Top 38 Slang For Caveat – Meaning & Usage

Caveat emptor, caveat lector, caveat venditor – the world of caveats is filled with Latin phrases that add a touch of mystery and sophistication to everyday conversations. But fear not, our team has delved deep into the realm of caveats to bring you a list of the top slang terms that will have you navigating legal and everyday situations like a pro. Get ready to level up your language game and impress your friends with these essential phrases!

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1. Heads up

This phrase is used to warn or inform someone about a situation or impending event. It is a way of giving someone a heads up or advance notice.

  • For example, “Heads up, there’s a big pothole in the road ahead.”
  • In a sports game, a coach might yell, “Heads up!” to warn a player of an incoming ball.
  • A friend might say, “Heads up, the restaurant we’re going to has a dress code.”

2. Watch out

This phrase is used to warn someone to be careful or to pay attention to their surroundings. It is a way of alerting someone to a potential danger or hazard.

  • For instance, “Watch out for that slippery patch on the sidewalk.”
  • A parent might say, “Watch out for cars when crossing the street.”
  • A friend might warn, “Watch out, there’s a wasp flying around.”

3. Be aware

This phrase is used to advise someone to have knowledge or understanding of a particular situation or fact. It is a way of reminding someone to be conscious or mindful of something.

  • For example, “Be aware that the store closes early today.”
  • In a safety briefing, an instructor might say, “Be aware of your surroundings at all times.”
  • A coworker might remind, “Be aware that the meeting has been rescheduled.”

4. FYI

This acronym is used to inform someone about something or to provide them with a piece of information. It is often used in written communication to quickly convey information.

  • For instance, “FYI, the deadline for the project has been moved to next week.”
  • In an email, someone might write, “FYI, the office will be closed for renovations next month.”
  • A manager might leave a note saying, “FYI, there’s a staff meeting tomorrow morning.”

5. Just so you know

This phrase is used to inform someone about something or to let them know a particular piece of information. It is a way of sharing information in a casual or friendly manner.

  • For example, “Just so you know, I won’t be able to attend the meeting tomorrow.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “Just so you know, the restaurant we’re going to is cash only.”
  • A friend might inform, “Just so you know, the movie starts at 7:30.”

6. Keep in mind

This phrase is used to remind someone to consider or be aware of something before making a decision or taking action.

  • For example, “When planning your vacation, keep in mind that it’s hurricane season in that area.”
  • In a discussion about budgeting, someone might say, “When buying a car, keep in mind the cost of maintenance and repairs.”
  • A teacher might advise their students, “When writing your essays, keep in mind the importance of proper citation and avoiding plagiarism.”

7. Note that

This phrase is used to draw attention to a specific piece of information or to emphasize a point.

  • For instance, “Note that the deadline for this assignment is next Friday.”
  • In a set of instructions, it might say, “Note that the product should not be used near open flames.”
  • A presenter might say, “Before we begin, note that the information in this presentation is confidential.”

8. Be advised

This phrase is used to give someone a warning or advice about a particular situation.

  • For example, “Be advised that there is heavy traffic on the highway.”
  • In a military context, a commander might say, “Be advised, we have enemy forces approaching from the east.”
  • A doctor might warn their patient, “Be advised that this medication may cause drowsiness.”

9. Take heed

This phrase is used to urge someone to listen to or consider a warning or advice.

  • For instance, “Take heed of the signs warning of slippery floors.”
  • In a safety briefing, someone might say, “Take heed of the evacuation procedures in case of an emergency.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “Take heed of your teacher’s instructions and do your best in school.”

10. Caution

This term is used to alert someone of a potential danger or to advise them to proceed with care.

  • For example, “Caution: Wet floor.”
  • In a discussion about investing, someone might say, “Exercise caution when investing in high-risk stocks.”
  • A hiker might see a sign that says, “Caution: Steep trail ahead, use proper footwear and take breaks if needed.”

11. Reminder

A reminder is a gentle heads up or warning to remember something or take action. It serves as a prompt to keep something in mind or not to forget about it.

  • For example, “Just a reminder, the meeting is at 2 pm tomorrow.”
  • A friend might send a text saying, “Reminder: don’t forget to pick up milk on your way home.”
  • A coworker might leave a sticky note on your desk with a reminder about a deadline.
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12. Alert

An alert is a warning or notification to be cautious or aware of a potential danger or situation. It serves as a prompt to pay attention and take necessary precautions.

  • For instance, “We received an alert about severe weather approaching.”
  • A security system might sound an alert if someone tries to break into a house.
  • A news app might send an alert about breaking news or a developing story.

13. Be cautious

To be cautious means to be careful, wary, or prudent in order to avoid potential risks or dangers. It is a reminder to proceed with care and take necessary precautions.

  • For example, “When walking alone at night, it’s important to be cautious and aware of your surroundings.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “Be cautious when crossing the street and look both ways.”
  • A hiker might advise their companions, “The trail can be slippery, so let’s be cautious and watch our step.”

