Top 54 Slang For By This Means – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to expressing actions or ideas done through a particular method or manner, having the right slang can make a world of difference. Join us as we uncover the top slang terms for “by this means” that will not only keep you in the loop but also add a touch of flair to your conversations. Get ready to level up your language game with these trendy expressions that are sure to make you stand out in any crowd.

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1. BTW

This is used to introduce additional or tangential information in a conversation or message. It is often used to add something unrelated to the main topic.

  • For example, “BTW, did you hear about the new restaurant that just opened?”
  • In a text message, someone might say, “I’ll be there in 10 minutes. BTW, I picked up your favorite snack.”
  • When discussing plans, someone might add, “BTW, I won’t be able to make it to the party on Friday.”

2. FYI

This is used to provide information or make someone aware of something. It is often used to share knowledge or give a heads-up.

  • For instance, “FYI, the meeting has been rescheduled to tomorrow.”
  • In an email, someone might write, “FYI, the deadline for the project has been extended.”
  • When sharing news, someone might say, “FYI, there’s a new coffee shop opening in our neighborhood.”

3. AFAIK

This is used to indicate that the information being shared is based on the speaker’s knowledge and may not be definitive or complete. It is often used to convey uncertainty or to qualify a statement.

  • For example, “AFAIK, the event starts at 7 PM, but you might want to double-check.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “AFAIK, she hasn’t made a decision yet.”
  • When discussing a rumor, someone might add, “AFAIK, there’s no truth to the gossip.”

4. IMO

This is used to express a personal viewpoint or belief. It is often used to share subjective thoughts or perspectives.

  • For instance, “IMO, the movie was a bit predictable.”
  • In a discussion, someone might say, “IMO, this approach would yield better results.”
  • When expressing disagreement, someone might add, “IMO, that’s not the best course of action.”

5. TBH

This is used to preface a statement that the speaker believes to be true, even if it may be uncomfortable or unpopular. It is often used to convey sincerity or authenticity.

  • For example, “TBH, I didn’t really enjoy the party.”
  • In a text message, someone might say, “TBH, I’m not sure if I can make it tomorrow.”
  • When giving feedback, someone might add, “TBH, I think your presentation could use some improvement.”

6. IIRC

This acronym is used when someone is unsure about a certain fact or information but believes their recollection is accurate. It is commonly used when discussing past events or details.

  • For example, “IIRC, the meeting was scheduled for 2 PM.”
  • In a conversation about a movie, someone might say, “IIRC, that actor won an Oscar for that role.”
  • When reminiscing about a vacation, a person might say, “IIRC, the beach was absolutely beautiful.”

7. ICYMI

This abbreviation is used to bring attention to something that may have been overlooked or not seen by someone. It is often used when sharing news, articles, or important information.

  • For instance, “ICYMI, there was a major announcement made by the company yesterday.”
  • When sharing a viral video, someone might say, “ICYMI, this cat can play the piano.”
  • A person might use ICYMI when reposting a tweet, saying, “ICYMI, this thread has some great insights.”

8. FWIW

This abbreviation is used to preface a statement or opinion that may not hold much value or importance, but the person still wants to share it. It is often used to provide additional perspective or information.

  • For example, “FWIW, I think we should consider a different approach.”
  • When discussing a movie, someone might say, “FWIW, I found the ending to be quite predictable.”
  • A person might use FWIW to share a personal experience, saying, “FWIW, I tried that product and it didn’t work for me.”

9. YMMV

This phrase is used to indicate that individual experiences or results may differ. It is often used when giving subjective opinions or sharing personal experiences.

  • For instance, “YMMV, but I found that restaurant to be overrated.”
  • When recommending a skincare product, someone might say, “YMMV, but this moisturizer worked wonders for my dry skin.”
  • A person might use YMMV when discussing the effectiveness of a workout routine, saying, “YMMV, but I didn’t see much progress with that program.”

10. TTYL

This acronym is used to indicate that the person will be ending the conversation or communication for now, but intends to reconnect or continue the conversation at a later time.

  • For example, “I need to go now. TTYL!”
  • When ending a phone call, someone might say, “Alright, TTYL.”
  • A person might use TTYL in a text message, saying, “I have to run some errands. TTYL!”

