Top 75 Slang For But – Meaning & Usage

The word “but” is a versatile conjunction that is commonly used in everyday English. However, did you know that there are a plethora of slang terms for “but” that are used by different communities and subcultures? From casual conversations to online forums, these slang words add a touch of creativity and flair to our language. In this article, we’ve gathered the top slang terms for “but” that you might not have heard before. Get ready to expand your vocabulary and impress your friends with these unique expressions!

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1. Yet

“Yet” is used to introduce a contrasting statement or idea that goes against what has been previously mentioned.

  • For example, “I studied all night, yet I still failed the test.”
  • A person might say, “I wanted to go to the party, yet I had too much work to do.”
  • Another might say, “I know it’s risky, yet I still want to try.”

2. Nevertheless

“Nevertheless” is used to introduce a contrasting statement or idea that goes against what has been previously mentioned. It is a more formal alternative to “but” and is often used to add emphasis to the contrast.

  • For instance, “The weather was terrible, nevertheless, we decided to go for a hike.”
  • A person might say, “I understand the risks, nevertheless, I am determined to pursue my dreams.”
  • Another might say, “The project was challenging, nevertheless, we were able to complete it on time.”

3. Still

“Still” is used to introduce a contrasting statement or idea that goes against what has been previously mentioned. It emphasizes that the following information is unexpected or surprising.

  • For example, “I told her not to eat the cake, but she still ate it.”
  • A person might say, “I thought I had prepared well for the exam, but I still failed.”
  • Another might say, “He promised to be on time, but he still arrived late.”

4. However

“However” is used to introduce a contrasting statement or idea that goes against what has been previously mentioned. It is a more formal alternative to “but” and is often used to add emphasis to the contrast.

  • For instance, “She is very talented; however, she lacks confidence.”
  • A person might say, “I enjoy traveling; however, I don’t like long flights.”
  • Another might say, “The food was delicious; however, the service was slow.”

5. Though

“Though” is used to introduce a contrasting statement or idea that goes against what has been previously mentioned. It is a more informal alternative to “but” and is often used to add emphasis to the contrast.

  • For example, “I am tired, though I still want to go to the party.”
  • A person might say, “It’s raining, though I still want to go for a walk.”
  • Another might say, “He is young, though he is very talented.”

6. Although

This word is used to introduce a contrasting idea or statement. It is often used to express a contradiction or exception to what has been previously mentioned.

  • For example, “Although it was raining, we decided to go for a walk.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might say, “Although I understand your point of view, I disagree with it.”
  • A writer might use this word in an essay to introduce a counterargument, such as “Although some people believe that video games are harmful, studies have shown their benefits.”

7. Nonetheless

This word is used to indicate that despite a previous statement or situation, the following statement is still true or valid. It is often used to express a concession or acknowledgment of a contrasting point.

  • For instance, “I didn’t win the race, but I finished with a personal best time. Nonetheless, I was proud of my performance.”
  • In a debate, someone might say, “You make a valid point, but nonetheless, I still believe that universal healthcare is necessary.”
  • A writer might use this word to acknowledge a potential criticism before presenting their argument, such as “I am not an expert in the field, nonetheless, I have conducted extensive research on the topic.”

8. On the other hand

This phrase is used to introduce an alternative or contrasting viewpoint. It is often used to present the opposite side of an argument or to provide additional information that contradicts or complements the previous statement.

  • For example, “I love the beach. On the other hand, my friend prefers the mountains.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might say, “Some argue that social media brings people together, but on the other hand, it can also contribute to feelings of isolation.”
  • A writer might use this phrase to present a different perspective before offering their own opinion, such as “On the other hand, some researchers argue that the benefits of technology outweigh the risks.”

9. In contrast

This phrase is used to highlight a difference or contradiction between two ideas or situations. It is often used to emphasize the distinction between two opposing concepts or to point out a contrasting element.

  • For instance, “He is outgoing and sociable. In contrast, his sister is shy and introverted.”
  • In a comparison between two products, someone might say, “Product A is affordable and lightweight. In contrast, Product B is more expensive and durable.”
  • A writer might use this phrase to introduce a contrasting example or evidence, such as “In contrast to previous studies, our research found no significant correlation between the two variables.”

