Top 98 Slang For Came From/Verb – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to describing where something originated or the action it came from, language can get pretty creative. Join us as we uncover some of the most interesting and fun slang terms used to express the concept of “came from” or the verb itself. Get ready to expand your vocabulary and impress your friends with these unique expressions!

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1. Hail from

This phrase is used to describe where someone or something is originally from. It implies a sense of pride or connection to a specific place or culture.

  • For example, “I hail from a small town in the Midwest.”
  • A person might say, “He hails from a long line of musicians.”
  • In a discussion about famous athletes, someone might mention, “Many professional basketball players hail from inner-city neighborhoods.”

2. Stem from

This phrase is used to describe the origin or source of something. It implies that a particular thing or idea has its roots in a specific cause or influence.

  • For instance, “Her fear of dogs stems from a childhood incident.”
  • In a debate about environmental issues, someone might argue, “Climate change stems from human activities.”
  • A person discussing language evolution might explain, “English stems from a combination of Germanic and Romance languages.”

3. Sprung from

This phrase is used to describe the sudden or unexpected origin or emergence of something. It implies a sense of surprise or spontaneity.

  • For example, “Her success as an artist sprung from a hobby.”
  • In a discussion about cultural trends, someone might say, “The punk movement in music and fashion sprung from a rebellious spirit.”
  • A person discussing technological advancements might mention, “Virtual reality technology has sprung from recent developments in computer graphics.”

4. Arise from

This phrase is used to describe the emergence or result of something. It implies a sense of causation or connection between different events or circumstances.

  • For instance, “Her success in business arose from her perseverance and hard work.”
  • In a discussion about social change, someone might argue, “Revolutionary movements often arise from widespread dissatisfaction.”
  • A person discussing scientific discoveries might explain, “New theories often arise from observations and experiments that challenge existing knowledge.”

5. Emerge from

This phrase is used to describe the appearance or manifestation of something. It implies a sense of visibility or recognition.

  • For example, “The truth emerged from the investigation.”
  • In a discussion about artistic movements, someone might say, “Impressionism emerged from a desire to capture the fleeting nature of light.”
  • A person discussing historical events might mention, “The Renaissance emerged from a period of cultural and intellectual revival.”

6. Descend from

This phrase refers to something that came from or originated from a particular source or ancestor.

  • For example, “The tradition of Thanksgiving descends from the harvest festivals celebrated by the Pilgrims.”
  • In a discussion about language, someone might say, “English descends from Old English, which in turn descends from Germanic languages.”
  • A historian might explain, “The ruling dynasty descends from a long line of monarchs who established their power centuries ago.”

7. Evolve from

This phrase describes something that has developed or changed over time from a previous form or state.

  • For instance, “Birds evolved from dinosaurs millions of years ago.”
  • In a conversation about technology, someone might say, “Smartphones have evolved from simple mobile phones.”
  • A biologist might explain, “The ability to fly evolved from adaptations in certain species of insects.”

8. Derive from

This phrase indicates that something has its origin or source from another thing or idea.

  • For example, “The word ‘alphabet’ derives from the Greek letters ‘alpha’ and ‘beta’.”
  • In a discussion about food, someone might say, “The flavor of this dish derives from a combination of spices and herbs.”
  • A linguist might explain, “English has many words that derive from Latin, due to the influence of the Roman Empire.”

9. Issue from

This phrase describes something that emerges or comes forth from a particular source or origin.

  • For instance, “Smoke issued from the chimney of the old house.”
  • In a conversation about literature, someone might say, “The author’s creativity issues from a deep well of imagination.”
  • A scientist might explain, “The research findings issued from years of careful experimentation and analysis.”

10. Flow from

This phrase indicates that something arises or originates from a particular source or cause.

  • For example, “A sense of calm and tranquility flows from spending time in nature.”
  • In a discussion about creativity, someone might say, “Innovative ideas often flow from a relaxed and open mindset.”
  • A philosopher might explain, “Ethical principles flow from a foundation of empathy and respect for others.”

11. Proceed from

This slang phrase is used to describe something that originates or comes from a particular source or starting point.

  • For example, a person might say, “The idea for this project proceeded from a conversation I had with a friend.”
  • In a discussion about the origins of a tradition, someone might say, “The tradition of exchanging gifts on Christmas proceeded from ancient pagan festivals.”
  • A writer might explain, “The inspiration for this story proceeds from my own personal experiences.”

12. Result from

This slang phrase is used to describe something that is caused or brought about by a particular event or action.

  • For instance, a person might say, “The success of this business venture resulted from years of hard work and dedication.”
  • In a discussion about the consequences of a decision, someone might say, “The financial crisis resulted from poor regulatory oversight.”
  • A scientist might explain, “The observed phenomenon results from a combination of factors, including temperature and pressure.”