14. Be careful

To be careful means to take precautions, pay attention, and avoid potential harm or mistakes. It is a reminder to be mindful of one’s actions and surroundings.

  • For instance, “Be careful when handling hot objects to avoid burns.”
  • A teacher might say to their students, “Be careful with the scissors and use them responsibly.”
  • A driver might remind themselves, “I need to be careful and follow the speed limit.”

15. Be mindful

To be mindful means to be attentive, aware, and conscious of one’s thoughts, actions, and surroundings. It is a reminder to stay present and observant.

  • For example, “Be mindful of your words and how they may affect others.”
  • A yoga instructor might say, “During this practice, be mindful of your breath and body.”
  • A security guard might remind their team, “Stay mindful and keep an eye out for any suspicious activity.”

16. Be forewarned

This phrase is used to warn someone about a potential problem or danger that they should be aware of.

  • For example, “Be forewarned, the hike is strenuous and not suitable for beginners.”
  • Before sharing a spoiler, someone might say, “Be forewarned, this will give away the ending of the movie.”
  • A friend might advise, “Be forewarned, the restaurant has slow service, so be prepared to wait.”

17. Be forearmed

This phrase means to be prepared or equipped with knowledge or resources in order to deal with a situation.

  • For instance, “Be forearmed with information before going into the meeting.”
  • Before a job interview, someone might say, “Be forearmed with questions to ask the interviewer.”
  • A teacher might advise their students, “Be forearmed with extra pencils and paper for the exam.”

18. Take note

This phrase is used to draw someone’s attention to something important or noteworthy.

  • For example, “Take note of the key points in the presentation.”
  • Before giving instructions, a coach might say, “Take note of the proper technique.”
  • A teacher might remind their students, “Take note of the due date for the assignment.”

19. Just a heads-up

This phrase is used to give someone a friendly or informal warning or notification about something.

  • For instance, “Just a heads-up, there’s a traffic jam on the highway.”
  • Before sharing sensitive information, someone might say, “Just a heads-up, this is confidential.”
  • A colleague might give a heads-up about a meeting, saying, “Just a heads-up, the meeting has been moved to a different location.”

20. Quick note

This phrase is used to indicate that someone is about to deliver a brief or concise message or piece of information.

  • For example, “Quick note, the office will be closed tomorrow.”
  • Before sending a short message, someone might say, “Quick note, I’ll be a few minutes late.”
  • A manager might leave a quick note for their team, saying, “Quick note, please remember to submit your reports by the end of the day.”

21. Important to note

This phrase is used to draw attention to a specific piece of information that should be kept in mind.

  • For example, “Before we start, it’s important to note that this data is preliminary.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might say, “It’s important to note that not everyone agrees with this viewpoint.”
  • A presenter might use this phrase to emphasize, “As we go through the slides, it’s important to note the key findings highlighted in red.”

22. Just a reminder

This phrase is used to politely bring something back to someone’s attention.

  • For instance, “Just a reminder, the deadline for submissions is tomorrow.”
  • In a group chat, someone might say, “Just a reminder, we’re meeting at 6 pm tonight.”
  • A supervisor might send an email with the subject line “Just a reminder” to ensure everyone remembers an upcoming meeting.
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23. Important to mention

This phrase is used to highlight information that should be included or considered.

  • For example, “When discussing this topic, it’s important to mention the impact of climate change.”
  • In a presentation about a new product, someone might say, “Before we move on, it’s important to mention the extensive testing that has been done.”
  • A writer might include a footnote that says, “It’s important to mention that these statistics are based on a small sample size.”

24. Just a quick note

This phrase is used to quickly communicate a piece of information without going into detail.

  • For instance, “Just a quick note, the office will be closed tomorrow for a staff event.”
  • In an email, someone might write, “Just a quick note to let you know that I received your message.”
  • A teacher might leave a sticky note on a student’s desk that says, “Just a quick note, remember to bring your textbook tomorrow.”

25. Be alert

This phrase is used to advise someone to be aware of their surroundings and pay attention to potential dangers or changes.

  • For example, “When walking alone at night, it’s important to be alert.”
  • In a military setting, a commander might say, “Be alert for any signs of enemy activity.”
  • A parent might remind their child, “When crossing the street, always be alert for oncoming traffic.”

26. Just a caution

This phrase is used to give a gentle warning or reminder about something. It implies that the speaker wants to bring attention to a potential issue or problem.

  • For example, “Just a caution, be careful when walking on that slippery floor.”
  • In a conversation about driving, someone might say, “Just a caution, watch out for the construction zone ahead.”
  • When giving advice, a person might say, “Just a caution, make sure to double-check your sources before believing everything you read online.”

27. Just a warning

This phrase is used to give a direct warning or alert about something. It implies that the speaker wants the listener to be aware of a potential danger or negative consequence.

