Top 51 Slang For Cash – Meaning & Usage

Cash is king, and knowing the right slang to talk about it can make you feel like a financial wizard. Whether you’re a money-savvy millennial or just looking to stay in the loop, we’ve got you covered with our comprehensive list of the top slang terms for cash. From “bread” to “dough,” we’ve got all the money lingo you need to sound like a pro in no time. So, buckle up and get ready to level up your financial vocabulary with us!

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1. Dough

This term refers to cash or money in general. It is often used in a casual or informal context.

  • For example, “I need some dough to pay for this concert ticket.”
  • A person might say, “I’m low on dough, so I can’t go out tonight.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might ask, “How much dough do you have saved up?”

2. Benjamins

This slang term specifically refers to one hundred dollar bills. It is derived from the portrait of Benjamin Franklin, which is featured on the front of the bill.

  • For instance, “He made it rain with Benjamins at the strip club.”
  • A person might say, “I just got my paycheck and it’s all Benjamins.”
  • In a discussion about wealth, someone might ask, “How many Benjamins does it take to feel rich?”

3. Cheddar

This term is slang for money, specifically referring to cash or wealth. It is often used in a playful or lighthearted manner.

  • For example, “I’m trying to save up some cheddar for a vacation.”
  • A person might say, “I need to find a side hustle to earn some extra cheddar.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might ask, “How much cheddar do you have in your bank account?”

4. Stacks

This slang term refers to bundles of cash, usually in the form of one hundred dollar bills. The term “stacks” implies a large amount of money.

  • For instance, “He pulled out a stack of cash to pay for the car.”
  • A person might say, “I need to hit the casino and win some stacks.”
  • In a discussion about wealth, someone might ask, “How many stacks does it take to be considered rich?”

5. Greenbacks

This slang term specifically refers to paper money, especially United States currency. The term “greenbacks” is derived from the green color of the bills.

  • For example, “He handed over a handful of greenbacks to pay for the meal.”
  • A person might say, “I need to stop by the bank and withdraw some greenbacks.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might ask, “How many greenbacks do you have in your wallet?”

6. C-notes

This term refers to one hundred-dollar bills, which feature the image of Benjamin Franklin. The “C” in “C-notes” stands for “centum,” the Latin word for “hundred.”

  • For example, “He paid for the car in C-notes.”
  • A person might say, “I need to withdraw some C-notes from the bank.”
  • Another might ask, “Do you have change for a C-note?”

7. Loot

In slang terms, “loot” refers to money or valuable items. It can also be used to describe the act of acquiring wealth or possessions.

  • For instance, “He made a lot of loot from his business.”
  • In a discussion about a successful heist, someone might say, “They got away with a lot of loot.”
  • A person might ask, “How much loot did you make from that job?”

8. Bread

This term is used to refer to money, with “bread” being a metaphorical representation of sustenance or livelihood.

  • For example, “He’s always looking for ways to make more bread.”
  • In a conversation about financial stability, someone might say, “I need to save up some bread.”
  • Another might comment, “He’s rolling in bread after winning the lottery.”

9. Bucks

This slang term is used to refer to dollars, with “bucks” being a casual way to represent money.

  • For instance, “That shirt costs fifty bucks.”
  • In a discussion about salary, someone might say, “I make a few hundred bucks a week.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you lend me a few bucks?”

10. Scratch

In slang terms, “scratch” is used as a synonym for money. It can also refer to earning or obtaining money.

  • For example, “He’s always looking for ways to make some scratch.”
  • In a conversation about financial struggles, someone might say, “I need to find a way to earn some scratch.”
  • Another might comment, “He’s got plenty of scratch to spare.”

11. Cheese

This term is often used to refer to cash or money in general. It can also be used to describe a large sum of money.

  • For example, “I need to save up some cheese for my vacation.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might say, “I’ve got some extra cheese to invest.”
  • A person might boast, “I just won a big cheese in the lottery!”

12. Coin

This term refers to physical currency, specifically coins. It can also be used more broadly to refer to money in general.

  • For instance, “I found a few coins in the couch cushions.”
  • In a discussion about saving money, someone might say, “Every coin counts.”
  • A person might complain, “I’m always short on coins when I need them for parking meters.”

13. Wad

A “wad” is a bundle or stack of cash, typically folded or rolled together. It can also refer to a large amount of money in general.