13. Spawn from

This slang phrase is used to describe something that originates or is created as a result of another thing or situation.

  • For example, a person might say, “Many successful businesses have spawned from simple ideas.”
  • In a discussion about the evolution of a genre, someone might say, “The punk movement spawned from a dissatisfaction with mainstream music.”
  • A writer might explain, “The character in my novel spawns from my own imagination and personal experiences.”

14. Grow out of

This slang phrase is used to describe something that develops or evolves from a particular starting point or foundation.

  • For instance, a person might say, “Her passion for photography grew out of a childhood fascination with capturing moments.”
  • In a discussion about the evolution of a friendship, someone might say, “Our close bond grew out of shared experiences and mutual support.”
  • A musician might explain, “My musical style grew out of a combination of different genres and influences.”

15. Crop up from

This slang phrase is used to describe something that unexpectedly appears or arises from a particular situation or context.

  • For example, a person might say, “Issues and challenges often crop up from unforeseen circumstances.”
  • In a discussion about unexpected opportunities, someone might say, “New business ventures can crop up from chance encounters.”
  • A teacher might explain, “Interesting discussions and debates often crop up from classroom conversations.”

16. Surface from

This phrase is used to describe something that comes out or becomes visible from a hidden or underground place.

  • For example, “The submarine surfaced from the depths of the ocean.”
  • In a discussion about a new discovery, someone might say, “The truth finally surfaced from years of secrecy.”
  • A person describing the origin of a rumor might say, “The gossip surfaced from an anonymous source.”

17. Manifest from

This phrase is used to describe something that becomes evident or visible, often as a result of a hidden or underlying cause.

  • For instance, “Her talent for singing manifested from years of practice and dedication.”
  • In a discussion about a sudden change, someone might say, “His anger manifested from years of pent-up frustration.”
  • A person explaining the origin of a problem might say, “The issue manifested from a lack of communication.”

18. Spring up from

This phrase is used to describe something that suddenly appears or develops, often from a previous state or situation.

  • For example, “New businesses are springing up from the revitalization of the neighborhood.”
  • In a discussion about a new trend, someone might say, “This fashion style is springing up from street culture.”
  • A person describing the origin of a conflict might say, “The disagreement sprang up from a misunderstanding.”

19. Take root from

This phrase is used to describe something that has its origins or beginnings in a particular place, time, or situation.

  • For instance, “The tradition of Thanksgiving takes root from the early settlers in America.”
  • In a discussion about cultural influences, someone might say, “This dance style takes root from African traditions.”
  • A person explaining the origin of a belief might say, “The superstition takes root from ancient folklore.”

20. Be born from

This phrase is used to describe something that originates or has its beginnings in a particular place, time, or situation, often emphasizing the idea of creation or birth.

  • For example, “The idea for this invention was born from a moment of inspiration.”
  • In a discussion about a new artistic movement, someone might say, “This style of painting is born from the desire for self-expression.”
  • A person describing the origin of a cultural tradition might say, “This festival is born from ancient rituals and customs.”

21. Beget from

This phrase is used to describe something that originated or came from a particular source or origin. It implies a direct connection or lineage between the source and the derived item.

  • For example, “The idea for this novel was beget from a dream I had.”
  • A chef might say, “This recipe was beget from my grandmother’s traditional cooking.”
  • A songwriter might explain, “The melody for this song was beget from a childhood memory.”

22. Come out of

This phrase is used to describe something that originated or emerged from a particular place, situation, or source. It implies a sense of emergence or development from the source.

  • For instance, “Her success came out of years of hard work and dedication.”
  • A scientist might say, “This discovery came out of extensive research and experimentation.”
  • A cultural trend might be described as, “This fashion style came out of the punk movement in the 1970s.”

23. Have its roots in

This phrase is used to describe something that has its origins or beginnings in a particular place, culture, or historical context. It implies a sense of deep connection or foundation in the source.

  • For example, “This dance style has its roots in African tribal traditions.”
  • A language enthusiast might say, “English has its roots in Germanic languages.”
  • A historian might explain, “This political ideology has its roots in the Enlightenment era.”

24. Have its origins in

This phrase is used to describe something that has its beginnings or origins in a particular source or historical period. It implies a direct connection or influence from the source.

  • For instance, “This architectural style has its origins in ancient Greece.”
  • A philosopher might say, “Existentialism has its origins in the works of Kierkegaard and Nietzsche.”
  • A music historian might explain, “Jazz music has its origins in African American communities in the early 20th century.”

