.”

27. Short version

A concise explanation or summary of something that omits unnecessary details.

  • For instance, if someone asks for a short version of a book, you might say, “It’s a coming-of-age story set in a small town.”
  • In a conversation about a complicated scientific theory, someone might provide a short version, saying, “It’s all about the interaction of energy and matter.”
  • A presenter might give a short version of a lengthy report, stating, “In conclusion, our findings show a positive correlation between exercise and mental health.”

28. Quick look

A brief and cursory examination or observation of something.

  • For example, if someone asks for a quick look at a document, you might say, “I’ll just take a quick look and let you know.”
  • In a fashion magazine, a stylist might provide a quick look at the latest trends, saying, “Here’s a quick look at what’s hot this season.”
  • A reviewer might give a quick look at a new movie, stating, “I only had time for a quick look, but it seems like a promising film.”

29. Quick peek

A quick and brief glimpse or peek at something, often to satisfy curiosity or get a general idea.

  • For instance, if someone asks for a quick peek at a photo, you might say, “Here’s a quick peek at the sunset I captured.”
  • In a discussion about an upcoming product launch, someone might provide a quick peek, saying, “Here’s a quick peek at the packaging design.”
  • A friend might give you a quick peek at their vacation photos, stating, “Here’s a quick peek at some of the highlights from my trip.”

30. Quick glance

A brief and casual look at something, often to get a general impression or confirm something.

  • For example, if someone asks for a quick glance at a report, you might say, “I’ll just take a quick glance and see if there are any major issues.”
  • In a discussion about a new artwork, someone might provide a quick glance, saying, “Here’s a quick glance at the artist’s portfolio.”
  • A colleague might give a quick glance at their calendar, stating, “Let me take a quick glance and see if I’m available for that meeting.”

31. Quick view

This term stands for “Too Long; Didn’t Read” and is used to summarize a lengthy piece of information or content in a concise manner. “Quick view” is a similar phrase that implies a brief or cursory look at something.

  • For example, a person might comment on a long article, “Can you give me a TL;DR?”
  • In a discussion about a complex topic, someone might say, “Here’s a quick view of the main points.”
  • A user might ask, “Can someone provide a quick view of the book’s plot?”

32. Quick read

This term refers to reading something quickly or at a fast pace. It implies the ability to consume written content in a short amount of time.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I’m going to do a quick read of this article before the meeting.”
  • In a book club discussion, someone might mention, “I did a speed read of the novel to catch up.”
  • A student might say, “I have a lot of material to cover, so I’ll have to do a quick read of the textbook.”

33. Quick scan

To “quick scan” or “skim” something means to glance over it quickly or read it superficially to get a general idea of the content without going into detail.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m just going to do a quick scan of this report to see if there’s anything important.”
  • In a discussion about research papers, someone might mention, “I usually skim through the abstract and conclusion for a quick scan of the study.”
  • A student might say, “I don’t have time to read the entire chapter, so I’ll just do a quick scan of the headings and subheadings.”

34. Quick review

To “quick review” or “recap” something means to briefly go over it again, especially to refresh one’s memory or summarize the main points.

  • For instance, a person might say, “Let’s do a quick review of what we covered in the last meeting.”
  • In a discussion about a movie, someone might mention, “I’ll give you a quick review of the plot so you know what it’s about.”
  • A teacher might say, “Before the exam, I’ll do a quick review of the key concepts.”

35. Quick summary

A “quick summary” or “cliff notes” refers to a brief and condensed version of a longer piece of content or information. It provides a concise overview of the main points or highlights.

  • For example, a person might say, “Can you give me a quick summary of the book?”
  • In a discussion about a movie, someone might mention, “Here’s a cliff notes version of the plot.”
  • A student might say, “I’ll just read the quick summary instead of the entire article.”

36. Quick outline

A brief summary or overview of a topic or subject. It provides a general idea of the main points or structure.

  • For example, “Can you give me a quick outline of your presentation?”
  • In a meeting, someone might say, “Let’s start with a quick outline of the agenda.”
  • A teacher might ask, “Can you provide a quick outline of the chapter we just covered?”

37. Quick abstract

A concise summary or overview of a document, article, or research paper. It highlights the main points or findings without going into detail.

  • For instance, “I need a quick abstract of this research paper for my presentation.”
  • A student might say, “I always read the abstract before deciding to read the full article.”
  • A researcher might write, “The abstract provides a quick overview of the study’s methodology and results.”

38. Quick snapshot

A brief overview or snapshot of a situation, project, or data. It gives a quick glimpse or summary of the essential information or key points.

  • For example, “Can you give me a quick snapshot of the project’s progress?”
  • In a business presentation, someone might say, “Let’s start with a quick snapshot of the market trends.”
  • A manager might ask, “Can you provide a quick snapshot of the sales figures for this month?”

39. Quick briefing

A concise summary or briefing on a particular topic or situation. It provides essential information or updates in a short amount of time.

  • For instance, “I need a quick briefing on the current state of the project.”
  • A military officer might say, “Give me a quick briefing on the enemy’s movements.”
  • A manager might ask, “Can you provide a quick briefing on the new company policies?”