10. Except

This word is used to introduce an exception or exclusion to a previous statement. It is often used to indicate that everything mentioned is true except for the following information.

  • For example, “Everyone was invited to the party except for John.”
  • In a list of requirements, someone might say, “You need to submit all the documents except for the medical certificate.”
  • A writer might use this word to highlight a specific case that deviates from the general trend, such as “All the students passed the exam except for one.”

11. Barring

This term is used to indicate an exception or exclusion. It means that everything is true or possible, except for the specific thing mentioned.

  • For example, “Barring any unforeseen circumstances, the event will take place as scheduled.”
  • In a discussion about travel restrictions, someone might say, “Barring any changes in regulations, we can still go on our vacation.”
  • A coach might say, “Barring any injuries, our team has a good chance of winning the championship.”

12. Save

This word is used to introduce an exception or exclusion. It means that everything is true or possible, except for the specific thing mentioned.

  • For instance, “I like all fruits, save for bananas.”
  • In a conversation about dietary restrictions, someone might say, “I can eat anything, save for gluten.”
  • A person discussing their preferences might say, “I enjoy all genres of music, save for country.”

13. Without

This term is used to indicate the absence or exclusion of something. It means that something is not present or not included.

  • For example, “I can’t imagine my life without you.”
  • In a discussion about a recipe, someone might say, “You can make this dish without onions.”
  • A person discussing their achievements might say, “I reached my goals without any external help.”

14. Excluding

This word is used to indicate that something is not included or considered as part of a group or category.

  • For instance, “The price of the ticket is $10, excluding tax.”
  • In a conversation about eligibility, someone might say, “Everyone is invited to the party, excluding John.”
  • A person discussing their preferences might say, “I enjoy all sports, excluding basketball.”

15. Minus

This term is used to indicate subtraction or the removal of something.

  • For example, “Five minus two equals three.”
  • In a discussion about expenses, someone might say, “We need to subtract the cost of materials, minus the labor.”
  • A person discussing their schedule might say, “I have a busy day ahead, minus the lunch break.”

16. Disregarding

This term is used to indicate that something is being overlooked or not taken into account. It suggests that a particular factor is being disregarded or ignored in a given situation.

  • For example, “Disregarding the cost, the vacation was worth every penny.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might say, “Disregarding the opinions of others, I stand by my beliefs.”
  • A person might argue, “Disregarding the risks, I’m going to pursue my dreams.”

17. Omitting

When something is omitted, it means that it has been intentionally left out or excluded. This term implies that a specific element or detail is being purposefully disregarded or not included.

  • For instance, “The report was concise, omitting unnecessary information.”
  • In a recipe, a step might say, “Omitting salt will result in a less flavorful dish.”
  • A person might say, “Omitting personal anecdotes made the presentation more professional.”

18. Aside from

This phrase is used to indicate that something is being mentioned or considered separately from something else. It suggests that a particular aspect is being singled out or discussed independently.

  • For example, “Aside from the weather, everything went according to plan.”
  • In a conversation about a movie, someone might say, “Aside from the ending, I really enjoyed it.”
  • A person might argue, “Aside from his lack of experience, he has all the qualifications for the job.”

19. Not including

When something is not included, it means that it is being intentionally left out or not considered. This term suggests that a specific item or factor is being deliberately excluded from a given context.

  • For instance, “The price does not include tax.”
  • In a list of requirements, a job posting might state, “Not including a cover letter will result in disqualification.”
  • A person might say, “Not including personal preferences, the decision was based solely on merit.”

20. Other than

This phrase is used to indicate that something is different or distinct from something else. It suggests that a particular element or aspect is being highlighted as an exception or alternative.

  • For example, “Other than that one mistake, everything was perfect.”
  • In a discussion about food preferences, someone might say, “I don’t like any fruit other than apples.”
  • A person might argue, “Other than his lack of punctuality, he’s a great employee.”

21. Apart from

This phrase is used to introduce an exception or exclusion to a previous statement. It is often used to provide additional information or clarify a situation.