  • For instance, “Just a warning, there’s a high chance of rain tomorrow.”
  • In a discussion about a new restaurant, someone might say, “Just a warning, the service can be slow during peak hours.”
  • When talking about a movie, a person might say, “Just a warning, there are some intense and graphic scenes in this film.”

28. Just a note

This phrase is used to provide a brief comment or additional information about something. It implies that the speaker wants to share a small but important detail.

  • For example, “Just a note, the meeting time has been changed to 3 PM.”
  • In a conversation about a recipe, someone might say, “Just a note, you can substitute almond milk for regular milk in this dish.”
  • When discussing a book, a person might say, “Just a note, the author wrote a sequel to this novel.”

29. Just a friendly reminder

This phrase is used to remind someone about something in a friendly and polite manner. It implies that the speaker wants to help the listener remember or stay on track.

  • For instance, “Just a friendly reminder, don’t forget to submit your assignment by tomorrow.”
  • In a discussion about a party, someone might say, “Just a friendly reminder, the event starts at 8 PM.”
  • When talking about a deadline, a person might say, “Just a friendly reminder, the report is due in two days.”

30. Just a friendly heads-up

This phrase is used to give someone a friendly and informal warning or piece of advice. It implies that the speaker wants to help the listener avoid a potential problem or inconvenience.

  • For example, “Just a friendly heads-up, there’s heavy traffic on the highway right now.”
  • In a conversation about a new restaurant, someone might say, “Just a friendly heads-up, the portions are quite large.”
  • When discussing a sale, a person might say, “Just a friendly heads-up, the promotion ends tomorrow.”

31. Be on the ball

This phrase means to be alert and attentive, ready to respond quickly and effectively. It implies being fully engaged and aware of one’s surroundings or responsibilities.

  • For example, in a sports context, a coach might say, “Stay on the ball and be ready to make a play.”
  • In a work setting, a supervisor might advise, “You need to be on the ball during this important meeting.”
  • A friend might say, “If you want to succeed in this competition, you have to be on the ball and give it your all.”

32. Be on your toes

This expression means to be prepared and ready for any situation or challenge that may arise. It suggests being vigilant and proactive, anticipating potential issues or obstacles.

  • For instance, a teacher might tell their students, “Stay on your toes and be ready to answer questions.”
  • In a business context, a manager might say, “We need to be on our toes to stay ahead of the competition.”
  • A parent might advise their child, “When you go out with your friends, be on your toes and make good decisions.”

33. Be on your guard

This phrase means to be cautious and watchful, prepared for potential danger or deception. It implies maintaining a state of heightened awareness and being ready to take action if necessary.

  • For example, a security guard might remind their colleagues, “We need to be on our guard at all times.”
  • In a personal context, someone might say, “When you’re walking alone at night, be on your guard and stay aware of your surroundings.”
  • A detective might caution their partner, “We’re entering a dangerous situation, so be on your guard and stay focused.”

34. Be on high alert

This expression means to be extremely vigilant and ready for an emergency or dangerous situation. It suggests being in a state of heightened readiness and preparedness.

  • For instance, a military commander might order their troops, “We need to be on high alert for any signs of enemy activity.”
  • In a healthcare setting, a nurse might say, “With the current flu outbreak, we’re on high alert for any new cases.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “When you’re at the amusement park, be on high alert and always stay close to us.”

35. Be on red alert

This phrase means to be on the highest level of readiness and preparedness, typically in response to a specific threat or danger. It implies being fully prepared to take immediate action.

  • For example, a police officer might announce, “We’re on red alert due to a credible threat in the area.”
  • In a cybersecurity context, an IT professional might say, “We’re on red alert for any signs of a potential data breach.”
  • A coach might tell their team, “We’re on red alert for the opposing team’s star player, so stay focused and be ready to defend.”

36. Be on full alert

To be on full alert means to be in a state of heightened awareness and readiness. It implies being fully focused and prepared for potential dangers or risks.

  • For example, “The security guards were on full alert after receiving reports of a possible break-in.”
  • A parent might say to their child, “When you’re walking alone at night, be on full alert and aware of your surroundings.”
  • In a military context, a commander might order their troops, “We are entering enemy territory, so be on full alert at all times.”

37. Be on the alert for

To be on the alert for something means to be cautious and watchful for any signs or indications of it. It implies being ready to take action or respond to a specific situation or threat.

  • For instance, “Drivers should be on the alert for pedestrians crossing the road.”
  • A hiker in a bear-infested area might be advised, “Be on the alert for any signs of bear activity.”
  • In a workplace, employees might be reminded, “Be on the alert for any suspicious behavior or unauthorized individuals.”

38. Be on the lookout for

To be on the lookout for something means to actively search or watch for it. It implies being alert and attentive in order to detect or notice something specific.

  • For example, “The police are on the lookout for a suspect matching the description.”
  • A birdwatcher might say, “I’m on the lookout for rare species during my nature walks.”
  • In a treasure hunt game, participants might be told, “Be on the lookout for hidden clues or objects.”