  • For example, “He pulled out a wad of cash to pay for dinner.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might say, “I’ve got a wad saved up for emergencies.”
  • A person might brag, “I just made a wad of cash from my latest business venture!”

14. Paper

This term is often used to refer to cash or money in general. It originates from the fact that paper currency is the most common form of physical money.

  • For instance, “I need to get some paper for the weekend.”
  • In a discussion about financial transactions, someone might say, “I prefer using paper over digital payments.”
  • A person might joke, “I’m always chasing that paper!”

15. Bank

This term is often used to refer to a large amount of money or wealth. It can also be used more broadly to refer to money in general.

  • For example, “He’s got so much bank, he could buy anything he wants.”
  • In a conversation about financial success, someone might say, “I’m trying to build up my bank.”
  • A person might envy, “I wish I had that kind of bank!”

16. Green

This term refers to cash or money, particularly in the form of paper currency. It is called “green” because most paper money is green in color.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need some green to pay for this concert ticket.”
  • In a conversation about finances, a person might ask, “How much green do you have in your wallet?”
  • A rapper might boast, “I’m making stacks of green from my latest album.”

17. Cashola

This slang term is a playful way to refer to cash or money. It is often used in a lighthearted or humorous context.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need some cashola to buy that new video game.”
  • In a conversation about splitting a bill, a person might joke, “Who’s got the cashola to cover this?”
  • A comedian might say, “I’m not in it for the fame, just the cashola.”

18. Moolah

This term is another slang word for cash or money. It is believed to have originated from the Irish word “mulla” which means “mule”. It is often used in a casual or informal context.

  • For example, someone might say, “I made a lot of moolah from my garage sale.”
  • In a conversation about financial goals, a person might say, “I’m saving up moolah for a vacation.”
  • A business owner might advertise, “Earn some extra moolah by joining our affiliate program.”

19. Skrilla

This slang term is used to refer to cash or money. It is believed to have originated from the word “scrilla” which means money or cash. It is often used in hip-hop or urban contexts.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need some skrilla to pay my bills.”
  • In a conversation about making a purchase, a person might ask, “How much skrilla do you want for that?”
  • A rapper might boast, “I’m swimming in skrilla from my latest album.”

20. Dead Presidents

This term refers to paper currency, particularly U.S. dollar bills which feature the faces of deceased U.S. presidents. It is called “dead presidents” because the presidents depicted on the bills are no longer alive.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need some dead presidents to buy that new gadget.”
  • In a conversation about financial struggles, a person might say, “I’m tired of working so hard just to earn some dead presidents.”
  • A history enthusiast might comment, “Those dead presidents on our currency played significant roles in shaping our nation.”

21. Moola

A slang term for cash or money. It is often used to refer to a large amount of money.

  • For example, “I need to save up some moola for my vacation.”
  • A person might say, “I won a lot of moola at the casino last night.”
  • In a discussion about finances, someone might mention, “I need to earn some extra moola to pay off my debts.”

22. Clams

A slang term for money, specifically referring to dollars. It is believed to have originated from the term “clams” being used to describe the shape of old silver dollars.

  • For instance, “I just made 100 clams from selling my old clothes.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t afford that right now, I’m short on clams.”
  • In a conversation about budgeting, someone might suggest, “Cutting back on unnecessary expenses can help you save more clams.”

23. Dinero

A Spanish slang term for money. It is often used in English-speaking countries to refer to cash.

  • For example, “I need to make some extra dinero to pay my bills.”
  • A person might say, “I found a way to make quick dinero online.”
  • In a discussion about financial goals, someone might mention, “I want to save up enough dinero to buy a new car.”

24. G’s

A slang term for a thousand dollars. It is derived from the word “grand,” which is often used to refer to a thousand dollars.

  • For instance, “I just made 5 G’s from that business deal.”
  • A person might say, “I need to save up 10 G’s for a down payment on a house.”
  • In a conversation about expensive purchases, someone might mention, “That car costs 50 G’s.”

25. Grand

A slang term for one thousand dollars. It is often used to refer to a large sum of money.

  • For example, “I just won a grand in the lottery.”
  • A person might say, “I need to save up 2 grand for my vacation.”
  • In a discussion about financial goals, someone might mention, “I want to save up 10 grand by the end of the year.”

26. Bones

This is a slang term for cash or money. It can refer to both paper currency and coins.