  • For example, “Apart from the rainy weather, we had a great time on our vacation.”
  • In a discussion about different types of fruit, someone might say, “I like all fruits, apart from bananas.”
  • A person might explain, “Apart from my job, I also volunteer at a local shelter.”

22. Leaving out

This phrase is used to indicate that something or someone is not included in a particular situation or group. It is often used to emphasize the omission or highlight what is being excluded.

  • For instance, “We invited everyone to the party, leaving out only a few close friends.”
  • In a conversation about a team project, someone might say, “We should divide the tasks, leaving out the ones we can’t handle.”
  • A person might state, “Leaving out the unnecessary details, this is the main point of the story.”

23. Rather

This word is used to express a preference or choice for one thing over another. It can also be used to indicate a different or alternative option.

  • For example, “I would rather stay home than go out tonight.”
  • In a discussion about food choices, someone might say, “I’d rather have pizza instead of sushi.”
  • A person might explain, “I’d rather save money for a vacation than spend it on expensive clothes.”

24. Tho

This is a shortened form of the word “though” and is used to indicate a contrast or contradiction to a previous statement. It is often used in informal or casual conversations.

  • For instance, “I know it’s risky, but I want to try it tho.”
  • In a discussion about a challenging situation, someone might say, “It’s difficult, but we’ll find a way tho.”
  • A person might explain, “I’m tired, but I’ll keep going tho.”

25. Thru

This is a shortened form of the word “through” and is used to indicate movement or completion of an action. It is often used in informal or casual writing.

  • For example, “I walked thru the park and enjoyed the scenery.”
  • In a conversation about a book, someone might say, “I couldn’t put it down and read it thru the night.”
  • A person might state, “I need to go thru my emails and respond to them.”

26. Cuz

A shortened form of “because,” often used in casual conversations or texts. It is used to provide a reason or explanation for something.

  • For example, “I couldn’t go to the party cuz I had to work.”
  • In a text conversation, someone might say, “Cuz it’s raining, let’s stay indoors.”
  • A person might ask, “Why did you do that?” and the response could be, “Cuz I felt like it.”

27. Bc

An abbreviation of “because,” commonly used in text messages or online chats. It is used to give a reason or justification for something.

  • For instance, “I can’t come to the meeting bc I’m stuck in traffic.”
  • In a conversation about food preferences, someone might say, “I don’t like spicy food bc it upsets my stomach.”
  • A person might explain their actions by saying, “I did it bc I thought it was the right thing to do.”

28. Coz

An informal abbreviation of “because,” often used in casual conversations. It is used to provide a reason or explanation for something.

  • For example, “I didn’t go to the party coz I wasn’t feeling well.”
  • In a discussion about travel plans, someone might say, “Let’s go to the beach coz it’s sunny.”
  • A person might ask, “Why did you say that?” and the response could be, “Coz I wanted to make a point.”

29. B4

A shorthand form of “before,” commonly used in text messages or online chats. It is used to indicate that something happened prior to a specific time or event.

  • For instance, “I’ll meet you b4 dinner at the restaurant.”
  • In a conversation about a movie, someone might say, “I watched the sequels b4 watching the original.”
  • A person might mention, “I used to live in that neighborhood b4 moving to the city center.”

30. C’mon

A contraction of “come on,” often used to express disbelief, encouragement, or frustration.

  • For example, “C’mon, you can do it! Don’t give up.”
  • In a conversation about a challenging task, someone might say, “C’mon, we just need to push through and finish.”
  • A person might express disappointment by saying, “C’mon, that’s not fair!”

31. Gotta

A contraction of “got to,” used to indicate a strong obligation or necessity to do something. It is often used in informal speech.

  • For example, “I gotta go to work early tomorrow.”
  • A person might say, “I gotta finish this report before the deadline.”
  • Another might say, “I gotta call my mom and wish her a happy birthday.”

32. Wanna

A contraction of “want to,” used to express a desire or intention to do something. It is commonly used in casual conversation.

  • For instance, “I wanna go to the beach this weekend.”
  • A person might say, “I wanna try that new restaurant everyone’s talking about.”
  • Another might say, “I wanna learn how to play the guitar.”