11. AKA

This abbreviation is used to introduce an alternative name or alias for someone or something. It is commonly used when referring to a person’s nickname or a different name for a place or thing.

  • For example, “Michael Jordan, AKA Air Jordan, dominated the basketball court.”
  • In a discussion about cities, someone might say, “New York City, AKA the Big Apple, is famous for its vibrant culture.”
  • A user might comment on a post, “AKA stands for ‘Also Known As’.”

12. IDK

This abbreviation is used to express uncertainty or lack of knowledge about a particular topic. It is often used in casual conversations or online discussions.

  • For instance, someone might ask, “What’s the capital of Australia?” and receive the response, “IDK, I’m not sure.”
  • In a group chat, a person might say, “IDK, let me look it up.”
  • A user might comment on a post, “IDK the answer to that question.”

13. NVM

This abbreviation is used to indicate that something previously mentioned is no longer relevant or important. It is commonly used to retract a statement or dismiss a topic.

  • For example, someone might say, “I found my keys. NVM!”
  • In a text conversation, a person might send, “Can you pick up some milk on your way home? Actually, NVM, I’ll do it.”
  • A user might comment on a post, “NVM, I just found the information I was looking for.”

14. SMH

This abbreviation is used to express disapproval, disappointment, or disbelief in something. It is often used in response to a foolish or frustrating situation.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I can’t believe they canceled the concert. SMH.”
  • In a text conversation, a person might send, “My boss just asked me to work overtime again. SMH.”
  • A user might comment on a post, “SMH at the ignorance displayed in this article.”

15. IMHO

This abbreviation is used to preface a statement or opinion with a sense of modesty or humility. It is commonly used in online discussions or social media posts.

  • For example, someone might say, “IMHO, the new album is their best work yet.”
  • In a comment thread, a person might write, “IMHO, the movie was overrated.”
  • A user might reply to a post, “IMHO, this is the best solution to the problem.”

16. TL;DR

This is used to summarize a long piece of text or information. It is often used when someone wants to provide a brief summary or explanation of a lengthy article or post.

  • For example, “TL;DR: The article discusses the impact of social media on mental health.”
  • In a comment thread, a user might say, “TL;DR version: The study found no significant difference in test scores.”
  • Another user might provide a summary by saying, “TL;DR: The movie is a gripping thriller with unexpected plot twists.”

17. ROFL

This acronym is used to express extreme amusement or laughter. It is often used in text messages or online conversations to indicate that something is incredibly funny.

  • For instance, “That joke had me ROFL!”
  • In response to a funny video, someone might comment, “ROFL, I can’t stop laughing.”
  • A user might share a hilarious meme and write, “ROFL, this is too good!”

18. BRB

This is used to indicate that the person will be away from the conversation or activity temporarily, but will return shortly. It is commonly used in online chats or text messages.

  • For example, “I need to grab a drink, BRB!”
  • During an online gaming session, a player might say, “BRB, need to answer the door.”
  • A person in a group chat might write, “BRB, just need to use the restroom.”

19. GTG

This is used to indicate that the person needs to leave or end the conversation. It is often used when someone has to go or has other commitments.

  • For instance, “Sorry, GTG. Talk to you later!”
  • In a text message, someone might say, “I’m running late, GTG now.”
  • A person in a group chat might write, “GTG, have a meeting to attend.”

20. LMK

This is used to ask someone to inform or update you about something. It is often used when you want to express your interest in receiving information or updates.

  • For example, “If you have any questions, LMK!”
  • In a text message, someone might say, “LMK when you’re free to meet up.”
  • A person might comment on a social media post, “LMK if you find out the answer.”

21. WBU

This acronym is used to ask someone about their thoughts, opinions, or experiences. It is often used in online conversations or text messages.

  • For example, a person might ask, “Just finished watching a movie, it was amazing! WBU?”
  • In a group chat, someone might say, “I’m going to the beach this weekend. WBU guys?”
  • Another person might post, “Just got back from a vacation. WBU? Any travel plans?”

22. IDC

This abbreviation is used to express indifference or lack of interest in a particular topic or situation. It is often used in informal conversations or online discussions.