25. Have its beginnings in

This phrase is used to describe something that had its initial start or beginnings in a particular place, time, or context. It implies a sense of development or evolution from the starting point.

  • For example, “Her career as an artist had its beginnings in a small local gallery.”
  • A technological innovation might be described as, “This invention had its beginnings in a research laboratory.”
  • A social movement might have its beginnings in a specific event or protest, such as, “The civil rights movement had its beginnings in the Montgomery bus boycott.”

26. Have its source in

This phrase means that something comes from a particular place or thing. It suggests that the origin or beginning of something can be traced back to a specific source.

  • For example, “The idea for this product has its source in a conversation I had with a friend.”
  • A historian might say, “The conflict between these two countries has its source in a long history of territorial disputes.”
  • A scientist might explain, “The data we collected has its source in a series of experiments conducted over several months.”

27. Have its start in

This phrase means that something begins or originates in a particular place or time. It implies that the starting point or initial stage of something can be attributed to a specific source.

  • For instance, “Her career as a musician had its start in a small local band.”
  • A historian might say, “The Renaissance had its start in Italy during the 14th century.”
  • A business owner might explain, “Our company had its start in a small garage, where we developed our first product.”

28. Have its foundation in

This phrase means that something is built upon or rooted in a particular concept or idea. It suggests that the core or basis of something can be found in a specific source.

  • For example, “The principles of democracy have their foundation in the concept of individual freedom.”
  • A chef might say, “This recipe has its foundation in traditional Italian cuisine.”
  • A philosopher might argue, “Ethics has its foundation in the principles of morality and justice.”

29. Have its basis in

This phrase means that something is rooted or grounded in a particular concept or idea. It implies that the fundamental or underlying aspect of something can be traced back to a specific source.

  • For instance, “Her argument has its basis in scientific research and empirical data.”
  • A psychologist might say, “This theory of personality development has its basis in Freudian psychoanalysis.”
  • A historian might explain, “The conflict between these two nations has its basis in a long history of cultural differences.”

30. Have its inception in

This phrase means that something begins or starts from a particular point or moment. It suggests that the initial or beginning stage of something can be attributed to a specific source.

  • For example, “The idea for this project had its inception in a brainstorming session.”
  • A scientist might say, “Our research had its inception in a curiosity-driven question.”
  • A writer might explain, “The plot of my novel had its inception in a vivid dream I had.”

31. Have its creation in

This phrase is used to describe something that has its origins or beginnings in a particular place or time. It implies that something was created or started in a specific context or environment.

  • For example, “The idea for this new technology had its creation in a research lab.”
  • A historian might say, “The Renaissance had its creation in 14th-century Italy.”
  • In a discussion about cultural traditions, someone might mention, “This festival has its creation in ancient religious practices.”

32. Have its formation in

This phrase is used to indicate that something came into existence or was formed as a result of certain circumstances or factors. It suggests that something originated or developed from a specific situation or condition.

  • For instance, “The organization had its formation in response to a social issue.”
  • A biologist might explain, “This species had its formation in a unique ecological niche.”
  • In a conversation about language, someone might mention, “Slang words often have their formation in youth culture.”

33. Have its development in

This phrase is used to describe something that has undergone growth or progress over time. It implies that something has changed or advanced from an earlier state or stage.

  • For example, “Modern medicine had its development in ancient healing practices.”
  • A technology expert might say, “This software had its development in early computer programming.”
  • In a discussion about fashion, someone might mention, “This style had its development in the 1960s.”

34. Have its evolution in

This phrase is used to indicate that something has undergone a gradual change or transformation. It suggests that something has evolved or developed into a different form or state.

  • For instance, “The concept of democracy had its evolution in ancient Greece.”
  • A biologist might explain, “This species had its evolution in response to environmental changes.”
  • In a conversation about technology, someone might mention, “This device had its evolution from earlier prototypes.”

35. Have its growth in

This phrase is used to describe something that has experienced an increase or expansion. It implies that something has grown or developed in size, quantity, or importance.

  • For example, “The company had its growth in the global market.”
  • An economist might say, “This industry had its growth in response to consumer demand.”
  • In a discussion about urbanization, someone might mention, “This city had its growth in the post-war era.”

36. Have its emergence in

This phrase is used to describe something that originated or began from a particular place or time. It implies that the thing in question emerged or came into existence from a specific source or origin.

  • For example, “The tradition of wearing wedding rings has its emergence in ancient Egypt.”
  • A historian might explain, “The Renaissance had its emergence in Italy during the 14th century.”
  • Someone discussing the origins of a popular song might say, “This song has its emergence in the blues music of the early 20th century.”

37. Have its derivation in

This phrase is used to indicate that something is derived or originated from a particular source or origin. It implies that the thing in question has its roots or basis in a specific origin or derivation.