33. Kinda

A contraction of “kind of,” used to indicate a moderate or partial agreement or resemblance. It is often used in informal speech.

  • For example, “I kinda like that movie.”
  • A person might say, “It’s kinda cold outside.”
  • Another might say, “I’m kinda tired, but I’ll still go out with friends.”

34. Sorta

A contraction of “sort of,” used to express a vague or uncertain description or classification. It is commonly used in casual conversation.

  • For instance, “He’s sorta funny.”
  • A person might say, “I’m sorta busy right now.”
  • Another might say, “It’s sorta like a mix between a dog and a cat.”

35. Lotta

A contraction of “lot of,” used to indicate a large quantity or amount of something. It is often used in informal speech.

  • For example, “I have a lotta homework to do.”
  • A person might say, “There’s a lotta traffic on the highway.”
  • Another might say, “I’ve seen a lotta movies, but that one is my favorite.”

36. Ain’t

The contraction “ain’t” is used to replace “am not,” “are not,” or “is not.” It is often used in informal speech or writing, and can indicate a negative or nonstandard form of “but.”

  • For example, “I ain’t going to the party tonight.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “I ain’t got time for that.”
  • A song lyric might include, “You ain’t seen nothing yet.”

37. Dunno

This slang term is a contraction of “don’t know.” It is commonly used in casual conversation or online communication to express uncertainty or lack of knowledge.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “What time does the movie start?” a response might be, “I dunno.”
  • In a discussion about a complex topic, someone might admit, “I dunno much about that.”
  • A person might ask, “Dunno if I can make it to the party. What time does it end?”

38. Lemme

This slang term is a contraction of “let me.” It is often used in informal speech or writing to express a request or desire to do something.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Can you pass me the salt?” a response might be, “Lemme grab it for you.”
  • In a conversation about plans, someone might say, “Lemme check my schedule and get back to you.”
  • A person might exclaim, “Lemme try that new restaurant everyone’s talking about!”

39. Gimme

This slang term is a contraction of “give me.” It is commonly used in casual speech or writing to express a desire or request for something.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Can I have a piece of cake?” a response might be, “Sure, gimme a sec.”
  • In a conversation about sharing, someone might say, “Gimme a bite of your sandwich.”
  • A person might plead, “Gimme a chance to prove myself!”

40. Gonna

This slang term is a contraction of “going to.” It is often used in informal speech or writing to indicate future plans or intentions.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Are you going to the party?” a response might be, “Yeah, I’m gonna be there.”
  • In a discussion about travel, someone might say, “I’m gonna visit Europe next summer.”
  • A person might exclaim, “I’m gonna ace this test!”

41. Hafta

This is a contraction of “have to” and is commonly used in informal speech to indicate a necessity or obligation to do something.

  • For example, “I hafta go to work tomorrow.”
  • Someone might say, “I hafta finish this project by the end of the day.”
  • In a casual conversation, one might ask, “Do you hafta leave so soon?”

42. Oughta

This is a contraction of “ought to” and is used to express a recommendation or suggestion about what should be done or what is expected.

  • For instance, “You oughta try the new restaurant in town.”
  • A person might say, “I oughta call my mom and wish her a happy birthday.”
  • In a discussion about future plans, someone might ask, “What do you think I oughta do?”

43. Tryna

This is a contraction of “trying to” and is commonly used in informal speech to indicate an attempt or intention to do something.

  • For example, “I’m tryna lose weight before summer.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m tryna find a new job.”
  • In a casual conversation, one might ask, “What are you tryna accomplish with that?”

44. D’you

This is a contraction of “do you” and is used to ask a question or seek clarification about something.

  • For instance, “D’you want to go out for dinner tonight?”
  • A person might say, “D’you know where the nearest gas station is?”
  • In a conversation about preferences, someone might ask, “D’you like spicy food?”

45. D’ya

This is a contraction of “do you” and is used to ask a question or seek clarification about something, similar to “d’you”.

  • For example, “D’ya have any plans for the weekend?”
  • A person might say, “D’ya think it will rain tomorrow?”
  • In a conversation about hobbies, someone might ask, “D’ya enjoy playing sports?”

