Top 29 Slang For Busy – Meaning & Usage

In today’s fast-paced world, being busy is a way of life for many of us. But keeping up with the latest trends and slangs can be a challenge when you’re always on the go. That’s where we come in. We’ve done the hard work for you and compiled a list of the top slangs for busy individuals. From time-saving abbreviations to trendy phrases, this list has everything you need to stay in the know without missing a beat. So sit back, relax, and let us keep you up to date with the hottest slangs for the always-on-the-go crowd!

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1. Swamped

This term describes a state of being extremely busy or overloaded with work or responsibilities. It implies feeling overwhelmed and unable to keep up with the workload.

  • For example, “I can’t go out tonight, I’m swamped with assignments.”
  • A colleague might say, “I’m swamped with meetings all day, can you handle this task for me?”
  • A student might complain, “I’m swamped with studying for finals, I have no free time.”

2. Slammed

Similar to “swamped,” being “slammed” means being heavily burdened with work or tasks. It implies being overwhelmed and struggling to keep up with the demands.

  • For instance, “I’ve been slammed with deadlines, I don’t know how I’ll get everything done.”
  • A coworker might say, “I’m slammed with client requests, can you take care of this one?”
  • A business owner might complain, “This week has been crazy, I’ve been slammed with orders.”

3. Busy as a bee

This phrase compares someone’s level of busyness to that of a bee, known for its constant activity. It implies being very occupied and actively engaged in various tasks.

  • For example, “I’ve been busy as a bee all day, running errands and attending meetings.”
  • A friend might say, “I haven’t seen you in ages, you must be busy as a bee.”
  • A parent might exclaim, “With three kids, I’m always busy as a bee.”

4. Up to my ears in work

This expression suggests being completely immersed in work or tasks, to the point of feeling overwhelmed. It emphasizes the high volume or intensity of one’s workload.

  • For instance, “I can’t take a break, I’m up to my ears in work.”
  • A colleague might say, “I’m up to my ears in paperwork, I need some help.”
  • A student might complain, “I’m up to my ears in assignments, I haven’t had a moment to relax.”

5. Got a lot on my plate

This phrase conveys having a significant amount of work or responsibilities to handle. It suggests being busy and having a full schedule or workload.

  • For example, “I can’t commit to any more projects, I already have a lot on my plate.”
  • A coworker might say, “I’ve got a lot on my plate this week, can you assist with this task?”
  • A parent might explain, “Between work and family, I’ve got a lot on my plate right now.”

6. Behind on my work

This phrase is used to indicate that someone is not up to date with their work or tasks. It implies that there is a backlog or a delay in completing assignments.

  • For example, a coworker might say, “I’m really behind on my work after taking a vacation.”
  • A student might confess, “I’m so behind on my assignments that I don’t know where to start.”
  • A freelancer might complain, “I’ve been juggling multiple projects and I’m falling behind on my work.”

7. Tied up

This phrase is used to describe someone who is busy or occupied with tasks, commitments, or responsibilities. It implies that the person is unable to give their attention to anything else.

  • For instance, a parent might say, “I can’t talk right now, I’m tied up with the kids.”
  • A professional might explain, “I won’t be available for the meeting, I’m tied up with another project.”
  • A friend might apologize, “Sorry, I can’t hang out tonight, I’m tied up with work.”

8. Crowded

This word is used to describe a situation or place that is filled with a large number of people or things. It implies a lack of space or room due to the high volume of activity or presence.

  • For example, someone might say, “The subway was so crowded that I could barely move.”
  • A shopper might comment, “The mall is always crowded on weekends.”
  • A concertgoer might exclaim, “The venue was packed and it felt like everyone was there!”

9. Packed

This term is used to describe a place or schedule that is completely filled or busy. It implies that there is no more space or time available due to the high level of activity or occupancy.

  • For instance, a traveler might say, “The airport was packed with holiday travelers.”
  • A restaurant-goer might state, “The popular restaurant is always packed, so make a reservation.”
  • A student might lament, “My schedule is packed with classes, clubs, and part-time work.”

