Top 36 Slang For Changing – Meaning & Usage

Changing is an inevitable part of life, and with it comes a whole new set of slang words and phrases. Whether it’s a change in fashion, technology, or even language itself, we’ve got you covered. From chameleon vibes to glow up goals, we’ve compiled a list of the top slang for changing that will keep you in the loop and help you navigate the ever-evolving world around you. So buckle up and get ready to embrace the new and improved language of change!

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1. Changing

This word refers to the act of making or becoming different. It can be used to describe a variety of situations and is often used in the context of personal growth or development.

  • For example, “I’m changing my hairstyle to try something new.”
  • In a discussion about societal norms, someone might say, “Our views on gender are slowly changing.”
  • A person going through a difficult time might express, “I feel like everything is changing around me and I’m struggling to keep up.”

2. Change change

This phrase is redundant and is used to emphasize the act of changing something. It is often used to convey a sense of urgency or importance in making a change.

  • For instance, “We need to change change our approach if we want to see different results.”
  • In a conversation about personal habits, someone might say, “I’ve been trying to change change my eating habits for years.”
  • A person discussing social issues might argue, “We can’t just talk about change, we need to change change our actions.”

3. In the bag

This phrase is used to describe a situation or outcome that is assured or certain. It implies that success or achievement is already secured.

  • For example, “Don’t worry, the victory is in the bag.”
  • In a discussion about a sports match, someone might say, “With a 10-point lead, the game is practically in the bag.”
  • A person expressing confidence in their abilities might declare, “I’ve practiced so much, this exam is in the bag.”

4. Once in a blue moon

This phrase is used to describe something that happens very infrequently or rarely. It suggests that an event or occurrence is uncommon or unusual.

  • For instance, “I only see my favorite band live once in a blue moon.”
  • In a conversation about travel, someone might say, “I get to go on vacation once in a blue moon.”
  • A person discussing their luck might say, “I win the lottery once in a blue moon.”

5. You bet

This phrase is used to express agreement or certainty. It is often used to indicate that one is confident in their statement or response.

  • For example, “Are you coming to the party?” “You bet!”
  • In a conversation about a challenging task, someone might say, “Can you handle it?” “You bet I can!”
  • A person expressing confidence in their abilities might declare, “I’ll finish the project on time, you bet.”

6. I don’t buy that

This phrase is used to express doubt or skepticism about something that has been said or presented. It indicates that the speaker does not accept or agree with the information or idea.

  • For example, if someone tells you a far-fetched story, you might respond, “I don’t buy that for a second.”
  • In a debate or discussion, someone might say, “I don’t buy that argument because it lacks evidence.”
  • If a friend tries to convince you to go to a party, you could respond, “Sorry, but I don’t buy that it’ll be fun.”

7. That’s rad

This phrase is used to express enthusiasm or admiration for something. It indicates that the speaker finds something impressive, exciting, or of high quality.

  • For instance, if someone shows you a new car, you might say, “Wow, that’s rad!”
  • If a friend shares a beautiful photo, you could comment, “That’s rad! Where was it taken?”
  • When watching a thrilling movie, you might exclaim, “That car chase scene was so rad!”

8. Never mind

This phrase is used to dismiss or cancel out something that was previously said or mentioned. It indicates that the speaker no longer wants to discuss or pursue the topic.

  • For example, if someone asks you to borrow a book but then changes their mind, you might say, “Never mind, I’ll keep it.”
  • If you start telling a story but realize it’s not relevant, you could say, “Never mind, it’s not important.”
  • When someone brings up a sensitive topic, you might respond, “Never mind, let’s talk about something else.”

9. Keep in touch

This phrase is used to express the desire to continue communication or stay in contact with someone. It indicates that the speaker wants to maintain a connection or relationship.

  • For instance, if you meet someone at a networking event, you might say, “It was great meeting you. Let’s keep in touch!”
  • If a friend is moving away, you could say, “I’ll miss you. Please keep in touch.”
  • When saying goodbye to a colleague, you might say, “Keep in touch and let me know how things are going.”

10. I can’t even!

This phrase is used to express strong emotions, often a mix of excitement, surprise, or disbelief. It indicates that the speaker is so overwhelmed that they cannot find the words to express themselves.

  • For example, if someone shows you a cute puppy, you might exclaim, “I can’t even! It’s too adorable!”
  • If a friend tells you an unbelievable story, you could respond, “I can’t even believe that happened!”
  • When watching a shocking plot twist in a TV show, you might shout, “I can’t even handle this!”

11. No biggie

This phrase is used to indicate that something is not a problem or not significant. It is a casual way of dismissing a situation or minimizing its importance.

  • For example, if someone apologizes for a mistake, you might respond with, “No biggie, it happens.”
  • If someone asks for a favor and you’re happy to help, you could say, “Sure, no biggie at all.”
  • When someone thanks you for something small, you might reply, “No biggie, glad I could help.”

