Top 44 Slang For Citizen – Meaning & Usage

Citizens of the world, unite! Slang for Citizen is here to decode the language of everyday people. From local lingo to global expressions, we’ve got you covered. Join us as we explore the vibrant tapestry of words that bind us together as members of society. Get ready to level up your street smarts and dive into the fascinating world of citizen slang!

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1. Civvy

This term is used to refer to a person who is not a member of the military or law enforcement. It is often used to distinguish between those who serve in uniform and those who do not.

  • For example, a soldier might say, “Once I’m done with my military service, I’ll be a civvy again.”
  • In a conversation about job opportunities, someone might ask, “What options are available for civvies in the tech industry?”
  • A police officer might say, “I appreciate the support we receive from the civvy population.”

2. Joe Public

This term is used to refer to an ordinary or average citizen. It is often used to describe someone who is not famous, influential, or well-known.

  • For instance, a news article might say, “The new tax policy will have a significant impact on Joe Public.”
  • In a discussion about public opinion, someone might argue, “We need to consider the perspective of Joe Public when making decisions.”
  • A politician might say, “I’m fighting for the rights and interests of Joe Public.”

3. John Q. Public

Similar to Joe Public, this term is used to refer to an average citizen. It is often used in a more formal or legal context.

  • For example, a lawyer might say, “The new legislation will have a direct impact on John Q. Public.”
  • In a courtroom, a witness might be asked, “How would this decision affect John Q. Public?”
  • A journalist might write, “The new policy is a concern for John Q. Public, who will bear the financial burden.”

4. Regular Joe

This term is used to refer to an ordinary or average person, typically a man. It is often used to emphasize the relatability or commonness of an individual.

  • For instance, a friend might say, “I’m just a regular Joe, trying to make a living.”
  • In a conversation about dating, someone might say, “I’m looking for a regular Joe, someone down-to-earth.”
  • A comedian might joke, “Here’s a tip for all the regular Joes out there…”

5. Jane Doe

Similar to John Q. Public, this term is used to refer to an average or unidentified woman. It is often used in legal or medical contexts when referring to a hypothetical or unknown female individual.

  • For example, in a court case, a lawyer might refer to a female witness as “Jane Doe.”
  • In a medical report, a doctor might use “Jane Doe” to protect the privacy of a patient.
  • A news article might use “Jane Doe” to represent the voice of an average woman in a specific situation.

6. Commoner

This term refers to an ordinary individual who does not hold any special status or position. It is often used to contrast with someone who is wealthy or holds a higher social status.

  • For example, a news article might mention, “The commoners were protesting against the government’s decision.”
  • In a conversation about the monarchy, one might say, “The royal family’s lifestyle is so different from that of commoners.”
  • A person discussing social classes might argue, “We need to bridge the gap between the elite and commoners.”

7. Peasant

Originally used to describe a person of low social status who worked as a farmer or laborer, “peasant” now carries a derogatory connotation when used to refer to someone as uneducated or uncultured.

  • For instance, in a heated argument, one person might insult the other by saying, “You’re just a peasant with no understanding of the world.”
  • In a historical context, a book might mention, “The peasants lived in poverty and worked the land for the nobility.”
  • A person discussing social inequality might say, “The wealth gap between the elite and the peasants is widening.”

8. Joe Schmoe

This term is used to refer to an ordinary, unremarkable individual. It is often used when talking about someone whose name is not known or is not important.

  • For example, in a story, a character might say, “I bumped into Joe Schmoe on the street today.”
  • In a conversation about work, one might mention, “I’m just another Joe Schmoe trying to make a living.”
  • A person discussing anonymity might argue, “In a big city, you can easily become just another Joe Schmoe.”

9. Regular Jane

Similar to “Joe Schmoe,” this term is used to refer to an ordinary woman. It is often used when talking about someone whose name is not known or is not important.

