Top 44 Slang For Charge – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to slang for getting energized and motivated, there’s a whole new language out there that’s sure to pump you up. From phrases that’ll have you feeling unstoppable to words that scream “get moving,” our team has put together a list of the top slang for charge that will have you ready to tackle anything that comes your way. So, get ready to feel the buzz and embrace the energy with this exciting listicle!

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1. Collar

To be “collared” means to be arrested or taken into custody by law enforcement. The term comes from the action of a police officer physically grabbing or “collaring” a suspect to restrain them.

  • For example, “The police collared the suspect after a high-speed chase.”
  • In a crime novel, a character might say, “I knew I was in trouble when I saw the detective coming to collar me.”
  • A person discussing a recent arrest might say, “The police collared him for shoplifting at the mall.”

2. Pinch

To be “pinched” means to be arrested or taken into custody by law enforcement. The term is often used to describe a sudden or unexpected arrest, as if the police “pinched” the suspect by surprise.

  • For instance, “The police pinched the drug dealer during a sting operation.”
  • In a TV show about crime, a character might say, “I got pinched for a crime I didn’t commit.”
  • A person discussing their past might say, “I was pinched for shoplifting when I was a teenager.”

3. Bust

To be “busted” means to be arrested or taken into custody by law enforcement. The term is often used to describe a significant or successful arrest, as if the police “busted” a criminal.

  • For example, “The police busted a drug ring and made several arrests.”
  • In a conversation about crime, someone might say, “He got busted for stealing a car.”
  • A person discussing their experiences might say, “I’ve been busted a few times in my younger days.”

4. Book

To be “booked” means to be arrested or taken into custody by law enforcement. The term comes from the process of recording an arrested person’s information in an official record or “book.”

  • For instance, “The police booked the suspect on charges of assault.”
  • In a crime TV show, a character might say, “I’ve been booked more times than I can count.”
  • A person discussing their encounter with the police might say, “I was booked for a DUI last year.”

5. Cuff

To be “cuffed” means to be arrested or taken into custody by law enforcement. The term refers to the action of a police officer putting handcuffs or “cuffs” on a suspect to restrain them.

  • For example, “The police cuffed the suspect and placed them in the back of the patrol car.”
  • In a crime documentary, an interviewee might say, “I was cuffed and taken to the police station for questioning.”
  • A person discussing a recent arrest might say, “They cuffed me without even telling me what I did.”

6. Nail

To be arrested or taken into custody by law enforcement.

  • For example, “The police nailed the suspect in a sting operation.”
  • A news headline might read, “Gang leader finally nailed by police after months of investigation.”
  • In a conversation about crime, someone might say, “I heard they nailed the guy who robbed the bank last week.”

7. Run in

To be stopped or detained by law enforcement for questioning or investigation.

  • For instance, “The police ran in the suspicious-looking individual for questioning.”
  • In a crime movie, a character might say, “I’ve been running in with the law since I was a teenager.”
  • A person discussing their past might mention, “I’ve been run in a few times, but I’ve learned my lesson.”

8. Slap with

To officially accuse someone of a crime or wrongdoing.

  • For example, “The prosecutor slapped the defendant with multiple charges.”
  • In a legal drama, a character might say, “They’re trying to slap me with a murder charge, but I’m innocent.”
  • A news report might state, “The police have slapped the suspect with charges of theft and assault.”

9. Haul in

To bring someone to a police station or other official location for questioning or arrest.

  • For instance, “The police hauled in the suspect for further investigation.”
  • In a crime documentary, someone might say, “The detectives hauled in several potential witnesses for questioning.”
  • A news article might report, “The authorities hauled in a group of individuals believed to be involved in the drug trafficking ring.”

10. Pull in

To capture or arrest someone, often with the assistance of law enforcement.

  • For example, “The police pulled in the suspect during a routine traffic stop.”
  • In a crime novel, a character might say, “The detective finally pulled in the elusive criminal.”
  • A news headline might read, “Fugitive finally pulled in after months on the run.”

11. Take in

When someone is “taken in,” it means they have been arrested or detained by law enforcement. This term is often used to describe the initial act of apprehending a suspect.

  • For example, a police officer might say, “We took in three suspects last night in connection with the robbery.”
  • A news headline might read, “Local authorities take in suspect wanted for multiple crimes.”
  • In a crime TV show, a detective might say, “Let’s take him in for questioning and see what he knows.”