12. No big deal

Similar to “no biggie,” this phrase is used to indicate that something is not significant or not a problem. It is a casual way of dismissing a situation or minimizing its importance.

  • For instance, if someone spills a drink and apologizes, you might say, “No big deal, accidents happen.”
  • If someone forgets to bring something you asked for, you could respond with, “No big deal, I can manage without it.”
  • When someone thanks you for a small favor, you might reply, “No big deal, happy to help.”

13. No sweat

This phrase is used to indicate that something is not a problem or not difficult to handle. It is a casual way of dismissing a situation or minimizing its importance.

  • For example, if someone asks for a favor and it’s easy for you to do, you might say, “No sweat, I can take care of it.”
  • If someone apologizes for a mistake, you could respond with, “No sweat, it’s not a big deal.”
  • When someone thanks you for something small, you might reply, “No sweat, glad I could help.”

14. Show up

In slang terms, “show up” means to appear or arrive at a place or event. It can also refer to making a strong impression or proving oneself.

  • For instance, if someone invites you to a party, you might say, “I’ll definitely show up, sounds like fun!”
  • If someone challenges your abilities, you could say, “I’ll show up and prove you wrong.”
  • When discussing attendance at a meeting, you might ask, “Who’s planning to show up tomorrow?”

15. Have a crush (on someone)

This phrase is used to describe the feeling of being romantically or sexually attracted to someone. It implies a strong liking or interest in another person.

  • For example, if someone asks if you’re interested in someone, you might say, “Yeah, I have a crush on them.”
  • If someone confesses their feelings for someone else, they might say, “I’ve had a crush on you for a while.”
  • When discussing celebrity crushes, you might ask, “Who’s your current crush?”

16. Get hitched

This slang phrase is used to describe the act of getting married. It is often used informally and can imply a sense of excitement or eagerness.

  • For example, “My best friend is getting hitched next month!”
  • A person might say, “I can’t wait to get hitched and start a family.”
  • Another might ask, “When are you two planning to get hitched?”

17. Tie the knot

Similar to “get hitched,” this phrase is another way of saying “to get married.” It refers to the act of tying a knot, symbolizing the union between two people.

  • For instance, “After dating for five years, they finally decided to tie the knot.”
  • A person might say, “We’re tying the knot next summer in a beach ceremony.”
  • Another might announce, “We’re officially tying the knot this weekend!”

18. I’m beat

This slang phrase is used to express extreme tiredness or fatigue. It is often used after a long day or a strenuous activity.

  • For example, “I’ve been working all day, I’m beat!”
  • A person might say, “I just finished a marathon, I’m completely beat.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I’ve been studying all night, I’m beat!”

19. Get under one’s skin

This slang phrase is used to describe something or someone that bothers or irritates someone else. It refers to the feeling of something getting under the skin and causing discomfort.

  • For instance, “His constant complaining really gets under my skin.”
  • A person might say, “Her loud chewing always gets under my skin.”
  • Another might comment, “The way he interrupts people during conversations really gets under my skin.”

20. A turn off

This slang phrase is used to describe something that is unattractive or unappealing. It can refer to physical appearance, behavior, or any other characteristic that diminishes interest or attraction.

  • For example, “His bad breath is such a turn off.”
  • A person might say, “I don’t like it when people are rude, it’s a major turn off.”
  • Another might comment, “Being late all the time is a real turn off for me.”

21. Doing a 180

This phrase refers to completely changing one’s opinion, stance, or behavior. It implies a complete reversal or opposite direction of what was previously held or done.

  • For example, “He used to hate vegetables, but now he’s doing a 180 and eating salads every day.”
  • In a discussion about political views, someone might say, “I used to be a conservative, but I did a 180 and now I identify as a liberal.”
  • A person might say, “I used to be a workaholic, but after burning out, I did a 180 and now prioritize work-life balance.”

22. Making a U-turn

This phrase is often used to describe a literal change in direction, such as making a U-turn while driving. It can also be used metaphorically to indicate a change in plans or decisions.

  • For instance, “We were going to have dinner at the Italian restaurant, but we made a U-turn and decided on Mexican food instead.”
  • In a conversation about career choices, someone might say, “I was studying medicine, but I made a U-turn and switched to art school.”
  • A person might say, “I was going down a destructive path, but I made a U-turn and started focusing on my health and well-being.”

23. Taking a different route

This phrase signifies opting for a different course of action or approach. It suggests deviating from the usual or expected path and trying something new or unconventional.

  • For example, “Instead of taking the highway, I decided to take a different route and explore the scenic backroads.”
  • In a discussion about problem-solving, someone might suggest, “Let’s take a different route and approach this issue from a fresh perspective.”
  • A person might say, “I was following the traditional career path, but I took a different route and started my own business.”

24. Going through a transformation

This phrase describes a process of experiencing a profound or noticeable change in one’s self, appearance, or circumstances. It implies a complete shift or evolution from one state to another.