  • For instance, in a conversation about dating, one person might say, “I’m tired of dating regular Janes. I want someone unique.”
  • In a story, a character might mention, “I saw Regular Jane at the grocery store.”
  • A person discussing stereotypes might argue, “Society often expects Regular Janes to conform to certain standards.”

10. Mr. Smith

This term is used to refer to an ordinary man, often representing the average person. It is a generic name that could be used in place of any common surname.

  • For example, in a hypothetical scenario, a teacher might say, “Mr. Smith, please solve this math problem.”
  • In a conversation about identity, one might say, “Mr. Smith represents the struggles of the working class.”
  • A person discussing privacy might argue, “We need to protect the privacy of Mr. Smith and his personal information.”

11. Mrs. Jones

This term is used to refer to an ordinary, average citizen. It is often used to emphasize the normalcy or unremarkable nature of someone.

  • For example, in a conversation about a neighborhood, someone might say, “Mrs. Jones is just your typical everyday Joe.”
  • In a discussion about the working class, a person might comment, “Mrs. Jones represents the struggles and aspirations of the common folk.”
  • A character in a story might say, “Mrs. Jones is the epitome of a regular citizen, going about her daily life.”

12. Everyday Joe

Similar to “Mrs. Jones,” this term is used to describe a regular, average citizen. It is often used to highlight the relatability or normality of someone.

  • For instance, in a conversation about politics, someone might say, “We need policies that benefit the everyday Joe.”
  • In a discussion about social issues, a person might argue, “The concerns of the everyday Joe should be at the forefront of policymaking.”
  • A character in a book might say, “I’m just an everyday Joe trying to make a living and provide for my family.”

13. Average Joe

This term refers to an ordinary, average citizen. It is often used to emphasize the normalcy or unremarkable nature of someone.

  • For example, in a conversation about sports, someone might say, “Even the average Joe can appreciate the skill of professional athletes.”
  • In a discussion about income inequality, a person might comment, “The policies in place are not benefiting the average Joe.”
  • A character in a movie might say, “I’m just your average Joe, trying to find my place in the world.”

14. Regular Citizen

Similar to “Average Joe” and “Everyday Joe,” this term is used to describe a regular, average citizen. It is often used to highlight the normality or commonness of someone.

  • For instance, in a conversation about voting, someone might say, “It’s important for regular citizens to exercise their right to vote.”
  • In a discussion about government policies, a person might argue, “Regular citizens should have a say in decisions that affect their lives.”
  • A character in a TV show might say, “I’m just a regular citizen, trying to navigate the complexities of everyday life.”

15. Common Folk

This term refers to the general population or ordinary citizens. It is often used to emphasize the shared experiences or commonality among people.

  • For example, in a conversation about cultural traditions, someone might say, “These traditions have been passed down through generations of common folk.”
  • In a discussion about social movements, a person might comment, “The power lies in the collective action of the common folk.”
  • A character in a play might say, “This story is about the struggles and triumphs of the common folk.”

16. Regular folk

“Regular folk” is a term used to refer to ordinary individuals or common people. It is often used to contrast with a specific group or category of people, such as celebrities or elites.

  • For example, a politician might say, “I’m here to fight for the rights of regular folk.”
  • In a conversation about income inequality, someone might argue, “Regular folk are struggling to make ends meet while the rich get richer.”
  • A person discussing social issues might say, “We need policies that address the concerns of regular folk.”

17. Regular bloke

A “regular bloke” is a slang term commonly used in British English to refer to an ordinary man or guy. It implies a down-to-earth and relatable personality.

  • For instance, a friend might introduce someone by saying, “This is Dave, just a regular bloke.”
  • In a discussion about sports, someone might say, “He may not be the most talented player, but he’s a regular bloke who gives it his all.”
  • A British character in a movie might say, “I’m just a regular bloke trying to get by.”

18. Regular gal

A “regular gal” is a colloquial term used to refer to an ordinary woman or girl. It emphasizes the idea of being relatable and typical.