12. Pick up

In the context of slang for charge, “pick up” refers to the act of arresting or detaining someone. It can also be used to describe the police taking someone into custody.

  • For instance, a police officer might say, “We picked up the suspect at his residence last night.”
  • A news report might state, “The police have picked up several individuals suspected of drug trafficking.”
  • In a crime novel, a character might say, “The detective was determined to pick up the killer before he struck again.”

13. Bring in

To “bring in” someone means to apprehend or arrest them. This slang term is often used to describe the action of law enforcement officers taking a suspect into custody.

  • For example, a police officer might say, “We brought in the suspect for questioning.”
  • A news article might report, “The police have brought in several individuals for questioning in connection with the crime.”
  • In a crime movie, a detective might say, “Let’s bring him in and see if he cracks under pressure.”

14. Detain

When someone is “detained,” it means they have been temporarily held or arrested by law enforcement. This term is often used to describe the initial act of taking someone into custody for questioning or further investigation.

  • For instance, a police officer might say, “We detained the suspect for further investigation.”
  • A news report might state, “The authorities have detained several individuals for questioning in relation to the incident.”
  • In a crime TV show, a detective might say, “We need to detain him until we gather more evidence.”

15. Apprehend

To “apprehend” someone means to catch or arrest them, typically by law enforcement. This term is often used to describe the action of capturing a suspect or bringing them into custody.

  • For example, a police officer might say, “We apprehended the suspect after a brief chase.”
  • A news headline might read, “Fugitive finally apprehended after months on the run.”
  • In a crime novel, a detective might say, “Our main objective is to apprehend the criminal and bring them to justice.”

16. Accuse

To claim or assert that someone is guilty of a wrongdoing or crime without providing concrete evidence or proof. “Point the finger” is a slang term used to accuse someone.

  • For instance, in a heated argument, one person might say, “Don’t point the finger at me without any evidence!”
  • In a courtroom drama, a lawyer might accuse a witness by saying, “You’re just trying to point the finger at my client to save yourself.”
  • A friend might playfully accuse another by saying, “You’re the one who ate all the cookies, don’t try to point the finger at me!”

17. Indict

To formally charge someone with a crime or offense. “Bring formal charges” is a slang term used to indicate that someone is being indicted.

  • For example, a news headline might read, “The grand jury decided to indict the suspect in the murder case.”
  • In a legal discussion, a lawyer might explain, “Once the prosecutor presents enough evidence, the grand jury can choose to indict the accused.”
  • A person might say, “If the police have enough evidence, they can indict the suspect and start the trial.”

18. Prosecute

To initiate legal proceedings against someone and present a case in court. “Take to court” is a slang term used to refer to the act of prosecuting someone.

  • For instance, a district attorney might say, “We will prosecute anyone who commits a crime in our jurisdiction.”
  • In a discussion about criminal justice, a person might argue, “The goal should be to rehabilitate, not just prosecute.”
  • A friend might jokingly say, “If you keep stealing my snacks, I’m going to prosecute you for snack theft!”

19. Sue

To initiate a legal action against someone in order to seek compensation or resolution for a perceived wrong or harm. “Take to court” is a slang term used to refer to suing someone.

  • For example, a person might say, “If the company doesn’t address my concerns, I’m going to sue them.”
  • In a conversation about personal injury, someone might advise, “If you’re injured due to someone else’s negligence, you have the right to sue for damages.”
  • A friend might jokingly say, “If you don’t return my borrowed clothes, I’m going to sue you for fashion theft!”

20. File charges

To officially submit a formal accusation or complaint against someone, typically to law enforcement or a legal authority. “Press charges” is a slang term used to indicate the act of filing charges.

  • For instance, a victim of assault might say, “I’m going to file charges against my attacker.”
  • In a discussion about domestic violence, a counselor might explain, “It’s important for victims to feel empowered to press charges if they choose.”
  • A person might warn, “If you continue to harass me, I will have no choice but to file charges against you.”

21. Lay charges

This phrase refers to the act of formally accusing someone of a crime. It is often used in legal contexts when law enforcement or prosecutors decide to charge someone with an offense.

  • For example, “The police decided to lay charges against the suspect for theft.”
  • In a news article about a high-profile case, it might say, “The district attorney has laid charges against the alleged murderer.”
  • A lawyer might advise their client, “If the evidence is strong, the prosecution will likely lay charges.”