  • For instance, “The word ‘robot’ has its derivation in the Czech word ‘robota,’ meaning forced labor.”
  • A linguist might explain, “Many English words have their derivations in Latin or Greek.”
  • Someone discussing the origins of a recipe might say, “This dish has its derivation in traditional Indian cuisine.”

38. Have its outcome in

This phrase is used to describe something that results or leads to a particular outcome or consequence. It implies that the thing in question has a direct impact on the final result or outcome.

  • For example, “Poor financial decisions can have their outcome in bankruptcy.”
  • A coach might say, “Hard work and dedication have their outcome in success.”
  • Someone discussing the effects of climate change might argue, “Unchecked pollution will have its outcome in irreversible damage to the environment.”

39. Have its consequence in

This phrase is used to indicate that something leads or results in a particular consequence or outcome. It implies that the thing in question has a direct effect or impact on the resulting consequence.

  • For instance, “Neglecting your health can have its consequence in chronic illness.”
  • A social scientist might explain, “Socioeconomic factors have their consequence in educational achievement.”
  • Someone discussing the impact of technology might say, “The rise of smartphones has its consequence in increased connectivity but also decreased privacy.”

40. Have its production in

This phrase is used to describe something that is produced or created from a particular source or origin. It implies that the thing in question is the result of a specific production or creation process.

  • For example, “This documentary has its production in the collaboration of talented filmmakers.”
  • A chef might explain, “This dish has its production in locally sourced ingredients.”
  • Someone discussing the creation of a new product might say, “This innovative technology has its production in years of research and development.”

41. Have its appearance in

This phrase is used to describe something that originated or came from a particular place or source. It suggests that the thing in question made its first appearance in a specific context or setting.

  • For example, “The trend of skinny jeans had its appearance in the punk rock scene of the 1970s.”
  • When discussing the history of a particular cuisine, one might say, “The use of spices and herbs in Indian cooking had its appearance in ancient Ayurvedic practices.”
  • A music enthusiast might explain, “The blues genre had its appearance in African-American communities in the Deep South.”

42. Have its manifestation in

This phrase is used to describe something that takes form or becomes visible in a certain way or context. It suggests that the thing in question becomes apparent or tangible in a specific manner.

  • For instance, “The tension between the two characters had its manifestation in a heated argument.”
  • When discussing the impact of a historical event, one might say, “The social changes of the Civil Rights Movement had their manifestation in the desegregation of schools.”
  • A psychologist might explain, “Trauma can have its manifestation in various psychological symptoms such as anxiety or depression.”

43. Have its generation in

This phrase is used to describe something that arises or originates from a particular source or process. It suggests that the thing in question is generated or produced as a result of a specific cause or factor.

  • For example, “The idea for the novel had its generation in the author’s personal experiences.”
  • When discussing the development of a scientific theory, one might say, “Einstein’s theory of relativity had its generation in his thought experiments.”
  • A business analyst might explain, “New market opportunities can have their generation in emerging technologies or consumer trends.”

44. Have its birth in

This phrase is used to describe something that comes or originates from a particular place, time, or circumstance. It suggests that the thing in question had its beginning or origin in a specific context.

  • For instance, “The tradition of exchanging wedding rings had its birth in ancient Egypt.”
  • When discussing the origins of a language, one might say, “English has its birth in the Germanic languages of the early medieval period.”
  • A historian might explain, “The Renaissance had its birth in the cultural and intellectual revival of ancient Greek and Roman ideas.”

45. Have its rise in

This phrase is used to describe something that emerges or becomes prominent in a certain period or context. It suggests that the thing in question experienced a rise or increase in significance or popularity within a specific setting.

  • For example, “The popularity of social media had its rise in the early 2000s.”
  • When discussing the development of a musical genre, one might say, “Hip hop had its rise in the urban neighborhoods of New York City.”
  • A sociologist might explain, “The feminist movement had its rise in response to social and political inequalities faced by women.”

46. Have its upsurge in

This phrase is often used to describe something that becomes popular or widely known in a short period of time.

  • For example, “The dance move had its upsurge in the 1980s and quickly spread across the country.”
  • A music genre might have its upsurge in a particular city or region before gaining global recognition.
  • Someone might say, “This fashion trend is having its upsurge in the younger generation.”

47. Originate from

This phrase is used to describe something that has its source or starting point in a particular place or time.

  • For instance, “The tradition of exchanging wedding rings originated from ancient Egypt.”
  • A particular style of music might originate from a specific cultural movement.
  • Someone might say, “This recipe originates from my grandmother’s kitchen.”

48. Come from

This phrase is used to describe something that has its origin or source in a particular place, time, or situation.

