Top 40 Slang For Brother In Spanish – Meaning & Usage

In Spanish culture, family is deeply valued and cherished, and the word for “brother” holds a special place. But did you know that there are various slang terms used to refer to a brother in Spanish? Whether you’re a native Spanish speaker looking to expand your vocabulary or a language enthusiast eager to learn some cool slang, this listicle is for you! We’ve gathered the top slang terms for brother in Spanish that you need to know to sound like a true insider. Get ready to impress your amigos with these fun and colorful expressions!

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1. Hermano

The word “hermano” translates to “brother” in English. It is a common term used to refer to a male sibling or a close male friend.

  • For example, “Mi hermano mayor me enseñó a andar en bicicleta” (My older brother taught me how to ride a bicycle).
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “Hola, hermano, ¿cómo estás?” (Hey, brother, how are you?).
  • When expressing affection, one might say, “Te quiero mucho, hermano” (I love you a lot, brother).

2. Manito

The word “manito” is a diminutive form of “mano,” which means “hand” in English. In Spanish slang, it is often used to refer to a younger brother or a close male friend in an endearing way.

  • For instance, “Mi manito y yo jugamos fútbol juntos” (My little brother and I play soccer together).
  • In a playful tone, someone might say, “¡Ven aquí, manito!” (Come here, little brother!).
  • When expressing affection or camaraderie, one might say, “Eres mi mejor amigo, manito” (You’re my best friend, little brother).

3. Parcero

The word “parcero” is a Colombian slang term that is commonly used to refer to a close friend or a brother-like figure. It is derived from the word “parce,” which means “friend” in Colombian Spanish.

  • For example, “Voy a salir con mis parceros esta noche” (I’m going out with my buddies tonight).
  • In a friendly conversation, someone might say, “¿Qué más, parcero?” (What’s up, buddy?).
  • When expressing solidarity or support, one might say, “Cuenta conmigo, parcero” (Count on me, buddy).

4. Compadre

The word “compadre” is a Spanish term that originally referred to the godfather of one’s child. However, it is now commonly used to refer to a close friend or a brother-like figure in a casual and friendly manner.

  • For instance, “Mi compadre y yo vamos a ver el partido juntos” (My pal and I are going to watch the game together).
  • In a jovial conversation, someone might say, “¡Hola, compadre! ¿Cómo estás?” (Hey, pal! How are you?).
  • When expressing camaraderie or shared experiences, one might say, “Somos compadres de la vida” (We’re pals for life).

5. Bro

The word “bro” is an English slang term that has been adopted in Spanish as well. It is used to refer to a close male friend or a brother-like figure in a casual and familiar way.

  • For example, “Voy a salir con mis bros esta noche” (I’m going out with my bros tonight).
  • In a laid-back conversation, someone might say, “¿Qué pasa, bro?” (What’s up, bro?).
  • When expressing a sense of camaraderie or shared interests, one might say, “Eres mi bro de confianza” (You’re my trusted bro).

6. Broder

This term is a variation of the word “brother” and is often used as a slang term for brother in Spanish. It is commonly used in informal settings or among friends.

  • For example, a person might say, “Hey broder, can you hand me that tool?”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might ask, “How’s your broder doing?”
  • A group of friends might greet each other with, “What’s up, broder?”

7. Brody

This term is another variation of the word “brother” and is used as a slang term for brother in Spanish. It is often used in a casual or friendly manner.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Hey Brody, are you coming to the party tonight?”
  • In a group of friends, one person might ask, “Where’s Brody? I haven’t seen him in a while.”
  • Two siblings might refer to each other as “Brody” when talking to their friends.

8. Broham

This term is a slang word derived from combining “brother” and “ham” and is used as a slang term for brother in Spanish. It is often used in a friendly or informal context.

  • For example, someone might say, “What’s up, broham? Ready to hit the beach?”
  • In a group of friends, one person might ask, “Broham, can you lend me some cash?”
  • Two friends might greet each other with, “Hey broham, long time no see!”

9. Broseph

This term is a slang word derived from combining “brother” and “Joseph” and is used as a slang term for brother in Spanish. It is often used in a casual or friendly manner.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Hey broseph, wanna grab some pizza?”
  • In a group of friends, one person might say, “Broseph, you’re always there for me.”
  • Two siblings might use “broseph” affectionately when talking to each other.

10. Broseidon

This term is a slang word derived from combining “brother” and the Greek god “Poseidon” and is used as a slang term for brother in Spanish. It is often used in a playful or humorous way.