  • For example, a friend might say, “She’s not a celebrity, just a regular gal.”
  • In a conversation about fashion, someone might comment, “These clothes are for regular gals, not supermodels.”
  • A female character in a TV show might say, “I’m just a regular gal trying to navigate life.”

19. Regular guy

A “regular guy” is a phrase used to describe an average man or guy. It conveys the idea of being ordinary, relatable, and unpretentious.

  • For instance, a colleague might say, “He’s not a CEO, just a regular guy.”
  • In a discussion about hobbies, someone might say, “He’s a regular guy who enjoys fishing and watching sports.”
  • A character in a sitcom might say, “I’m just a regular guy dealing with everyday problems.”

20. Regular Jill

“Regular Jill” is a term used to refer to an ordinary woman or girl. It is similar to the phrase “regular guy” and emphasizes the idea of being typical and relatable.

  • For example, a friend might introduce someone by saying, “This is Jane, just a regular Jill.”
  • In a conversation about career aspirations, someone might say, “I’m just a regular Jill trying to make a difference.”
  • A character in a book might say, “I’m not a superhero, just a regular Jill with her own strengths and weaknesses.”

21. Everyday Jane

This term is used to refer to an ordinary woman or a typical female citizen. It emphasizes the idea of an average person in society.

  • For example, “Everyday Jane just wants to live a simple life.”
  • In a discussion about gender equality, someone might say, “We need to listen to the voices of everyday Janes.”
  • A person might describe a relatable female character in a book as, “She’s like an everyday Jane, facing everyday challenges.”

22. Everyday Jill

Similar to “Everyday Jane,” this term is used to describe an ordinary woman or a typical female citizen. It highlights the idea of a regular person in society.

  • For instance, “Everyday Jill goes about her daily routine.”
  • In a conversation about representation, someone might argue, “We need more stories that reflect the experiences of everyday Jills.”
  • A person might say, “She’s not a superhero, just an everyday Jill trying to make a difference.”

23. Everyday bloke

This phrase is used to refer to an ordinary man or a typical male citizen. It emphasizes the idea of an average person in society, particularly in British slang.

  • For example, “Everyday blokes enjoy a pint at the local pub.”
  • In a discussion about stereotypes, someone might say, “Not all everyday blokes fit the ‘macho’ image.”
  • A person might describe a relatable male character in a TV show as, “He’s just an everyday bloke dealing with everyday problems.”

24. Everyday gal

Similar to “Everyday Jane” and “Everyday Jill,” this term is used to describe an ordinary woman or a typical female citizen. It highlights the idea of a regular person in society.

  • For instance, “Everyday gals face the same challenges as everyone else.”
  • In a conversation about inclusivity, someone might argue, “We need to give everyday gals a platform to share their stories.”
  • A person might say, “She’s not a celebrity, just an everyday gal trying to make a living.”

25. Everyday guy

This phrase is used to refer to an ordinary man or a typical male citizen. It emphasizes the idea of an average person in society.

  • For example, “Everyday guys work hard to support their families.”
  • In a discussion about societal expectations, someone might say, “We should celebrate the achievements of everyday guys.”
  • A person might describe a relatable male character in a movie as, “He’s just an everyday guy trying to find his place in the world.”

26. Common citizen

This term refers to an ordinary individual who is not part of any specific group or profession. It is often used to describe someone who is not wealthy or influential.

  • For example, in a discussion about social issues, one might say, “We need to address the concerns of the common citizen.”
  • In a political debate, someone might argue, “The policies should benefit the common citizen, not just the elites.”
  • A news article might highlight, “The struggles faced by common citizens in accessing affordable healthcare.”

27. Common civilian

This term is used to describe a regular person who is not in the military or law enforcement. It emphasizes the distinction between ordinary individuals and those with specific roles or responsibilities.

  • For instance, in a discussion about emergency preparedness, one might say, “It’s important for common civilians to know basic first aid.”
  • In a news report, a journalist might state, “The incident was witnessed by common civilians who quickly called for help.”
  • A police officer might explain, “Our job is to protect and serve the common civilians in our community.”