  • For example, “The phrase ‘cool beans’ comes from American slang.”
  • A particular type of cuisine might come from a specific country or region.
  • Someone might say, “This idea comes from my own personal experiences.”

49. Grow from

This phrase is used to describe something that develops, evolves, or emerges from a previous state or situation.

  • For instance, “Her success grew from years of hard work and dedication.”
  • A business might grow from a small startup to a multinational corporation.
  • Someone might say, “This project grew from a simple idea into a complex undertaking.”

50. Develop from

This phrase is used to describe something that evolves, progresses, or advances from a previous state or situation.

  • For example, “The modern smartphone developed from early mobile phones.”
  • A scientific theory might develop from previous research and discoveries.
  • Someone might say, “This artwork developed from a series of sketches and experiments.”

51. Be from

This phrase is used to describe the place or source from which something or someone originates. It implies a sense of belonging or association with a specific location or background.

  • For example, “He is from New York City.” indicates that the person is originally from or associated with New York City.
  • In a conversation about cultural heritage, someone might say, “My family is from Italy.”
  • When discussing the origins of a particular dish, one might say, “Pizza is from Italy.”

52. Hail out of

This slang phrase means to come or originate from a specific place or background. It implies a sense of association or connection with that place.

  • For instance, “He hails out of Chicago.” indicates that the person is originally from or associated with Chicago.
  • In a discussion about famous musicians, someone might say, “The Beatles hailed out of Liverpool.”
  • When talking about the roots of a particular style of dance, one might say, “Hip-hop hails out of the Bronx.”

53. Emanate from

This phrase is used to describe something that comes or originates from a particular source or origin. It implies a sense of flow or emergence from that source.

  • For example, “The music emanates from the speakers.” indicates that the sound is coming out or flowing from the speakers.
  • In a conversation about creativity, someone might say, “Great ideas often emanate from collaboration.”
  • When discussing the influence of a historical figure, one might say, “His teachings emanated from ancient philosophies.”

54. Rise from

This slang phrase means to come or emerge from a specific place, situation, or background. It implies a sense of overcoming challenges or obstacles.

  • For instance, “She rose from poverty.” indicates that the person achieved success despite starting from a disadvantaged position.
  • In a discussion about personal growth, someone might say, “I rose from my failures and became a stronger person.”
  • When talking about the origin of a social movement, one might say, “The civil rights movement rose from a desire for equality.”

55. Spring from

This phrase is used to describe something that originates or arises from a particular source or cause. It implies a sense of sudden emergence or rapid development.

  • For example, “Her success sprang from hard work and dedication.” indicates that her success originated or arose from her efforts.
  • In a conversation about scientific discoveries, someone might say, “Many breakthroughs in medicine spring from years of research.”
  • When discussing the inspiration for a work of art, one might say, “The painting sprang from the artist’s love for nature.”

56. Be descended from

This phrase indicates that something or someone originated or has roots from a particular source or lineage.

  • For example, “She is descended from a long line of artists.”
  • In a discussion about family history, someone might say, “I am descended from Italian immigrants.”
  • When talking about the evolution of a species, a biologist might explain, “Birds are descended from dinosaurs.”

57. Be derived from

This phrase means that something is derived or originates from a specific source or origin.

  • For instance, “The word ‘bicycle’ is derived from the Latin words ‘bi-‘ meaning two and ‘cyclus’ meaning circle.”
  • In a cooking class, a chef might explain, “This recipe is derived from a traditional Italian dish.”
  • When discussing the development of a scientific theory, a researcher might say, “This theory is derived from years of empirical data.”

58. Stemmed from

This term indicates that something originated or has its roots from a particular source or origin.

  • For example, “Her passion for art stemmed from her childhood experiences.”
  • In a discussion about the origins of a cultural tradition, someone might say, “This festival stemmed from ancient religious practices.”
  • When explaining the cause of a problem, a scientist might state, “The issue stemmed from a faulty experiment design.”

59. Evolved from

This phrase suggests that something has developed or changed over time from a previous form or state.

  • For instance, “Birds evolved from dinosaurs over millions of years.”
  • In a discussion about technological advancements, someone might say, “Smartphones evolved from basic cellphones.”
  • When talking about the development of a language, a linguist might explain, “English evolved from Old English through various historical influences.”

60. Descended from

This term indicates that something or someone has a direct lineage or ancestry from a particular source or origin.

  • For example, “She is descended from a long line of royalty.”
  • In a discussion about family history, someone might say, “I am descended from Irish immigrants.”
  • When talking about the genetic inheritance of a trait, a biologist might state, “This characteristic is descended from a common ancestor.”