  • For example, someone might say, “What’s up, broseidon? Ready for some adventure?”
  • In a group of friends, one person might exclaim, “Broseidon, you’re the best!”
  • Two friends might jokingly refer to each other as “broseidon” to lighten the mood.
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11. Brozilla

This term is a combination of “brother” and “zilla,” referencing the large and powerful monster Godzilla. It is used to affectionately refer to an older brother or a brother figure who is protective and strong.

  • For example, a younger sibling might say, “I always feel safe when Brozilla is around.”
  • In a group of friends, someone might introduce their older brother by saying, “This is my Brozilla, he’s always got my back.”
  • A person might describe their relationship with their older brother by saying, “We have a Brozilla bond, he’s like a guardian to me.”

12. Bromigo

This term combines “brother” and “amigo,” which means friend in Spanish. It is used to refer to a close male friend who is like a brother to you. It emphasizes the strong bond and camaraderie between friends.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m going out with my bromigos tonight, it’s always a good time.”
  • In a conversation about friendship, someone might say, “My bromigo has been there for me through thick and thin.”
  • A person might introduce their best friend by saying, “This is my bromigo, we’ve known each other since childhood.”

13. Bromance

This term is a combination of “brother” and “romance,” and it refers to a close, non-sexual friendship between two men. It emphasizes the deep emotional bond and affection between friends who are like brothers to each other.

  • For example, someone might say, “Their bromance is so strong, they’re practically inseparable.”
  • In a discussion about friendship, someone might say, “A bromance is a special kind of bond that not everyone gets to experience.”
  • A person might describe their friendship by saying, “We have a bromance going on, we understand each other on a different level.”

14. Brochacho

This term is a combination of “brother” and “macho,” which means masculine or tough in Spanish. It is used to describe a brother or a male friend who is cool, confident, and exhibits traditionally masculine qualities.

  • For instance, someone might say, “My brochacho always knows how to have a good time.”
  • In a conversation about friendship, someone might say, “He’s not just a friend, he’s a brochacho.”
  • A person might introduce their stylish and confident brother by saying, “This is my brochacho, he’s the life of the party.”

15. Broheim

This term combines “brother” and “heim,” a play on the suffix “-heim” found in some German surnames, meaning “home” or “place.” It is used to refer to a brother who is not only family but also a close friend and companion.

  • For example, someone might say, “I can always count on my broheim to have my back.”
  • In a discussion about sibling relationships, someone might say, “Having a broheim is like having a built-in best friend.”
  • A person might introduce their brother to a friend by saying, “This is my broheim, we’ve been through everything together.”

16. Brosef

This term is a play on the English word “bro” and the name “Joseph.” It is used to refer to a close male friend or brother-like figure.

  • For example, “Hey brosef, let’s grab some pizza tonight.”
  • In a group of friends, one might say, “Brosef, can I borrow your car for a bit?”
  • Someone might introduce their friend by saying, “This is my brosef, we’ve known each other since childhood.”

17. Hermanito

This term is a diminutive form of the Spanish word “hermano,” which means “brother.” It is used to refer to a younger brother or a brother-like figure.

  • For instance, “My hermanito always looks up to me for advice.”
  • In a family gathering, someone might say, “Hermanito, can you pass me the salt?”
  • A person might talk about their childhood memories, saying, “I used to play video games with my hermanito all the time.”

18. Cuate

This term is commonly used in Mexico to refer to a close friend or buddy. It can also be used to refer to a brother-like figure.

  • For example, “Hey cuate, let’s go catch a movie tonight.”
  • In a conversation about plans, someone might say, “I’m meeting up with my cuates later.”
  • Two friends might greet each other by saying, “¡Qué onda, cuate!”

19. Wey

This term originated in Mexico and is commonly used among friends to refer to each other. It can also be used to refer to a brother-like figure.

  • For instance, “Hey wey, did you watch the game last night?”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “Wey, let’s go grab some tacos.”
  • Two friends might tease each other by saying, “What’s up, wey? You’re always late!”

20. Colega

This term is used in Spain and Latin America to refer to a close friend or colleague. It can also be used to refer to a brother-like figure.

  • For example, “Hey colega, let’s go for a drink after work.”
  • In a professional setting, someone might say, “My colega and I have been working on this project together.”
  • Two friends might greet each other by saying, “¡Hola, colega! ¿Cómo estás?”

21. Amigo

While not a direct translation for “brother,” “amigo” is often used as a term of endearment or familiarity to refer to a close friend. It can be used to convey a sense of brotherhood or camaraderie.