46. Btwn

This is a shortened form of the word “between.” It is often used in informal communication, such as text messages or online chats.

  • For example, “I can’t decide btwn pizza and pasta for dinner.”
  • In a discussion about travel destinations, someone might say, “I’m torn btwn going to the beach or exploring the city.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you prefer dogs or cats? I can’t choose btwn them!”

47. Cos

This is a shortened form of the word “because.” It is commonly used in informal writing and speech.

  • For instance, “I didn’t go to the party cos I was feeling tired.”
  • In a conversation about a missed deadline, someone might explain, “I couldn’t finish the report on time cos I had a family emergency.”
  • A person might say, “I love hiking cos it allows me to connect with nature.”

48. Cld

This is a shortened form of the word “could.” It is often used in informal communication.

  • For example, “I cld help you with that project if you need.”
  • In a discussion about past events, someone might say, “I cld have gone to the concert, but I had to work.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you think you cld pass the test if you studied more?”

49. Wld

This is a shortened form of the word “would.” It is commonly used in informal writing and speech.

  • For instance, “I wld love to go on a vacation to a tropical island.”
  • In a conversation about hypothetical situations, someone might say, “If I won the lottery, I wld buy a house.”
  • A person might ask, “Wld you like some coffee with your breakfast?”

50. Shld

This is a shortened form of the word “should.” It is often used in informal communication.

  • For example, “You shld try the new restaurant in town, it’s amazing.”
  • In a discussion about advice, someone might say, “You shld take some time off to relax and recharge.”
  • A person might ask, “Shld I bring anything to the party?”

51. M8

This is a slang term derived from the word “mate,” which means friend or companion. It is commonly used in British English and among online gamers to refer to a friend or close acquaintance.

  • For example, “Hey m8, wanna grab a pint after work?”
  • Two friends might greet each other with, “What’s up, m8?”
  • In an online game, a player might ask, “Anyone need help? I got you, m8.”

52. Bro

Derived from the word “brother,” this slang term is used to refer to a close male friend or buddy. It is commonly used among young people and is often associated with a sense of camaraderie and friendship.

  • For instance, “Hey bro, let’s hit the gym together.”
  • Two friends might address each other as “bro” in casual conversation.
  • In a group of friends, someone might say, “I love you guys, you’re like my bros.”

53. Sis

Similar to “bro,” this slang term is derived from the word “sister” and is used to refer to a close female friend or buddy. It conveys a sense of sisterhood and friendship among women.

  • For example, “Hey sis, want to grab lunch?”
  • Two friends might use “sis” as a term of endearment or camaraderie.
  • In a group of girlfriends, someone might say, “I’m so grateful to have you all as my sis.”

54. Y

This is a shortened form of the word “why” and is commonly used in informal communication, such as text messages or online chats. It is used as a conjunction to ask for a reason or explanation.

  • For instance, “Y are you late?”
  • Someone might text, “Y did you do that?”
  • In a casual conversation, a person might ask, “Y didn’t you come to the party?”

55. On the flip side

This phrase is used to introduce an opposing viewpoint or alternative perspective. It is often used to present a contrasting idea or to provide balance to a previous statement.

  • For example, “I love the beach, but on the flip side, I’m not a fan of the sand.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might say, “Some people support this policy, but on the flip side, others have concerns.”
  • A person presenting an argument might use this phrase to acknowledge a counterpoint, saying, “I understand your perspective, but on the flip side, consider this.”

56. On the contrary

This phrase is used to introduce a contrasting or opposing statement to what has been previously mentioned. It is often used to challenge or contradict a previous statement.

  • For example, if someone says, “I thought the movie was boring,” another person might respond, “On the contrary, I found it quite entertaining.”
  • In a debate, one person might argue, “The evidence suggests that climate change is real,” and the other might counter, “On the contrary, the data is inconclusive.”
  • A teacher might correct a student by saying, “You claimed that the Earth is flat. On the contrary, it is a sphere.”