61. Emerged from

This phrase is used to describe something that came into existence or became known as a result of a specific event or situation.

  • For example, “The idea for this new product emerged from a brainstorming session.”
  • In a discussion about the origins of a cultural tradition, someone might say, “This tradition emerged from the blending of different cultural practices.”
  • A historian might explain, “The Renaissance era emerged from a period of cultural and intellectual revival in Europe.”

62. Spawned from

This term is used to indicate that something originated or was created as a result of a particular source or influence.

  • For instance, “This new genre of music spawned from the fusion of different musical styles.”
  • In a conversation about technological advancements, someone might say, “Virtual reality gaming has spawned from advancements in computer graphics.”
  • A writer might explain, “The idea for this novel spawned from a dream I had.”

63. Emanated from

This phrase is used to describe something that originated or came into existence from a specific source or cause.

  • For example, “The sound of laughter emanated from the room.”
  • In a discussion about the spread of a disease, someone might say, “The outbreak emanated from a contaminated water source.”
  • A scientist might explain, “The theory of relativity emanated from Albert Einstein’s groundbreaking work.”

64. Derived from

This term is used to indicate that something came from or was influenced by a particular source or origin.

  • For instance, “The word ‘chocolate’ is derived from the Aztec word ‘xocoatl’.”
  • In a conversation about the development of a new product, someone might say, “The design of this smartphone is derived from consumer feedback.”
  • A linguist might explain, “English vocabulary is derived from a variety of languages, including Latin, French, and German.”

65. Rooted in

This phrase is used to describe something that has its origins or foundations in a particular place, time, or belief.

  • For example, “This tradition is rooted in ancient cultural practices.”
  • In a discussion about a political ideology, someone might say, “His beliefs are rooted in libertarian principles.”
  • A historian might explain, “The conflict between these two nations is rooted in a long history of territorial disputes.”

66. Born from

This phrase is used to describe something that has its roots or origins in a particular place or situation. It implies that something was created or developed as a result of a specific source or influence.

  • For example, “This dish is born from a fusion of different culinary traditions.”
  • A musician might say, “My love for music was born from listening to my parents’ vinyl collection.”
  • In a discussion about fashion trends, someone might comment, “This style was born from the streets of New York City.”

67. Grew out of

This expression suggests that something developed or emerged from a previous state or condition. It implies a natural progression or transformation over time.

  • For instance, “This organization grew out of a grassroots movement for social justice.”
  • A popular saying might be, “Great things often grow out of humble beginnings.”
  • In a conversation about language, someone might say, “Slang terms often grow out of specific subcultures.”

68. Sourced from

This phrase indicates that something was acquired or obtained from a specific origin or location. It implies that the source is responsible for providing the item or material.

  • For example, “The ingredients for this recipe are sourced from local farmers.”
  • A company might promote their products by saying, “Our materials are ethically sourced from sustainable suppliers.”
  • In a discussion about a research paper, someone might mention, “The data was sourced from various reliable sources.”

69. Gotten from

This expression signifies that something was obtained or received from a particular source or person. It suggests that the acquisition was intentional or purposeful.

  • For instance, “I’ve gotten a lot of good advice from my mentor.”
  • A traveler might say, “I got this souvenir from a small shop in Paris.”
  • In a conversation about knowledge, someone might mention, “I’ve gotten a lot of valuable information from books.”

70. Originated in

This phrase indicates that something had its beginnings or was first established in a specific place or time. It implies that the origin is significant and influential.

  • For example, “Jazz music originated in New Orleans in the early 20th century.”
  • A historian might say, “The Renaissance originated in Italy and had a profound impact on art and culture.”
  • In a discussion about cultural traditions, someone might mention, “This festival originated in ancient times and is still celebrated today.”

71. Brought forth from

This phrase is used to describe something that originated or was created from something else.

  • For example, “Her success in the music industry was brought forth from years of hard work and dedication.”
  • In a discussion about the evolution of technology, someone might say, “Smartphones were brought forth from the advancements in mobile communication.”
  • A writer might describe a character’s motivation by saying, “His determination was brought forth from a difficult childhood.”

72. Grew from

This phrase refers to something that developed or transformed from something else over time.

  • For instance, “Her successful business grew from a small startup she launched in her garage.”
  • In a conversation about cultural traditions, someone might say, “This holiday grew from ancient rituals and customs.”
  • A gardener might explain, “These beautiful flowers grew from tiny seeds planted months ago.”

73. Bred from

This phrase describes something that was created or developed from a specific source or origin.

  • For example, “This new breed of dog was bred from a mix of two different breeds.”
  • In a discussion about music genres, someone might say, “Hip-hop music was bred from a combination of various musical influences.”
  • A chef might explain, “This unique dish was bred from a fusion of different culinary traditions.”