  • For instance, someone might say, “You can choose the restaurant for dinner. IDC.”
  • In a group chat, a person might comment, “They changed the date of the party. IDC, I wasn’t planning to go anyway.”
  • Another person might post, “IDC about the latest celebrity gossip. It’s not important to me.”

23. WRT

This abbreviation is used to introduce a topic or provide context in relation to something else. It is often used in formal or professional writing.

  • For example, a person might write, “WRT your previous email, I have some additional information to share.”
  • In a business meeting, someone might say, “WRT the budget proposal, we need to make some adjustments.”
  • Another person might comment, “WRT the recent news, I think we should reconsider our strategy.”

24. TTYD

This acronym is used to indicate that the person will talk to the recipient at a later time. It is often used in text messages or online conversations.

  • For instance, someone might write, “I have to go now. TTYD!”
  • In a group chat, a person might comment, “I’m busy right now. TTYD when I’m free.”
  • Another person might post, “Leaving work. TTYD when I get home.”

25. IANAL

This acronym is used to clarify that the person providing information or advice is not a legal professional. It is often used in online discussions or forums.

  • For example, a person might write, “IANAL, but I think you should consult a lawyer for legal advice.”
  • In a legal advice subreddit, someone might comment, “IANAL, but based on my research, you might have a strong case.”
  • Another person might post, “IANAL, but I believe there are specific laws that apply in this situation.”

26. ASAP

This acronym is used to convey the urgency of completing a task or responding to a request. It implies that the action should be taken immediately or with the utmost urgency.

  • For instance, a boss might say, “I need that report ASAP.”
  • In a text message, someone might write, “Can you pick up some groceries for dinner ASAP?”
  • A teacher might tell a student, “Please turn in your homework ASAP.”

27. ETA

This acronym is used to indicate the expected time of arrival for a person or object. It is commonly used in transportation or logistics contexts.

  • For example, a friend might ask, “What’s your ETA? I want to know when to expect you.”
  • A delivery driver might communicate, “My ETA is 30 minutes. I’ll be there soon.”
  • In a travel itinerary, the airline might provide the ETA for each leg of the journey.
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28. TBA

This acronym is used when the details or information about a particular event or situation are not yet determined or ready to be disclosed. It indicates that the information will be provided at a later time.

  • For instance, a conference organizer might say, “The keynote speaker is still TBA. We’ll announce it soon.”
  • A movie studio might release a teaser trailer with the TBA release date, creating anticipation.
  • In a concert lineup, some performers might be listed as TBA until they are confirmed.

29. TBD

Similar to TBA, this acronym is used when the outcome or decision about a particular matter is not yet known or settled. It indicates that the decision or resolution will be made at a later time.

  • For example, a project manager might say, “The budget for this project is still TBD. We’re waiting for approval.”
  • A sports team might have TBD as the opponent for a future game until the schedule is finalized.
  • In a meeting agenda, some topics might be listed as TBD until they are assigned or confirmed.

30. FYA

This acronym is used to bring attention to a specific task or request that requires action from the recipient. It is often used in professional or formal settings to indicate that the recipient should take action based on the information provided.

  • For instance, a supervisor might send an email with the subject line “FYA: Revised Project Timeline” to indicate that the recipient should review and act on the updated timeline.
  • In a work collaboration tool, a team member might assign a task to another team member with the comment “FYA: Please review and provide feedback.”
  • A manager might leave a sticky note on an employee’s desk with the message “FYA: Sign and return this document by end of day.”
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31. NBD

This acronym is used to convey that something is not a big deal or not worth worrying about. It is often used to downplay a situation or to reassure someone.

  • For example, if someone apologizes for a minor inconvenience, you might respond with “NBD, it happens.”
  • If someone asks for a favor and you’re happy to help, you could say “Sure, NBD!”
  • When someone thanks you for something small, you might respond with “NBD, happy to help.”

32. ILY

This abbreviation is used to express love or affection. It is commonly used in text messages or social media posts to convey strong feelings towards someone.

  • For instance, you might send “ILY” to your significant other to express your love for them.
  • When a parent wants to show their love for their child, they might text “ILY” to them.
  • Friends might use “ILY” to express their deep friendship and care for each other.

33. OMG

This acronym is used to express surprise, shock, or excitement. It is commonly used in text messages or social media posts to convey strong emotions.