10. Buried in work

This phrase is used to convey a sense of being overwhelmed or swamped with work or tasks. It implies that there is a large amount of work to be done and the person feels buried or buried under the workload.

  • For example, a colleague might say, “I’m buried in work and can’t take on any more projects.”
  • A freelancer might express, “I’ve been working non-stop and I’m buried in client requests.”
  • A student might sigh, “I’m buried in assignments and exams, I need a break.”

11. In high demand

This phrase is used to describe something or someone that is in great demand or highly desired.

  • For example, “The new iPhone is in high demand and selling out quickly.”
  • A business might say, “Our products are in high demand due to their quality and functionality.”
  • A job posting might state, “We are looking for candidates with skills that are in high demand in the industry.”

12. Hectic

This word is used to describe a situation or period of time that is very busy, chaotic, or full of activity.

  • For instance, “My schedule is so hectic right now, I don’t have a free moment.”
  • A student might say, “Finals week is always hectic with studying and exams.”
  • A parent might describe their morning routine as, “Getting the kids ready for school is always a hectic time.”

13. Non-stop

This phrase is used to describe an activity or situation that continues without pause or interruption.

  • For example, “I’ve been working non-stop all day and I’m exhausted.”
  • A traveler might say, “Our vacation was non-stop sightseeing and exploring.”
  • A partygoer might describe a night out as, “It was non-stop dancing and fun.”

14. Jam-packed

This phrase is used to describe a place or event that is extremely full or crowded with people or things.

  • For instance, “The concert was jam-packed with fans eager to see their favorite band.”
  • A traveler might say, “The airport was jam-packed with holiday travelers.”
  • A shopper might describe a sale as, “The store was jam-packed with people trying to get the best deals.”

15. Buried

This word is used to describe a person who is extremely busy or overwhelmed with a large amount of work or tasks.

  • For example, “I’m buried with deadlines and meetings this week.”
  • A student might say, “I’m buried in homework and studying for exams.”
  • A professional might describe their workload as, “I’m buried in projects and client requests.”

16. Crazy busy

This phrase is used to describe someone who is overwhelmed with tasks or responsibilities. It implies that the person has a lot on their plate and is struggling to keep up with everything.

  • For example, “I can’t hang out tonight, I’m crazy busy with work deadlines.”
  • A student might say, “I’ve been crazy busy studying for exams and finishing assignments.”
  • Someone might complain, “I’ve been crazy busy running errands all day, I haven’t had a moment to relax.”

17. Snowed under

This phrase means being buried or overwhelmed with work or responsibilities. It suggests that the person has so much to do that they feel like they are being buried under a pile of tasks.

  • For instance, “I’m sorry, I can’t take on any more projects right now, I’m completely snowed under.”
  • A busy parent might say, “Between work, household chores, and taking care of the kids, I’m constantly snowed under.”
  • Someone might complain, “I can’t catch a break, I’ve been snowed under with meetings all day.”

18. Juggling a million things

This phrase describes someone who is trying to manage or handle multiple tasks or responsibilities at the same time. It suggests that the person is constantly switching between different things and trying to keep everything in balance.

  • For example, “I feel like I’m juggling a million things at once, between work, family, and personal commitments.”
  • A busy professional might say, “As a project manager, I’m constantly juggling a million things to keep everything on track.”
  • Someone might exclaim, “I don’t know how she does it, she’s always juggling a million things and still manages to stay organized.”

19. Burning the candle at both ends

This phrase means working excessively or pushing oneself to the limits by working long hours or taking on too many commitments. It implies that the person is using up all their energy and resources to meet their responsibilities.

  • For instance, “I’ve been burning the candle at both ends trying to meet all my deadlines.”
  • A busy entrepreneur might say, “Running a startup is tough, I’m constantly burning the candle at both ends to make it successful.”
  • Someone might warn, “Be careful not to burn the candle at both ends for too long, it can lead to burnout.”