74. Arose from

This phrase indicates that something came into existence or became apparent as a result of a particular situation or event.

  • For instance, “Her success in the business world arose from her ability to adapt to changing market trends.”
  • In a conversation about scientific discoveries, someone might say, “This theory arose from years of research and experimentation.”
  • A historian might explain, “The Renaissance period arose from a combination of cultural, artistic, and intellectual factors.”

75. Gained from

This phrase refers to something that was obtained or achieved as a result of a specific action or effort.

  • For example, “He gained valuable experience from working in a variety of different industries.”
  • In a discussion about personal growth, someone might say, “Wisdom is gained from life experiences and lessons learned.”
  • A student might explain, “I gained knowledge from studying for hours and attending lectures.”

76. Came about from

This phrase is used to indicate the source or origin of something. It implies that the subject or event in question was a result of a particular cause or circumstance.

  • For example, “The idea for the new product came about from a brainstorming session.”
  • A writer might explain, “The conflict in the story came about from a misunderstanding between the main characters.”
  • In a conversation about cultural traditions, someone might say, “This tradition came about from our ancestors’ beliefs and practices.”

77. Formed from

This phrase suggests that something was made or brought into existence by combining or shaping different elements or materials.

  • For instance, “The sculpture was formed from clay.”
  • A chef might describe a dish as, “This recipe is formed from a combination of fresh ingredients.”
  • In a discussion about language, someone might explain, “New words are often formed from the blending of existing words or borrowing from other languages.”

78. Resulted from

This phrase indicates that a particular outcome or consequence was caused by a specific action, event, or circumstance.

  • For example, “The accident resulted from a driver running a red light.”
  • A scientist might explain, “The observed phenomenon resulted from a combination of factors.”
  • In a discussion about economic trends, someone might say, “The recession resulted from a decline in consumer spending.”

79. Gotten out of

This phrase suggests that someone has managed to avoid or evade a situation or responsibility.

  • For instance, “He got out of doing his homework by pretending to be sick.”
  • A person might say, “I’m trying to get out of attending the meeting by scheduling a conflicting appointment.”
  • In a conversation about avoiding a difficult conversation, someone might advise, “Don’t try to get out of it, it’s better to address the issue directly.”

80. Came out of

This phrase implies that something or someone has emerged or appeared from a particular place or situation.

  • For example, “A rabbit came out of the bushes.”
  • A writer might describe a character as, “She came out of her shell and became more confident.”
  • In a discussion about the origins of a musical genre, someone might say, “Jazz came out of the African American communities in the early 20th century.”

81. Developed out of

This phrase describes the process of something coming into existence or being created from a previous state or idea. It implies that the new thing has evolved or grown from its original form.

  • For example, “The modern smartphone developed out of early cell phones and personal digital assistants.”
  • A historian might explain, “The Renaissance period developed out of the cultural and intellectual changes of the Middle Ages.”
  • In a discussion about language, someone might say, “English developed out of a combination of Germanic and Romance languages.”

82. Sprouted from

This term suggests that something has grown or originated from a particular source or idea, similar to a plant sprouting from the ground. It implies a sense of growth and natural development.

  • For instance, “The idea for the new product sprouted from a brainstorming session.”
  • In a conversation about music, someone might say, “Jazz sprouted from a combination of African and European musical traditions.”
  • A chef might explain, “This recipe sprouted from my grandmother’s traditional cooking techniques.”

83. Manifested from

This phrase conveys the idea that something has become visible, evident, or apparent as a result of a particular source or influence. It implies a sense of transformation or realization.

  • For example, “Her artistic talent manifested from years of practice and dedication.”
  • In a discussion about cultural movements, someone might say, “The counterculture of the 1960s manifested from a desire for social and political change.”
  • A spiritual teacher might explain, “Positive energy and abundance can manifest from a mindset of gratitude and positivity.”

84. Evolved out of

This term suggests a gradual process of change and adaptation from an earlier form or state. It implies that the new thing has undergone a transformation or evolution.

  • For instance, “Birds evolved out of reptilian ancestors over millions of years.”
  • In a discussion about technology, someone might say, “The internet evolved out of early computer networks.”
  • A biologist might explain, “The human eye evolved out of simpler light-sensitive structures in early organisms.”

85. Issued from

This phrase indicates that something has come forth or been produced from a particular source or origin. It implies a sense of emergence or creation.

  • For example, “The new policy issued from a series of research studies and recommendations.”
  • In a conversation about literature, someone might say, “Many great works of literature have issued from personal experiences and observations.”
  • A historian might explain, “The Magna Carta issued from a negotiation between King John and a group of rebellious barons.”