  • For example, if someone shares exciting news, you might respond with “OMG, that’s amazing!”
  • When someone tells you something shocking, you might react with “OMG, I can’t believe it.”
  • If someone sends you a funny video, you might reply with “OMG, that’s hilarious!”

34. BFF

This abbreviation is used to refer to a close friend or best friend. It signifies a deep and lasting friendship between two individuals.

  • For instance, if you have a friend you’ve known since childhood and have a strong bond with, you might refer to them as your “BFF”.
  • When introducing your best friend to someone, you might say “This is my BFF, we’ve been friends for years.”
  • If someone asks who you would trust with your deepest secrets, you might say “My BFF, of course!”

35. WYD

This acronym is used to ask someone what they are currently doing or what they have planned. It is commonly used in text messages or online chats to initiate a conversation or show interest in someone’s activities.

  • For example, if you want to start a conversation with a friend, you might send them a message saying “Hey, WYD?”
  • If someone asks what you’re up to, you can reply with “WYD? Just hanging out at home.”
  • When planning a get-together, you might ask your friends “WYD this weekend? Let’s do something fun!”

36. HBU

This acronym is used to ask someone for their opinion or response to a question or statement. It is commonly used in text messages or online conversations.

  • For example, “I’m going to the party tonight. HBU?”
  • In a group chat, someone might ask, “I’m thinking of ordering pizza. HBU guys?”
  • A person might reply, “I’m not sure yet, HBU?”

37. B4N

This abbreviation is used to say goodbye temporarily. It is commonly used in text messages or online chats to indicate that the person will be leaving the conversation or signing off.

  • For instance, “I have to go now, B4N!”
  • Before leaving a group chat, someone might say, “I’ll talk to you all later, B4N!”
  • A person might send a quick message saying, “I’m going to bed, B4N.”

38. CUL8R

This shorthand phrase is used to say goodbye and indicate that the person will see the recipient at a later time. It is commonly used in text messages or online chats.

  • For example, “I have to run some errands now, CUL8R!”
  • Before leaving a friend’s house, someone might say, “Thanks for having me over, CUL8R!”
  • A person might send a quick message saying, “I’m off to work, CUL8R.”

39. TTFN

This acronym is used to say goodbye temporarily. It is a lighthearted and informal way to bid farewell to someone. It is commonly used in text messages or online chats.

  • For instance, “I’m going to take a nap, TTFN!”
  • Before ending a phone call, someone might say, “Alright, I’ll talk to you later, TTFN!”
  • A person might send a quick message saying, “I have a meeting now, TTFN.”

40. IMU

This abbreviation is used to express that the person misses the recipient. It is commonly used in text messages or online chats to convey affection or longing for someone’s presence.

  • For example, “I haven’t seen you in a while, IMU!”
  • When separated from a loved one, someone might send a message saying, “IMU so much.”
  • A person might express their feelings by saying, “Just wanted to let you know that IMU.”

41. BAE

This term is used to refer to a person’s significant other or someone they love and prioritize above all others. It emphasizes the importance and specialness of the relationship.

  • For example, “I can’t wait to see my bae tonight.”
  • A person might post a picture with their partner and caption it, “Date night with my bae.”
  • Another might say, “I’m so lucky to have found my bae, they make me so happy.”

42. HTH

This acronym is commonly used in online communication to indicate that the information being provided is intended to be helpful to the recipient.

  • For instance, if someone asks for advice on a forum, another user might respond with, “HTH, let me know if you have any other questions.”
  • In a chat conversation, one person might say, “I’m not sure about that, but I can look it up for you. HTH!”
  • A person might end an email with, “Let me know if you need any more information. HTH!”

43. ILYSM

This abbreviation is used to express deep affection and love for someone. It is often used in text messages or social media posts to convey strong emotions.

  • For example, a person might text their partner, “ILYSM, you mean the world to me.”
  • In a comment on a friend’s post, someone might write, “You’re amazing, ILYSM!”
  • A person might send a heartfelt message to a family member saying, “Just wanted to remind you how much I love you. ILYSM!”

44. TMI

This acronym is used to indicate that someone has shared more personal or intimate details than necessary or appropriate for the conversation.