  • For example, one might say, “¡Hola, amigo! ¿Qué tal?” (Hello, friend! How are you?)
  • In a conversation about a close group of friends, someone might say, “Somos más que amigos, somos como hermanos” (We are more than friends, we are like brothers).
  • When expressing gratitude towards a friend, one might say, “Gracias, amigo” (Thank you, friend).
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22. Hermano de corazón

This phrase is used to describe someone who is not biologically or legally a brother, but is considered as such due to a strong bond or close relationship. It emphasizes the emotional connection and loyalty between individuals.

  • For instance, one might say, “Eres mi hermano de corazón” (You are my brother from the heart) to express deep affection and trust towards a close friend.
  • In a conversation about chosen family, someone might say, “Mis amigos son mis hermanos de corazón” (My friends are my brothers from the heart).
  • When describing a lifelong friendship, one might say, “Nos conocemos desde niños, somos hermanos de corazón” (We have known each other since childhood, we are brothers from the heart).

23. Hermano mayor

This term is used to refer to an older brother. It highlights the age and hierarchical relationship between siblings, with the “hermano mayor” typically seen as a figure of authority or guidance.

  • For example, one might say, “Mi hermano mayor me enseñó a andar en bicicleta” (My older brother taught me how to ride a bike).
  • In a conversation about family dynamics, someone might say, “Como hermano mayor, siempre he sentido la responsabilidad de cuidar a mis hermanos menores” (As an older brother, I have always felt the responsibility to take care of my younger siblings).
  • When reminiscing about childhood memories, one might say, “Recuerdo cuando mi hermano mayor me protegía en la escuela” (I remember when my older brother used to protect me at school).

24. Hermano menor

This term is used to refer to a younger brother. It emphasizes the age and hierarchical relationship between siblings, with the “hermano menor” often seen as the one who needs guidance and protection.

  • For instance, one might say, “Mi hermano menor siempre me sigue a todas partes” (My younger brother always follows me everywhere).
  • In a conversation about sibling rivalry, someone might say, “Mi hermano menor siempre quiere competir conmigo” (My younger brother always wants to compete with me).
  • When describing the bond between siblings, one might say, “A pesar de nuestras peleas, amo a mi hermano menor” (Despite our fights, I love my younger brother).

25. Cuñado

While not a direct translation for “brother,” “cuñado” is the term used to refer to one’s brother-in-law. It is used to denote the relationship between a person’s spouse or partner and their sibling’s spouse or partner.

  • For example, one might say, “Mi cuñado es muy simpático” (My brother-in-law is very nice).
  • In a conversation about family gatherings, someone might say, “Voy a visitar a mi cuñado este fin de semana” (I am going to visit my brother-in-law this weekend).
  • When talking about extended family, one might say, “Mis cuñados son como mis hermanos” (My brothers-in-law are like my brothers).

26. Hermanastro

This term refers to a brother who is not biologically related, but is instead the son of one’s stepparent. It is commonly used to distinguish between a brother who shares both parents and a brother who does not.

  • For example, “My hermanastro and I have different fathers, but we still consider each other family.”
  • In a conversation about blended families, someone might say, “I have two hermanastros from my mom’s second marriage.”
  • A person introducing their family might say, “This is my hermanastro, Juan. We’ve been close since our parents got married.”

27. Mano

This term is a colloquial way of referring to a brother, similar to how “bro” is used in English. It is often used among friends or in informal settings.

  • For instance, “Hey, mano! How’s it going?”
  • In a conversation about siblings, someone might say, “I have two manos, one older and one younger.”
  • A person introducing their brother to a friend might say, “This is my mano, Miguel. He’s always got my back.”

28. Compa

This term is a shortened form of “compañero” and is used to refer to a close friend or companion. It can also be used to refer to a brother in a friendly or informal manner.

  • For example, “Hey, compa! Let’s grab a drink.”
  • In a conversation about childhood, someone might say, “My compa and I used to get into all sorts of mischief.”
  • A person introducing their brother to a group might say, “Everyone, this is my compa, Carlos. We’ve been through thick and thin together.”

29. Carnal

This term is derived from the Spanish word for “flesh” and is used to refer to a brother in a familial sense. It emphasizes the bond and closeness between siblings.

  • For instance, “I love my carnal. We’ve always been there for each other.”
  • In a conversation about family dynamics, someone might say, “My carnal and I have a strong connection, even though we’re very different.”
  • A person talking about their childhood might say, “Growing up, my carnal and I were inseparable.”

30. Pata

This term is a colloquial way of referring to a friend or companion, similar to how “pal” is used in English. While it is not specifically used to refer to a brother, it can be used in a friendly or informal context.