22. Press charges

Similar to “lay charges,” this phrase means to formally accuse someone of a crime. It is commonly used when a victim or witness decides to take legal action against an offender.

  • For instance, “The victim decided to press charges against their assailant.”
  • In a conversation about domestic violence, someone might say, “If you’re a victim, it’s important to know your rights and consider pressing charges.”
  • A police officer might ask a victim, “Would you like to press charges against the person who stole your wallet?”

23. Take down

This phrase is often used to describe the act of apprehending or arresting a suspect. It can also refer to stopping someone from committing a crime or taking action against them.

  • For example, “The police were able to take down the suspect after a high-speed chase.”
  • In a discussion about law enforcement, someone might say, “Officers are trained to take down individuals who pose a threat to public safety.”
  • A news headline might read, “Gang leader taken down in major drug bust.”

24. Pull over

This phrase is used to describe the action of a driver bringing their vehicle to a stop at the side of the road, usually in response to a request or order from law enforcement.

  • For instance, “The police officer signaled for the driver to pull over for speeding.”
  • In a conversation about traffic safety, someone might say, “If a police car is behind you with their lights on, you should pull over as soon as it’s safe.”
  • A driver might recount their experience, “I got pulled over for a broken taillight, but the officer let me off with a warning.”

25. Ticket

This term is commonly used to refer to a document issued by law enforcement, usually to a driver, as a result of a traffic violation or other offense. It typically includes information about the violation and any associated fines or penalties.

  • For example, “The police officer handed the driver a ticket for running a red light.”
  • In a discussion about traffic enforcement, someone might say, “Getting a ticket can be a costly and inconvenient experience.”
  • A person might complain, “I can’t believe I got a parking ticket for being just a few minutes late.”

26. Fine

A payment that is imposed as a punishment for breaking a rule or law. “Fine” can also refer to the amount of money that needs to be paid as a penalty.

  • For example, if you park illegally, you might receive a ticket with a fine.
  • In a discussion about speeding, someone might say, “I got pulled over and had to pay a hefty fine.”
  • A person might complain, “I can’t believe they charged me such a high fine for a minor offense.”

27. Levy

The act of imposing or charging a fee, tax, or duty. “Levy” can also refer to the amount of money that is charged or collected.

  • For instance, a government might levy a tax on certain goods or services.
  • In a conversation about income, someone might say, “The government levies a percentage of your earnings as income tax.”
  • A person might argue, “The new levy on sugary drinks is a way to discourage unhealthy consumption.”

28. Invoice

A document that itemizes the goods or services provided, along with the amount of money owed for them. “Invoice” can also refer to the act of sending or receiving such a document.

  • For example, a business might send an invoice to a client for services rendered.
  • In a discussion about payment, someone might say, “I haven’t received the invoice for the work done.”
  • A person might ask, “Could you please send me an invoice for the products I purchased?”

29. Bill

A written or printed document that shows the amount of money owed for goods or services. “Bill” can also refer to the act of charging someone for those goods or services.

  • For instance, a restaurant might give you the bill at the end of your meal.
  • In a conversation about utilities, someone might say, “I received a high electricity bill this month.”
  • A person might complain, “The company keeps sending me incorrect bills and it’s frustrating.”

30. Price

The amount of money that needs to be paid in order to purchase or obtain something. “Price” can also refer to the value or worth of something.

  • For example, a store might display the price of an item on a price tag.
  • In a discussion about budgeting, someone might say, “I can’t afford to buy that; it’s way beyond my price range.”
  • A person might comment, “The price of housing in this area has skyrocketed in recent years.”

31. Fee

A fee is a payment that is charged for a particular service or privilege. It is often a fixed amount that is paid in exchange for a specific service or access to something.

  • For example, “There is a small fee to enter the museum.”
  • A user might ask, “What are the fees for using this online platform?”
  • A business might advertise, “No hidden fees, just straightforward pricing.”

32. Tariff

A tariff is a tax or duty that is imposed on goods that are imported or exported between countries. It is often used as a means of regulating trade or protecting domestic industries.

  • For instance, “The government increased the tariff on imported cars.”
  • A news article might discuss, “The impact of tariffs on the economy.”
  • A person might ask, “How do tariffs affect consumer prices?”

33. Toll

A toll is a charge or fee that is paid for the use of a particular road, bridge, or other infrastructure. It is often used to fund the maintenance or construction of the infrastructure.