  • For instance, “After years of therapy, she went through a transformation and became more confident and self-assured.”
  • In a conversation about personal growth, someone might say, “I went through a transformation after realizing my true passions and pursuing them.”
  • A person might say, “The company went through a transformation when they adopted a more sustainable and environmentally-friendly approach.”

25. Evolving

This word signifies a gradual process of growth, development, or change over time. It implies a continuous adaptation and improvement towards a more advanced or refined state.

  • For example, “Technology is constantly evolving, with new innovations and advancements being introduced regularly.”
  • In a discussion about relationships, someone might say, “Our relationship is evolving as we learn and grow together.”
  • A person might say, “I used to have a fixed mindset, but I’ve been evolving and embracing new perspectives.”

26. Morphing

This term refers to the process of changing or transforming something. It can be used to describe a gradual or significant change.

  • For example, “The company is morphing its business model to adapt to the new market trends.”
  • In a discussion about technology, someone might say, “The software is constantly morphing to meet the users’ needs.”
  • A person describing personal growth might say, “I feel like I’m constantly morphing into a better version of myself.”

27. Altering the game plan

This phrase is used to describe the act of making changes to a plan or strategy, often in response to new information or circumstances.

  • For instance, in a sports context, a coach might say, “We need to alter the game plan to counter the opponent’s strong defense.”
  • In a business setting, someone might say, “We had to alter the game plan after receiving feedback from our customers.”
  • A person discussing personal goals might say, “I had to alter my game plan after realizing I needed to prioritize my health.”

28. Adjusting the sails

This phrase is a metaphor taken from sailing, where adjusting the sails is necessary to navigate changing wind conditions. It means to adapt or make changes in response to new circumstances.

  • For example, someone might say, “In times of uncertainty, it’s important to adjust the sails and remain flexible.”
  • In a discussion about career changes, a person might say, “I had to adjust the sails and explore new opportunities after being laid off.”
  • A person discussing personal growth might say, “I learned the importance of adjusting the sails and embracing change for self-improvement.”

29. Modifying

This term refers to the act of making alterations or adjustments to something in order to improve or adapt it.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m modifying my diet to include more fruits and vegetables.”
  • In a technology context, a person might say, “The developers are modifying the software to fix the bugs.”
  • A person discussing home improvement might say, “I’m modifying the layout of my living room to create more space.”

30. Tweaking

This term refers to making small adjustments or changes to improve the performance, appearance, or functionality of something.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m tweaking the settings on my camera to capture better photos.”
  • In a discussion about website design, a person might say, “The web designer is tweaking the layout to improve user experience.”
  • A person discussing their workout routine might say, “I’m constantly tweaking my exercises to target different muscle groups.”

31. Revamping

Revamping refers to the process of making significant changes to improve or update something. It often involves a complete overhaul or transformation.

  • For example, “We’re revamping our website to make it more user-friendly.”
  • A company might revamp its logo and branding to attract a younger audience.
  • A fashion designer might revamp an old dress by adding new embellishments and altering the silhouette.
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32. Renovating

Renovating involves making repairs, improvements, or updates to a space or object. It often focuses on enhancing functionality, aesthetics, or both.

  • For instance, “We’re renovating our kitchen to create a more open and modern space.”
  • A homeowner might renovate an old house to preserve its historical charm while making it more livable.
  • A business might renovate its office space to create a more collaborative work environment.

33. Upgrading

Upgrading refers to the act of improving or replacing something with a newer or better version. It often involves enhancing performance, functionality, or features.

  • For example, “I’m upgrading my phone to the latest model for better camera quality.”
  • A computer user might upgrade their operating system to access new software and features.
  • A car enthusiast might upgrade their vehicle’s engine for more horsepower and improved performance.

34. Refreshing

Refreshing involves giving something a new or revitalized look or feel. It often focuses on making minor changes or updates to improve the overall appeal.

  • For instance, “I’m refreshing my living room by adding new throw pillows and rearranging the furniture.”
  • A company might refresh its brand by updating its logo and color palette.
  • A website designer might refresh a webpage by changing the layout and adding new graphics.

35. Rebranding

Rebranding refers to the process of changing the image or perception of a brand. It often involves updating the brand’s name, logo, messaging, or overall identity.

  • For example, “The company is rebranding to appeal to a younger demographic.”
  • A restaurant might rebrand itself by changing its menu and decor to attract a different customer base.
  • A company facing negative publicity might rebrand to distance itself from past controversies and rebuild trust with consumers.
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36. Doing a variation

This phrase refers to making changes or alterations to something in order to add variety or diversity. It can be used in a variety of contexts to describe changing or modifying something.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m doing a variation on my usual workout routine to keep things interesting.”
  • In a discussion about cooking, someone might mention, “I like to do a variation on this recipe by adding different spices.”
  • A dancer might say, “I’m doing a variation on this choreography to make it my own.”