40. Quick essence

The core or essential elements of a concept, idea, or argument. It captures the main points or essence in a concise manner.

  • For example, “Can you give me the quick essence of your proposal?”
  • In a philosophical discussion, someone might say, “Let’s focus on the quick essence of the argument.”
  • A writer might summarize, “The quick essence of the novel lies in its exploration of human nature and morality.”

41. Cliffnotes

Cliffnotes is a term that refers to a concise summary or overview of a longer piece of written work, such as a book or article. It is often used when someone wants to quickly understand the main points or key takeaways without reading the entire work.

  • For example, a student might say, “I didn’t have time to read the whole novel, so I just read the Cliffnotes.”
  • In a discussion about a complex academic paper, someone might ask, “Does anyone have the Cliffnotes version?”
  • A person might use the term in a casual conversation, saying, “Can you give me the Cliffnotes on that article you read?”

42. Sparknotes

Sparknotes is a popular brand of study guides that provide summaries, analysis, and other helpful information about various literary works, including books, plays, and poems. The term “Sparknotes” is often used to refer to any type of study guide or condensed version of a text.

  • For instance, a student might say, “I didn’t understand the book, so I looked up the Sparknotes.”
  • In a discussion about a challenging play, someone might ask, “Has anyone read the Sparknotes for that Shakespearean tragedy?”
  • A person might recommend Sparknotes to a friend, saying, “If you’re struggling with the novel, check out the Sparknotes for a clearer understanding.”

43. Blurb

Blurb is a term that refers to a short and catchy description or summary of a book, movie, or other creative work. It is often used on the back cover of a book or in promotional materials to entice potential readers or viewers.

  • For example, a person might read the blurb of a novel and decide whether or not to buy it.
  • In a conversation about movies, someone might say, “I saw the blurb for that film and it looks interesting.”
  • A person might use the term in a review, saying, “The blurb on the back of the book doesn’t do justice to the depth of the story.”

44. Outline

Outline is a term that refers to a plan or summary of the main points or structure of a piece of writing or presentation. It is often used as a tool to organize thoughts and ideas before starting the actual writing process.

  • For instance, a student might create an outline before writing an essay to ensure a logical flow of ideas.
  • In a discussion about a complex project, someone might ask, “Do you have an outline of how you’re going to approach it?”
  • A person might use the term in a professional setting, saying, “Let’s create an outline of the presentation to make sure we cover all the important points.”

45. Sketch

Sketch is a term that refers to a rough or preliminary version or draft of a piece of artwork, design, or written work. It is often used to capture initial ideas or concepts before refining them into a more polished final product.

  • For example, an artist might create a sketch of a painting before starting the actual work.
  • In a discussion about a new product, someone might ask, “Do you have any sketches of the design?”
  • A person might use the term in a creative writing context, saying, “I’m still working on the story, but here’s a sketch of the plot so far.”

46. Summation

A concise statement or overview of the main points or key information.

  • For example, “Can you give a quick summation of the meeting?”
  • In a legal context, a lawyer might say, “I will now provide a summation of the evidence.”
  • A teacher might ask students to write a summation of a book they read.
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47. Recapit

To provide a summary or review of something that has already been discussed or happened.

  • For instance, “Can you recap what we covered in the last class?”
  • After a sports game, a commentator might say, “Let’s recap the highlights of the match.”
  • A TV show might have a segment called “Recap” where they summarize previous episodes.

48. Summarize

To give a brief account of the main points or key details.

  • For example, “Can you summarize the main arguments of the article?”
  • In a meeting, a participant might say, “Let me summarize what we’ve discussed so far.”
  • A student might be asked to summarize a chapter of a textbook.

49. Condense

To make something more concise or compact by removing unnecessary details or information.

  • For instance, “Can you condense this 10-page report into a one-page summary?”
  • A writer might be asked to condense their article for a shorter publication.
  • A teacher might explain, “You need to condense your essay to meet the word limit.”

50. Précis

A concise summary or abstract of a longer piece of written work.

  • For example, “Please provide a précis of the research paper.”
  • In academic writing, a précis is often used to summarize a complex article.
  • A book review might include a précis of the plot before offering an analysis.

51. Thumbnail

A thumbnail is a small, concise summary or preview of a larger piece of content. It provides a quick overview or snapshot of the main points or highlights.

  • For example, a news article might have a thumbnail that includes the headline, a brief description, and an image.
  • In a video-sharing platform, a thumbnail is the small image that represents the video and gives viewers an idea of what to expect.
  • A blogger might create a thumbnail for their blog post to entice readers and give them a glimpse of what the post is about.
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52. Roundup

A roundup is a compilation or collection of various pieces of information, often presented in a concise and summarized format. It brings together different sources or elements into one comprehensive overview.

  • For instance, a news website might have a weekly roundup of top headlines or a roundup of the latest sports scores.
  • A food blogger might do a roundup of their favorite recipes for a specific season or holiday.
  • A fashion magazine might publish a roundup of the latest trends for the upcoming season.