86. Brought about from

This phrase is used to describe something that originated or resulted from a specific cause or action.

  • For example, “The success of the project was brought about from years of hard work and dedication.”
  • In a discussion about a new invention, someone might say, “The idea was brought about from a problem I encountered in my daily life.”
  • A writer might explain, “The inspiration for the story was brought about from a vivid dream.”

87. Came forth from

This expression is used to indicate that something originated or appeared from a particular source or situation.

  • For instance, “His talent came forth from years of practice and determination.”
  • In a conversation about an artist, one might say, “Her unique style came forth from her experiences and emotions.”
  • A speaker might explain, “The truth came forth from the evidence presented during the trial.”

88. Resulting from

This phrase signifies that something is the consequence or outcome of a specific event or action.

  • For example, “The accident was resulting from the driver’s negligence.”
  • In a discussion about climate change, someone might say, “The increase in temperatures is resulting from human activities.”
  • A scientist might explain, “The observed phenomenon is resulting from a combination of factors.”

89. Grew up from

This expression is used to describe something that originated or developed from a specific source or environment.

  • For instance, “He grew up from a small town in the Midwest.”
  • In a conversation about a successful entrepreneur, one might say, “She grew up from a humble background and built a thriving business.”
  • A person might explain, “My love for music grew up from my parents’ influence.”

90. Arising from

This phrase indicates that something originated or came into existence as a result of a particular situation or circumstance.

  • For example, “The conflict arose from a misunderstanding between the two parties.”
  • In a discussion about a new scientific discovery, someone might say, “The breakthrough arose from years of research and experimentation.”
  • A historian might explain, “The cultural movement arose from the social and political changes of the time.”

91. Came into being from

This phrase is used to describe something that was formed or created as a result of something else.

  • For example, “The idea for the new product came into being from customer feedback.”
  • In a discussion about the evolution of technology, someone might say, “Smartphones came into being from the need for portable communication.”
  • A historian might explain, “The Renaissance came into being from a cultural and intellectual shift in Europe.”

92. Developed as a result of

This phrase is used to describe something that evolved or advanced because of a particular reason or factor.

  • For instance, “The new treatment for the disease developed as a result of years of research.”
  • In a conversation about the growth of a city, someone might say, “The downtown area developed as a result of increased tourism.”
  • A scientist might explain, “The theory of relativity developed as a result of Einstein’s groundbreaking work.”

93. Came to be from

This phrase is used to describe something that came into existence or originated from a particular source or circumstance.

  • For example, “The tradition of exchanging wedding rings came to be from ancient Roman customs.”
  • In a discussion about the origins of a language, someone might say, “English came to be from a combination of Germanic and Romance languages.”
  • A cultural anthropologist might explain, “Certain rituals and ceremonies came to be from religious beliefs and practices.”

94. Arose out of

This phrase is used to describe something that emerged or originated as a result of a specific situation or context.

  • For instance, “The conflict between the two countries arose out of territorial disputes.”
  • In a conversation about the development of a musical genre, someone might say, “Jazz arose out of the fusion of African and European musical traditions.”
  • A sociologist might explain, “Social movements often arise out of a collective dissatisfaction with existing systems or structures.”

95. Originated as

This phrase is used to describe something that had its beginnings or started as a specific thing or concept.

  • For example, “The game of basketball originated as a way to keep athletes active during the winter.”
  • In a discussion about the evolution of technology, someone might say, “The internet originated as a military research project.”
  • A historian might explain, “Democracy originated as a form of government in ancient Greece.”

96. Grew into

This phrase refers to something that has developed or transformed from a previous state or condition. It implies a gradual progression or expansion.

  • For example, “The small startup grew into a multinational corporation.”
  • In a discussion about personal growth, one might say, “I started out as a shy introvert, but I grew into a confident public speaker.”
  • A sports commentator might say, “He was a talented young player who grew into a superstar.”

97. Came up from

This phrase describes something that originated or emerged from a particular place or situation. It suggests a rise or ascent.

  • For instance, “He came up from a humble background and worked his way to success.”
  • In a conversation about cultural influences, one might say, “Hip-hop music came up from the streets of New York.”
  • A historian might explain, “The idea of democracy came up from ancient Greece.”

98. Brought into existence from

This phrase denotes something that has been brought into existence or formed from nothing. It implies the act of bringing something into being.

  • For example, “The artist brought into existence a beautiful sculpture from a block of marble.”
  • In a discussion about technological advancements, one might say, “The internet was brought into existence from a network of interconnected computers.”
  • A writer might describe a fictional world by saying, “The author brought into existence a vivid fantasy realm from their imagination.”
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