57. In spite of that

This phrase is used to acknowledge a previous point or situation while still expressing a contrasting idea or action. It suggests that despite the previous statement, the new information or action is still valid.

  • For instance, if someone says, “I’m really tired, but I’ll still go to the party,” they might add, “In spite of that, I’ll have a great time.”
  • A person might say, “I know I made a mistake, but in spite of that, I’m still proud of my accomplishments.”
  • In a discussion about a challenging situation, someone might say, “In spite of that, we managed to find a solution.”

58. Even so

This phrase is used to introduce a contrasting or unexpected statement that may seem contradictory to what has been previously mentioned. It is often used to emphasize a surprising or unexpected outcome.

  • For example, if someone says, “I studied really hard for the test, but I still failed,” they might add, “Even so, I learned a lot from the experience.”
  • In a discussion about a difficult decision, one person might say, “I know it’s risky, but even so, I think it’s worth taking a chance.”
  • A person might say, “I was nervous about the interview, but even so, I managed to impress the hiring manager.”

59. Be that as it may

This phrase is used to acknowledge a previous point or situation while still expressing a contrasting idea or opinion. It suggests that despite the previous statement, the new information or opinion holds true.

  • For instance, if someone says, “I don’t agree with your decision, but be that as it may, I respect your choice.”
  • In a debate, one person might argue, “The study shows that vaccines are safe,” and the other might respond, “Be that as it may, I still have concerns about their long-term effects.”
  • A person might say, “I understand your concerns, but be that as it may, I think we should proceed with the plan.”

60. That being said

This phrase is used to introduce a contrasting or qualifying statement after discussing a previous point. It is often used to provide additional context or to acknowledge a potential counterargument.

  • For example, if someone says, “I think the movie was well-made, but it lacked a compelling storyline,” they might add, “That being said, the cinematography was stunning.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, one person might argue, “Some people believe in capital punishment, but that being said, there are concerns about wrongful convictions.”
  • A person might say, “I appreciate your feedback, but that being said, I still stand by my decision.”

61. All the same

This phrase is used to introduce a contrasting idea or opinion. It is often used to acknowledge a difference but still maintain a similar or unchanged outcome.

  • For example, “She was tired, but she decided to go to the party all the same.”
  • In a discussion about different opinions, someone might say, “I understand your point of view, but I still believe all the same.”
  • Another usage could be, “He failed the test, but he was happy all the same.”

62. Notwithstanding

This word is used to introduce a contrast or exception to a previous statement. It is often used to indicate that something is true or valid despite other factors or conditions.

  • For instance, “The weather was terrible, but we still had a great time, notwithstanding the rain.”
  • In a legal context, someone might say, “The defendant’s actions were negligent, notwithstanding their lack of intent.”
  • Another usage could be, “She had a difficult childhood, but she achieved great success in her career, notwithstanding her past.”

63. Despite that

This phrase is used to introduce a contrasting idea or situation. It is often used to indicate that something happened or is true regardless of other factors or circumstances.

  • For example, “He studied all night, but despite that, he still failed the exam.”
  • In a discussion about challenges, someone might say, “I faced many obstacles, but I still managed to succeed, despite that.”
  • Another usage could be, “They had a disagreement, but despite that, they remained good friends.”

64. Albeit

This word is used to introduce a contrasting idea or condition. It is often used to indicate a concession or acknowledgment of a different perspective.

  • For instance, “She was tired, albeit excited, after a long day of work.”
  • In a discussion about limitations, someone might say, “He had some reservations, albeit understandable, about taking on the project.”
  • Another usage could be, “The weather was cold, albeit sunny, during the outdoor event.”

65. In any case

This phrase is used to introduce a contrasting idea or situation. It is often used to indicate that something is true or will happen regardless of other factors or circumstances.

  • For example, “We may face difficulties, but in any case, we will find a solution.”
  • In a discussion about options, someone might say, “There are risks involved, but in any case, we must move forward.”
  • Another usage could be, “He may not agree, but in any case, the decision is final.”

66. Regardless

This term is used to introduce a contrasting point or condition. It implies that something is happening or should be done without regard to any other factors or circumstances.