53. Synthesis

Synthesis refers to the process of combining or integrating different elements, ideas, or information to create a cohesive whole. It involves analyzing and merging various components to form a comprehensive understanding or presentation.

  • For example, in an academic paper, a synthesis of different research studies might be presented to support a particular argument or conclusion.
  • In a business context, a synthesis of market research and consumer feedback might be used to develop a new product or marketing strategy.
  • A music producer might use synthesis to combine different sounds and instruments into a harmonious composition.

54. Abbreviated

Abbreviated means shortened or condensed. It refers to a form or version of something that is shorter or more concise than the original.

  • For instance, an abbreviated version of a book might be a summary or abridged edition that covers the main points.
  • In a text message or chat conversation, someone might use abbreviations or acronyms to convey a message more quickly.
  • A presentation might include an abbreviated version of a longer report to provide a quick overview to the audience.

55. Compendium

A compendium is a collection or compilation of information, ideas, or knowledge on a specific topic. It brings together various sources or resources into one comprehensive volume or document.

  • For example, a compendium of recipes might include a wide range of dishes from different cuisines.
  • In the field of medicine, a compendium of drugs might provide detailed information on various medications.
  • A compendium of historical events might cover significant events from different time periods and regions.

56. Capsulize

To capsulize means to summarize or condense something into a brief and concise form.

  • For example, a news article might capsulize a long report into a few key points.
  • In a conversation about a book, someone might say, “Can you capsulize the plot for me?”
  • A presenter might use visuals to capsulize complex information for the audience.

57. Crib notes

Crib notes are a set of condensed notes or cheat sheets that provide a quick reference or summary of important information.

  • For instance, a student might use crib notes to study for an exam.
  • In a meeting, someone might discreetly glance at their crib notes to remember key points.
  • A presenter might create crib notes to help them stay on track during a speech.

58. Sum

To sum something means to provide a brief and concise summary or overview.

  • For example, a manager might ask an employee to sum up their project in a few sentences.
  • In a discussion about a movie, someone might say, “Give me a sum of the plot.”
  • A journalist might write a sum of a news article to capture the main points.

59. Potted version

The potted version refers to a condensed or abbreviated version of something, often used to provide a quick summary or overview.

  • For instance, a book might have a potted version on the back cover.
  • In a conversation about a long article, someone might say, “Give me the potted version.”
  • A presenter might provide a potted version of their talk to give the audience an overview.

60. Coles Notes

Coles Notes are a series of study guides that provide concise summaries and analysis of literary works, often used by students as a quick reference.

  • For example, a student might use Coles Notes to understand a complex novel.
  • In a discussion about a play, someone might say, “I read the Coles Notes to get a quick understanding.”
  • A teacher might recommend Coles Notes as a supplementary resource for students.

61. Short and sweet

This phrase is used to describe something that is brief and to the point, without unnecessary details or elaboration.

  • For example, “Can you give me a short and sweet summary of the meeting?”
  • In a discussion about a book, someone might say, “The author’s writing style is short and sweet, making it an easy read.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “Keep your answers short and sweet on the exam.”

62. In a nutshell

This phrase is used to indicate a concise and summarized version of something, usually a complex concept or idea.

  • For instance, “Can you explain the theory of relativity in a nutshell?”
  • A person might describe a movie by saying, “In a nutshell, it’s about a group of friends who go on a road trip.”
  • In a presentation, someone might say, “Let me give you the project update in a nutshell.”

63. To the point

This phrase is used to describe someone or something that communicates or acts in a direct and concise manner, without unnecessary details or digressions.

  • For example, “I appreciate that you always get straight to the point in our conversations.”
  • In a business meeting, someone might say, “Let’s keep our discussion to the point and avoid going off-topic.”
  • A manager might give feedback to an employee, saying, “Your report needs to be more to the point and focused on the key findings.”

64. Bottom line

This phrase refers to the most important or essential information or conclusion of a discussion or situation.

  • For instance, “What’s the bottom line of the financial report?”
  • A person might say, “The bottom line is that we need to increase sales to meet our targets.”
  • In a debate, someone might argue, “The bottom line is that climate change is a pressing issue that requires immediate action.”

65. Quick and dirty

This phrase is used to describe a fast and efficient approach or solution, often without much attention to details or thoroughness.

  • For example, “We need to come up with a quick and dirty solution to fix this issue.”
  • In a cooking tutorial, someone might say, “This recipe is a quick and dirty way to make a delicious meal.”
  • A project manager might ask their team, “Can we do a quick and dirty analysis to determine the feasibility of this idea?”

66. Reader’s Digest version

This phrase is used to refer to a concise and condensed version of something, often used when summarizing a longer piece of information or story. It originates from the Reader’s Digest magazine, which is known for publishing condensed versions of articles.

  • For example, “Can you give me the Reader’s Digest version of what happened?”
  • In a meeting, someone might say, “Let’s skip the details and give me the Reader’s Digest version.”
  • When explaining a complex concept, a person might say, “Here’s the Reader’s Digest version to help you understand it better.”