  • For example, “Hey, pata! Let’s go grab some lunch.”
  • In a conversation about friendship, someone might say, “My pata and I have known each other since we were kids.”
  • A person introducing their brother to a new friend might say, “This is my pata, Javier. We’ve been through a lot together.”

31. Camarada

This term is often used to refer to a close friend or companion, similar to the English word “comrade.” It can also be used to refer to a brother in a figurative sense.

  • For example, “Hola, camarada, ¿cómo estás?” (Hello, comrade, how are you?)
  • In a group of friends, someone might say, “Este es mi camarada, Juan” (This is my comrade, Juan).
  • In a conversation about loyalty, someone might say, “Mi hermano es mi camarada” (My brother is my comrade).
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32. Chavo

This term is commonly used in Mexico to refer to a young boy or kid, but it can also be used to refer to a brother, especially in a casual or friendly context.

  • For instance, “Mi chavo menor es mi mejor amigo” (My younger brother is my best friend).
  • In a conversation about family, someone might say, “Tengo dos chavos, un hermano mayor y un hermano menor” (I have two brothers, an older brother and a younger brother).
  • In a playful tone, someone might say, “¡Ese es mi chavo!” (That’s my brother!).

33. Primo

While “primo” technically means cousin in Spanish, it is often used in a broader sense to refer to a close friend or buddy, similar to the English word “bro.” It can also be used to refer to a brother, especially in Latin American countries.

  • For example, “¡Hola, primo! ¿Cómo estás?” (Hi, bro! How are you?)
  • In a conversation about family, someone might say, “Tengo tres primos, dos hermanos y una hermana” (I have three cousins, two brothers, and one sister).
  • In a group of friends, someone might say, “¡Mis primos son mis hermanos!” (My cousins are my brothers!).

34. Panita

This term is commonly used in Venezuela to refer to a close friend or buddy, similar to the English word “buddy.” It can also be used to refer to a brother in a casual or friendly context.

  • For instance, “Voy a salir con mis panitas esta noche” (I’m going out with my buddies tonight).
  • In a conversation about family, someone might say, “Mi panita mayor siempre está ahí para mí” (My older brother is always there for me).
  • In a playful tone, someone might say, “¡Ese es mi panita!” (That’s my brother!).

35. Maje

This term is commonly used in Central America, particularly in El Salvador and Honduras, to refer to a friend or buddy, similar to the English word “dude.” It can also be used to refer to a brother in a casual or friendly context.

  • For example, “¿Qué pasa, maje?” (What’s up, dude?)
  • In a conversation about family, someone might say, “Mi maje menor siempre me hace reír” (My younger brother always makes me laugh).
  • In a group of friends, someone might say, “¡Ese es mi maje!” (That’s my brother!).

36. Pana

This term is commonly used in Latin American countries to refer to a close friend or buddy. It can also be used to refer to a brother in a friendly manner.

  • For example, “Hey pana, let’s grab a drink tonight.”
  • In a conversation about plans, someone might say, “I’m going to the beach with my panas.”
  • A person might introduce their friend by saying, “This is my pana, Juan.”

37. Corillo

This word is used in Puerto Rico to refer to a group of friends or a crew. It can also be used to refer to a brother within a close-knit group.

  • For instance, “I’m going out with my corillo tonight.”
  • In a discussion about friendship, someone might say, “I have a great corillo of friends.”
  • A person might say, “I trust my corillo with anything.”

38. Socio

This term is commonly used in Spain to refer to a friend or partner. It can also be used to refer to a brother in a casual or friendly manner.

  • For example, “Hola socio, ¿qué tal?” (Hello partner, how are you?)
  • In a conversation about a business venture, someone might say, “I’m starting a new project with my socios.”
  • A person might introduce their brother by saying, “This is my socio, Miguel.”

39. Compita

This word is used in Mexico to refer to a buddy or close friend. It can also be used to refer to a brother in a friendly manner.

  • For instance, “Hey compita, let’s go grab some tacos.”
  • In a conversation about a road trip, someone might say, “I’m going on a trip with my compitas.”
  • A person might introduce their brother by saying, “This is my compita, Carlos.”

40. Paisano

This term is commonly used in Spanish-speaking countries to refer to a fellow countryman or someone from the same region or town. It can also be used to refer to a brother in a friendly or familiar way.

  • For example, “Hola paisano, ¿de dónde eres?” (Hello fellow countryman, where are you from?)
  • In a discussion about cultural heritage, someone might say, “I feel a strong connection with my paisanos.”
  • A person might introduce their brother by saying, “This is my paisano, Roberto.”