28. Common Joe

This term is a colloquial way to refer to an ordinary individual, often used in a casual or friendly manner. It is similar in meaning to “common citizen” and highlights the regularity or typicality of the person.

  • For example, in a conversation about work, someone might say, “I’m just a common Joe trying to make a living.”
  • In a sports discussion, a fan might comment, “Common Joes like us love cheering for the underdog.”
  • A comedian might joke, “I’m here to entertain you common Joes and Janes tonight!”

29. Common Jane

This term is a variation of “common Joe” specifically referring to an ordinary woman. It is used in a similar way to highlight the regularity or typicality of the person.

  • For instance, in a discussion about gender equality, one might say, “We need to address the challenges faced by common Janes in the workplace.”
  • In a conversation about dating, someone might comment, “Finding love can be tough for common Janes like us.”
  • A writer might include a relatable character, saying, “Jane is a common Jane who faces everyday struggles.”

30. Common Jill

Similar to “common Jane,” this term specifically refers to an ordinary woman. It is used in a similar way to highlight the regularity or typicality of the person.

  • For example, in a discussion about women’s rights, one might say, “We must fight for the rights of common Jills everywhere.”
  • In a conversation about hobbies, someone might share, “I enjoy the same activities as common Jills who love the outdoors.”
  • A motivational speaker might address the audience, saying, “You can achieve great things, just like any common Jill.”

31. Common bloke

This term refers to an average or regular individual, typically used in British slang. It is often used to describe someone who is unremarkable or lacks any special qualities.

  • For example, “He’s just a common bloke, nothing special about him.”
  • In a conversation about everyday people, someone might say, “Most of us are just common blokes trying to make a living.”
  • A British person might use the term to refer to a friend, saying, “I’m meeting up with a couple of common blokes later.”

32. Common gal

Similar to “common bloke,” this term refers to an ordinary woman. It is used to describe a regular individual who does not stand out or possess any exceptional qualities.

  • For instance, “She’s just a common gal, nothing particularly interesting about her.”
  • In a discussion about different types of people, someone might say, “Most of us are just common gals trying to get by.”
  • A person might use the term affectionately to refer to a female friend, saying, “She’s a great common gal to have around.”

33. Common guy

This term is similar to “common bloke” and “common gal” but refers specifically to an ordinary man. It is used to describe a regular individual who is not particularly noteworthy or exceptional.

  • For example, “He’s just a common guy, nothing special about him.”
  • In a conversation about everyday people, someone might say, “Most of us are just common guys trying to make a living.”
  • A person might refer to a male friend as a common guy, saying, “He’s a good common guy to have around.”

34. Average bloke

This term is similar to “common bloke” but emphasizes the idea of being average or typical. It is used to describe an ordinary individual who does not stand out or possess any exceptional qualities.

  • For instance, “He’s just an average bloke, nothing remarkable about him.”
  • In a discussion about different types of people, someone might say, “Most of us are just average blokes trying to get by.”
  • A person might use the term affectionately to refer to a male friend, saying, “He’s an alright average bloke.”

35. Average gal

Similar to “average bloke,” this term refers to an ordinary woman. It is used to describe a regular individual who is not particularly noteworthy or exceptional.

  • For example, “She’s just an average gal, nothing special about her.”
  • In a conversation about everyday people, someone might say, “Most of us are just average gals trying to make a living.”
  • A person might refer to a female friend as an average gal, saying, “She’s a decent average gal to hang out with.”

36. Average guy

This term refers to an ordinary individual, often used to describe someone who is not particularly remarkable or special. “Average guy” is a colloquial way to refer to a typical citizen.

  • For example, in a conversation about everyday people, someone might say, “The average guy just wants to work hard and provide for his family.”
  • A person discussing societal expectations might comment, “The pressure to be more than just an average guy can be overwhelming.”
  • Another might use the term in a humorous way, saying, “I’m just your average guy with an above-average love for pizza.”