  • For example, “You need to pay a toll to cross this bridge.”
  • A driver might complain, “The tolls on this highway are too expensive.”
  • A person might ask, “Are there any toll-free routes to get to the city?”

34. Fare

A fare is a charge or fee that is paid for transportation, especially by public transportation such as buses, trains, or taxis. It is the amount of money that a passenger pays to travel from one place to another.

  • For instance, “The bus fare is $2.50.”
  • A commuter might say, “I need to buy a monthly fare pass.”
  • A person might ask, “What’s the fare to get to the airport?”

35. Cost

Cost refers to the price or amount of money that is required to purchase or obtain something. It represents the financial expense or investment needed to acquire a product or service.

  • For example, “The cost of the new iPhone is $999.”
  • A shopper might ask, “What’s the cost of this item?”
  • A business might advertise, “High quality at an affordable cost.”

36. Rate

This term refers to the price or fee that is charged for a particular service or product. It can also indicate the speed or pace at which something occurs.

  • For example, a customer might ask, “What’s the rate for a one-hour massage?”
  • In a conversation about internet speed, someone might say, “I’m paying for a high rate of data transfer.”
  • A person discussing the cost of living might comment, “The inflation rate is increasing, making everything more expensive.”

37. Dues

Dues are a regular payment required for membership in an organization or club. It can also refer to the money owed for a debt or obligation.

  • For instance, a member of a gym might say, “I need to pay my monthly dues.”
  • In a discussion about a professional association, someone might mention, “The annual dues for membership are quite reasonable.”
  • A person talking about financial responsibilities might state, “I have outstanding dues on my credit card bill.”

38. Assessment

This term refers to the process of evaluating or judging something. In the context of charges, it can indicate the determination of the amount or value of something.

  • For example, a real estate agent might say, “The property assessment came in higher than expected.”
  • In a conversation about taxes, someone might mention, “The tax assessment determines how much you owe.”
  • A person discussing performance reviews might comment, “My annual assessment at work went really well.”

39. Duty

Duty refers to a moral or legal obligation to do something. In the context of charges, it can indicate a responsibility or task that needs to be fulfilled.

  • For instance, a soldier might say, “It’s my duty to protect my country.”
  • In a discussion about parenting, someone might mention, “Taking care of my children is my primary duty.”
  • A person talking about work might state, “I have a duty to complete this project by the deadline.”

40. Tollbooth

A tollbooth is a small building or booth where tolls or fees are collected for the use of certain roads or bridges. It can also refer to the physical structure where tolls are paid.

  • For example, a traveler might say, “I had to stop at the tollbooth to pay the fee.”
  • In a conversation about road trips, someone might mention, “There was a long line at the tollbooth, causing a delay.”
  • A person discussing infrastructure might comment, “The new tollbooth plaza has improved traffic flow.”

41. Price tag

The term “price tag” is slang for the amount of money that something costs. It is commonly used to refer to the monetary value of an item or service.

  • For example, “I saw a designer handbag with a hefty price tag.”
  • A shopper might say, “I found a great deal on this dress, and it had a low price tag.”
  • Someone discussing budgeting might mention, “I always check the price tag before making a purchase.”

42. Bring up on charges

To “bring up on charges” means to formally accuse someone of a crime or wrongdoing. It is a legal term used to describe the process of initiating a criminal case against an individual.

  • For instance, “The police decided to bring him up on charges of theft.”
  • In a courtroom drama, a lawyer might say, “I am prepared to bring the defendant up on charges of murder.”
  • A news report might state, “The district attorney plans to bring up the suspect on charges related to fraud.”

43. Throw the book at

The phrase “throw the book at” is slang for imposing the maximum possible punishment or penalty on someone. It is often used to describe a situation where someone is punished severely for their actions.

  • For example, “The judge decided to throw the book at the convicted criminal.”
  • A person discussing a strict legal system might say, “In this country, they really throw the book at you if you break the law.”
  • A news headline might read, “Prosecutors plan to throw the book at the corrupt politician.”

44. Tag

In the context of slang for charge, “tag” is used as a verb to mean to label or identify someone as being guilty of a crime or wrongdoing.

  • For instance, “The detective was able to tag the suspect as the prime suspect.”
  • In a discussion about law enforcement, someone might say, “They need solid evidence to tag someone with a crime.”
  • A news report might state, “The police were able to tag the perpetrator through DNA evidence.”
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