  • For example, “I need to save up some bones before I can go on vacation.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t go out tonight, I’m low on bones.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might ask, “How many bones do you have in your bank account?”

27. Smackers

This is a slang term for dollars, specifically referring to paper currency.

  • For instance, “I just got paid, now I have a bunch of smackers.”
  • A person might say, “I need to earn some smackers to pay my bills.”
  • In a discussion about the cost of something, someone might ask, “How many smackers does that cost?”

28. Simoleons

This is a slang term for money, often used to refer to a significant amount of cash.

  • For example, “He just won the lottery and now he has a ton of simoleons.”
  • A person might say, “I need to save up some simoleons before I can buy a new car.”
  • In a conversation about financial success, someone might say, “She’s rolling in simoleons after starting her own business.”

29. Lucre

This is a slang term for money or profit, often used in a negative or disapproving context.

  • For instance, “He’s only interested in the lucre, not the quality of his work.”
  • A person might say, “I’m not in it for the lucre, I just want to make a difference.”
  • In a discussion about the ethics of business, someone might argue, “Too many companies prioritize lucre over the well-being of their employees.”

30. Wampum

This is a slang term for money or currency, particularly used in Native American and colonial contexts.

  • For example, “In the past, wampum beads were used as a form of currency.”
  • A person might say, “I need to exchange my wampum for modern currency.”
  • In a conversation about historical trade, someone might ask, “How much wampum would a beaver pelt be worth?”

31. Bacon

This term is slang for money, often used to refer to a large amount of cash. It can also be used to describe someone’s salary or income.

  • For example, “I need to save up some bacon before I can go on vacation.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might say, “He’s making some serious bacon with his new job.”
  • A person might brag, “I just got my bacon for the month, time to treat myself to something nice.”

32. Cake

This slang term is used to refer to money, often in a positive or desirable context. It can also be used to describe someone who is wealthy or has a lot of money.

  • For instance, “I just got a promotion, now I’m making cake.”
  • In a discussion about financial goals, someone might say, “I’m working hard to stack up my cake.”
  • A person might comment, “She’s always flaunting her designer clothes, she must have cake.”

33. Jack

This term is slang for money, derived from the phrase “jack of all trades,” which refers to someone who is skilled in many areas. It can also be used to describe stealing or taking something without permission.

  • For example, “I need some extra jack to pay my bills this month.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might say, “He’s always finding ways to make jack.”
  • A person might warn, “Don’t mess with him, he’ll jack your wallet if you’re not careful.”

34. Stash

This term refers to a hidden supply of cash or valuables. It can also be used to describe a secret hiding place for money or other items.

  • For instance, “I keep a stash of emergency cash in case of unexpected expenses.”
  • In a discussion about personal finance, someone might say, “It’s always a good idea to have a stash for emergencies.”
  • A person might ask, “Where’s your stash? I need to borrow some money.”

35. Bankroll

This term is slang for a large sum of money, often used to fund a project or venture. It can also refer to someone’s financial support or backing.

  • For example, “I need a bankroll to start my own business.”
  • In a conversation about investments, someone might say, “He’s got the bankroll to take risks.”
  • A person might comment, “I’m looking for a partner with a bankroll to invest in real estate.”

36. Coinage

This term refers to the physical form of money, such as coins or paper bills.

  • For example, “The museum had a collection of ancient coinage from different civilizations.”
  • In a discussion about the history of money, one might mention, “Coinage played a significant role in the development of trade.”
  • A person might say, “I need some coinage for the parking meter.”

37. Filthy lucre

This phrase is often used to describe money that is obtained in a dishonest or immoral way.

  • For instance, “He was willing to do anything for filthy lucre.”
  • In a conversation about corruption, one might say, “Some politicians are only interested in filthy lucre.”
  • A person might criticize someone’s actions by saying, “They sold their integrity for a bit of filthy lucre.”

38. Green stuff

This term is a casual way to refer to money, particularly cash.

  • For example, “I need some green stuff to pay for this.”
  • In a discussion about financial matters, someone might say, “You can’t buy happiness with green stuff.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have any green stuff on you?”

This phrase refers to any form of money that is recognized by law and can be used to settle a debt.

  • For instance, “The government issued a statement confirming that the new currency is legal tender.”
  • In a conversation about international travel, one might say, “Make sure to carry some local currency as legal tender.”
  • A person might ask, “Is Bitcoin considered legal tender?”