  • For example, “He decided to go for a swim regardless of the cold weather.”
  • In a discussion about travel plans, someone might say, “I’m going on vacation regardless of the current situation.”
  • A person might assert, “Regardless of what others think, I’m going to pursue my dreams.”

67. Conversely

This term is used to introduce an opposite or contrasting idea. It suggests a different perspective or viewpoint that should be considered.

  • For instance, “He loves spicy food; conversely, I can’t handle any heat.”
  • In a debate about a controversial topic, someone might argue, “While many believe in stricter gun control, conversely, I believe in upholding the Second Amendment.”
  • A person might say, “I usually prefer sweet treats, but conversely, I’m in the mood for something salty.”

68. In any event

This term is used to indicate that something will happen or should be done regardless of other circumstances or outcomes.

  • For example, “I’ll be there to support you in any event.”
  • In a discussion about potential risks, someone might say, “We should be prepared for any event.”
  • A person might assert, “In any event, we must prioritize safety.”

69. Even though

This term is used to introduce a contrasting point or condition. It acknowledges a contradictory or unexpected situation but emphasizes that it does not change the overall outcome or decision.

  • For instance, “Even though it was raining, she still went for a run.”
  • In a discussion about personal preferences, someone might say, “Even though I don’t like coffee, I’ll join you for a cup.”
  • A person might assert, “Even though it’s challenging, I won’t give up on my goals.”

70. Howevs

This term is a casual abbreviation of “however” and is used to introduce a contrasting or opposing point.

  • For example, “I love dogs; howevs, I’m allergic to them.”
  • In a discussion about different opinions, someone might say, “I understand your perspective; howevs, I have a different view.”
  • A person might assert, “I enjoy going out with friends; howevs, I also value my alone time.”

71. That said

This phrase is used to introduce a contrasting or qualifying statement after making a previous point. It is often used to acknowledge a different perspective or to provide additional information.

  • For example, “The weather forecast is calling for rain tomorrow. That said, I still think we should go hiking.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might say, “I understand your point of view. That said, I believe we should consider the long-term effects.”
  • A person might use this phrase to acknowledge a previous statement and offer a different perspective, such as, “I know you’re worried about the cost. That said, this investment has the potential for high returns.”

72. At any rate

This phrase is used to indicate a change in topic or to transition to a different point. It is often used to summarize or conclude a discussion.

  • For instance, “We’ve discussed all the options. At any rate, I think we should go with Plan A.”
  • In a conversation about a past event, someone might say, “The party was a disaster. At any rate, we learned a valuable lesson.”
  • A person might use this phrase to move on from a previous topic and introduce a new idea, such as, “We’ve talked enough about work. At any rate, have you seen any good movies lately?”

73. Yet still

This phrase is used to introduce a contrasting or opposing idea. It is often used to emphasize a point or to indicate that despite something, the opposite is still true.

  • For example, “I’ve been working hard, yet still, I haven’t made much progress.”
  • In a discussion about a challenging situation, someone might say, “The odds are against us, yet still, we must persevere.”
  • A person might use this phrase to acknowledge a difficulty or obstacle and highlight their determination, such as, “I’m tired, yet still, I will keep pushing forward.”

74. Still and all

This phrase is used to introduce a contrasting idea or to acknowledge a different perspective. It is often used to add nuance to a statement or to provide a counterpoint.

  • For instance, “I know it’s a risky move. Still and all, I think it’s worth trying.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might say, “There are valid arguments on both sides. Still and all, I lean towards stricter regulations.”
  • A person might use this phrase to recognize the validity of an opposing view while still expressing their own opinion, such as, “I understand your concerns. Still and all, I believe this is the best course of action.”

75. But still

This phrase is used to introduce a contrasting or opposing idea. It is often used to present a different perspective or to indicate a contradiction.

  • For example, “I know it’s a risky investment. But still, I think the potential rewards outweigh the risks.”
  • In a discussion about a difficult decision, someone might say, “I understand your reservations. But still, I believe it’s the right choice.”
  • A person might use this phrase to acknowledge a counterargument or objection and offer their own perspective, such as, “I hear what you’re saying. But still, I think we should give it a try.”
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