20. Nose to the grindstone

This phrase means working diligently and persistently. It suggests that the person is focused and dedicated to their work, often with little time for leisure or relaxation.

  • For example, “I’ve got my nose to the grindstone, trying to finish this project on time.”
  • A student might say, “I’ve been putting my nose to the grindstone to study for my exams.”
  • Someone might admire a colleague and say, “She’s always got her nose to the grindstone, she’s such a hard worker.”

21. Run off one’s feet

This phrase is used to describe someone who is very busy and constantly on the move. It implies that the person has so much to do that they are metaphorically running to keep up with their tasks.

  • For example, “I’ve been running off my feet all day trying to meet deadlines.”
  • A coworker might say, “Our boss has been running off her feet lately with all the new projects.”
  • Someone might complain, “I feel like I’m constantly running off my feet and never have a moment to relax.”

22. Flat out

This slang term is used to describe someone who is working or doing something at their highest level of effort or speed. It implies that the person is fully engaged and giving their all to the task at hand.

  • For instance, “I’ve been flat out all week trying to finish this project.”
  • A friend might say, “I’ve been flat out studying for exams and haven’t had time for anything else.”
  • Someone might comment, “I can’t hang out tonight, I’m flat out with work.”

23. Juggling

This term is used to describe the act of handling or managing multiple tasks or responsibilities at the same time. It implies that the person is skillfully balancing different obligations.

  • For example, “I’ve been juggling work, school, and family responsibilities.”
  • A parent might say, “I’m constantly juggling my kids’ schedules and my own work.”
  • Someone might mention, “I’ve been juggling multiple projects at work and it’s been quite challenging.”

24. Burnt out

This slang term is used to describe someone who is physically, mentally, or emotionally exhausted and overwhelmed due to excessive work or stress. It implies that the person has reached a point of exhaustion and is unable to continue at the same pace.

  • For instance, “I’ve been feeling burnt out lately and need a break.”
  • A coworker might say, “Our team is burnt out from working long hours.”
  • Someone might admit, “I think I’m on the verge of burnout with all the demands on my plate.”

25. Stretched thin

This phrase is used to describe someone who has too many tasks, responsibilities, or obligations and not enough time or resources to effectively manage them all. It implies that the person is spread too thin and may struggle to meet all their commitments.

  • For example, “I’m feeling stretched thin with all the projects I have to juggle.”
  • A friend might say, “I’ve been stretched thin lately and could really use some help.”
  • Someone might mention, “Our team is stretched thin with the increased workload and tight deadlines.”

26. On the clock

This phrase refers to being actively engaged in work or on the job. It implies that someone is currently working and being paid for their time.

  • For example, “I can’t chat right now, I’m on the clock.”
  • A coworker might say, “You better get that report done, we’re on the clock.”
  • Someone might ask, “Are you on the clock or on a break?”

27. Under the gun

This slang phrase means to be in a situation where there is a lot of pressure or a tight deadline. It often implies a sense of urgency and stress.

  • For instance, “I’m really under the gun to finish this project by tomorrow.”
  • A student might say, “I have three exams this week, so I’m really under the gun.”
  • A coworker might ask, “Are you feeling under the gun with that deadline approaching?”

28. Full plate

This phrase means to have a lot of tasks or responsibilities to handle. It implies that someone’s schedule is already filled with commitments.

  • For example, “I can’t take on any more projects right now, my plate is full.”
  • A friend might say, “Sorry, I can’t hang out tonight, I have a full plate.”
  • A coworker might ask, “Do you have room on your plate to take on this extra assignment?”

29. On the move

This slang phrase means to be constantly busy or active, often with various tasks or activities.

  • For instance, “I’ve been on the move all day, running errands and attending meetings.”
  • Someone might say, “I can’t sit still, I’m always on the move.”
  • A coworker might comment, “You’re always on the move, I don’t know how you do it.”
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