40. Payola

This term is used to describe the act of giving or receiving a bribe or illegal payment, especially in the music industry.

  • For example, “The DJ was involved in a payola scandal.”
  • In a discussion about corruption, one might say, “Payola undermines the integrity of the music industry.”
  • A person might warn someone by saying, “Be careful not to get involved in payola schemes.”

41. Rainy day fund

A “rainy day fund” refers to money set aside for unexpected expenses or emergencies. It is a financial safety net that provides peace of mind and helps individuals handle unforeseen circumstances.

  • For example, “I always make sure to contribute to my rainy day fund every month.”
  • A financial advisor might recommend, “It’s important to have at least three to six months’ worth of living expenses in your rainy day fund.”
  • Someone might say, “I had to dip into my rainy day fund when my car broke down.”

42. Cabbage

“Cabbage” is a slang term for money. It is often used in a casual or playful manner to refer to cash or wealth.

  • For instance, “I need to save up some cabbage before I can go on vacation.”
  • A person might say, “I’m going to make some serious cabbage from this business venture.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might ask, “How much cabbage do you have saved up?”

43. Guap

“Guap” is a slang term for money, specifically a large amount of it. It is often used to describe wealth or financial success.

  • For example, “He’s rolling in guap after winning the lottery.”
  • A person might say, “I’m trying to stack up my guap by working overtime.”
  • In a discussion about expensive purchases, someone might comment, “That car must have cost a ton of guap.”

44. Mula

“Mula” is a slang term for money. It is derived from the Spanish word “mula,” which means “mule.” The term is often used in a playful or lighthearted manner to refer to cash.

  • For instance, “I need to find a way to make some quick mula.”
  • A person might say, “I’m saving up my mula for a down payment on a house.”
  • In a conversation about financial goals, someone might ask, “How much mula do you need to retire comfortably?”

45. Payday

“Payday” refers to the day on which an individual receives their wages or salary. It is a term commonly used to signify the arrival of income.

  • For example, “I can’t wait for payday so I can pay my bills.”
  • A person might say, “I’m going to treat myself to something nice on payday.”
  • In a conversation about budgeting, someone might comment, “I always allocate a portion of my paycheck for savings on payday.”

46. Gwap

This term is a slang word for money. It is often used to refer to a large amount of money or wealth.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just made a gwap from my latest business venture.”
  • In a conversation about financial goals, a person might say, “I’m working hard to earn that gwap.”
  • A rapper might boast, “I’m swimming in gwap, living the high life.”

47. Breadwinner

This term refers to the person in a household who earns the majority of the money to support the family or household expenses.

  • For instance, someone might say, “My dad is the breadwinner in our family.”
  • In a discussion about gender roles, someone might argue, “Being a breadwinner is not limited to men.”
  • A person might seek advice, saying, “I’m struggling with the pressure of being the breadwinner. How can I manage it better?”

48. Finances

This term encompasses all aspects of managing money, including income, expenses, investments, and savings.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to take a closer look at my finances and create a budget.”
  • In a conversation about financial planning, a person might ask, “How can I improve my finances for the future?”
  • A financial advisor might offer tips, saying, “It’s important to have a clear understanding of your finances to make informed decisions.”

49. Jackpot

This term is often used to describe a large or unexpected financial gain or success.

  • For instance, someone might exclaim, “I hit the jackpot with this investment!”
  • In a discussion about gambling, a person might say, “I’m feeling lucky tonight. I’m going for the jackpot.”
  • A lottery winner might share their excitement, saying, “I can’t believe I won the jackpot. My life is about to change!”

50. Paycheck

This term refers to the money received by an employee as payment for their work. It is typically given in the form of a check or direct deposit on a regular basis.

  • For example, someone might say, “I can’t wait to receive my paycheck this week.”
  • In a conversation about job satisfaction, a person might say, “I work hard and deserve a fair paycheck.”
  • A person might seek financial advice, saying, “How can I make the most of my paycheck and save for the future?”

51. Riches

This term refers to a large amount of money or valuable possessions. It is often used to describe someone who has a significant amount of wealth.

  • For example, “He inherited his family’s riches and became a millionaire.”
  • In a discussion about financial success, someone might say, “I’m striving to achieve riches and financial independence.”
  • A person might refer to a luxurious lifestyle as “living in the lap of riches.”
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