  • For instance, if someone starts discussing their bathroom habits in a group chat, another person might respond with, “TMI, we don’t need to know that.”
  • In a discussion about a medical condition, someone might say, “Sorry, TMI, but I’ve been dealing with this issue for years.”
  • A person might share a funny story and add, “TMI, but it was too embarrassing not to share!”

45. YOLO

This phrase is used to encourage people to live life to the fullest and take risks because life is short and should be enjoyed.

  • For example, someone might post a picture of themselves skydiving with the caption, “YOLO, best experience ever!”
  • In a conversation about trying new things, someone might say, “You should definitely go for it, YOLO!”
  • A person might reflect on a spontaneous decision they made and say, “I don’t regret it, YOLO!”

46. FOMO

This refers to the feeling of anxiety or insecurity that arises when you believe others are having fun or experiencing something exciting without you. It often occurs when seeing social media posts or hearing about events or activities that you were not a part of.

  • For instance, “I didn’t go to the party last night and now I have major FOMO.”
  • A friend might say, “You should have come to the concert with us. Don’t have FOMO!”
  • Someone might post on social media, “Everyone is at the beach today and I’m stuck at work. #FOMO”

47. TGIF

This phrase is used to express relief or excitement that the workweek is over and the weekend has arrived. It is often used to celebrate the start of the weekend and the freedom from work or school.

  • For example, “I had such a long week. TGIF!”
  • A colleague might say, “I can’t wait to relax this weekend. TGIF!”
  • Someone might post on social media, “Finally Friday! TGIF!”

48. DIY

This term refers to the practice of completing tasks or projects on your own without professional help. It is often associated with home improvement, crafts, and repairs, but can be applied to any task that you choose to tackle independently.

  • For instance, “I’m going to DIY my Halloween costume this year.”
  • A friend might say, “Instead of hiring a contractor, I’m going to DIY my kitchen remodel.”
  • Someone might post a tutorial on social media, “Learn how to DIY your own skincare products.”

49. OOTD

This is a term used to showcase and share your daily fashion choices. It typically involves posting a photo of your outfit on social media platforms like Instagram.

  • For example, “I love her OOTD. She always has great style.”
  • A fashion influencer might say, “Check out my latest OOTD on my blog.”
  • Someone might post their OOTD with the caption, “Feeling confident in this outfit. #OOTD”

50. WCW

This is a social media trend where people post about a woman they admire or have a crush on. It is typically done on Wednesdays and is a way to show appreciation and support for women.

  • For instance, “My WCW is my best friend. She’s always there for me.”
  • A celebrity might post about another celebrity, saying, “My WCW is this talented actress. She inspires me.”
  • Someone might post a photo of their mom with the caption, “My forever WCW. Love you, Mom!”

51. MCM

This is a social media trend where users post a photo or message about a man they have a crush on. It is often used with the hashtag #MCM.

  • For example, a user might post, “My #MCM is Chris Hemsworth because he’s so handsome and talented.”
  • Another might share a photo of their partner and say, “Can’t resist posting this #MCM of my amazing boyfriend.”
  • A celebrity might participate by posting a photo of their favorite actor and captioning it, “My #MCM goes to the incredibly talented Tom Hanks.”

52. AFAIC

This acronym is used to express one’s personal opinion or perspective on a matter.

  • For instance, someone might say, “AFAIC, pineapple belongs on pizza.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, a user might comment, “AFAIC, everyone should have the right to marry whoever they love.”
  • Another might express their preference by saying, “AFAIC, dogs are the best pets.”

53. TBF

This phrase is used to acknowledge a counterpoint or to provide a fair assessment of a situation.

  • For example, “TBF, she did put in a lot of effort into the project.”
  • In a debate, someone might say, “TBF, the other side does have some valid points.”
  • Another might use it to clarify, “TBF, I wasn’t aware of all the facts before making my judgment.”

54. AYOR

This phrase is used to caution someone that they proceed at their own peril or that there may be potential dangers or consequences.

  • For instance, a sign might say, “Swim at your own risk.”
  • In a discussion about a risky activity, someone might comment, “Jumping off that cliff is AYOR.”
  • Another might warn, “The path ahead is treacherous, so proceed AYOR.”