37. Average Jill

Similar to “average guy,” this term refers to an ordinary individual, specifically a woman. “Average Jill” is a gender-specific variation of the term used to describe a typical female citizen.

  • For instance, in a discussion about gender equality, someone might say, “We need to prioritize equal opportunities for both the average guy and the average Jill.”
  • A person advocating for inclusivity might comment, “It’s important to recognize the experiences of the average Jill in addition to the average guy.”
  • Another might use the term to highlight relatability, saying, “The struggles of the average Jill are often overlooked, but they’re just as valid.”

38. Mrs. Smith

This term is a placeholder name used to refer to an average woman, often in a generic or hypothetical context. “Mrs. Smith” is a common pseudonym used to represent an ordinary female citizen.

  • For example, in a conversation about everyday experiences, someone might say, “Mrs. Smith just wants to live a happy and fulfilling life.”
  • A person discussing gender roles might comment, “Society’s expectations of Mrs. Smith have evolved over time.”
  • Another might use the term in a relatable way, saying, “We’ve all had moments where we feel like Mrs. Smith, just trying to navigate through life.”

39. Mr. Jones

Similar to “Mrs. Smith,” this term is a placeholder name used to refer to an average man, often in a generic or hypothetical context. “Mr. Jones” is a common pseudonym used to represent an ordinary male citizen.

  • For instance, in a discussion about societal pressures, someone might say, “Mr. Jones feels the weight of expectations on his shoulders.”
  • A person reflecting on personal experiences might comment, “I’ve had my fair share of Mr. Jones moments, feeling lost and unsure.”
  • Another might use the term to convey relatability, saying, “We’ve all been Mr. Jones at some point, trying to find our place in the world.”

40. Mr. Brown

Similar to “Mr. Jones,” this term is another placeholder name used to refer to an average man, often in a generic or hypothetical context. “Mr. Brown” is a common pseudonym used to represent an ordinary male citizen.

  • For example, in a conversation about societal expectations, someone might say, “Mr. Brown is just trying to do his best in a world that demands so much.”
  • A person discussing the pressures of masculinity might comment, “Mr. Brown often feels the need to suppress his emotions to fit societal norms.”
  • Another might use the term to convey empathy, saying, “We should all strive to be kinder to Mr. Brown and others who are navigating through life’s challenges.”

41. Mrs. Citizen

This term is used to refer to an ordinary woman who is a citizen. It is often used in a casual or lighthearted manner.

  • For example, “Mrs. Citizen just wants to live a peaceful life with her family.”
  • In a discussion about the struggles of everyday people, someone might say, “Mrs. Citizen is the backbone of our society.”
  • A person might use this term to describe themselves, saying, “I’m just a Mrs. Citizen trying to make a difference in my community.”

42. Mr. Public

This term is used to refer to an ordinary man who is a citizen. It is often used in a casual or lighthearted manner.

  • For instance, “Mr. Public is fed up with the state of politics.”
  • In a conversation about the responsibilities of citizens, someone might say, “Mr. Public has a duty to stay informed and vote.”
  • A person might use this term to describe themselves, saying, “I’m just a Mr. Public trying to navigate this crazy world.”

43. Mrs. Public

This term is used to refer to an ordinary woman who is a citizen. It is often used in a casual or lighthearted manner.

  • For example, “Mrs. Public is passionate about advocating for social justice.”
  • In a discussion about community involvement, someone might say, “Mrs. Public is always organizing events to bring people together.”
  • A person might use this term to describe themselves, saying, “I’m just a Mrs. Public trying to make a difference in my neighborhood.”

44. Mr. Average

This term is used to refer to an ordinary man who is a citizen. It is often used in a casual or lighthearted manner.

  • For instance, “Mr. Average is content with a simple life.”
  • In a conversation about the challenges of the working class, someone might say, “Mr. Average is struggling to make ends meet.”
  • A person might use this term to describe themselves, saying, “I’m just a Mr. Average trying to find my place in the world.”
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