Top 85 Slang For Claim – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to making a claim, there’s a whole world of slang out there that can help you express yourself in a more casual and trendy way. Whether you’re looking to sound cool in a conversation or understand what others are saying, we’ve got you covered. Our team has put together a list of the top slang for claim that you need to know. So get ready to level up your vocabulary and claim your rightful place in the slang game!

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1. Demand

To demand something is to insist on having it or to assert one’s right to it. It is often used when someone wants something to be done or provided.

  • For example, “The workers are demanding higher wages.”
  • A customer might say, “I demand to speak to the manager.”
  • In a negotiation, one party might demand certain terms or conditions.

2. Assert

To assert is to state a fact or belief confidently and forcefully. It is often used when someone wants to emphasize their position or make a strong statement.

  • For instance, “He asserted his innocence in the face of the accusations.”
  • In a debate, a participant might assert their argument by saying, “I firmly believe that climate change is a pressing issue.”
  • A leader might assert their authority by declaring, “This decision has been made and will not be changed.”

3. State

To state is to express something in a formal or explicit manner. It is often used when someone wants to communicate information or make a clear statement.

  • For example, “He stated his opinion on the matter.”
  • In a legal context, a witness might state the facts of a case.
  • A teacher might state the rules of the classroom at the beginning of the school year.

4. Maintain

To maintain is to keep something in a particular state or condition. It is often used when someone wants to assert that something is true or to support a claim.

  • For instance, “He maintained his innocence throughout the trial.”
  • In a scientific experiment, researchers might maintain certain conditions to ensure accurate results.
  • A person might maintain that a certain policy is necessary for the well-being of society.

5. Allege

To allege is to claim that someone has done something wrong or illegal without providing proof. It is often used when someone wants to make an accusation or bring attention to a potential wrongdoing.

  • For example, “The newspaper alleged that the politician had accepted bribes.”
  • In a legal context, a plaintiff might allege that the defendant caused harm.
  • A whistleblower might allege misconduct within an organization.

6. Insist

To assert or state something firmly and confidently, often in the face of opposition or doubt.

  • For example, “She insisted that she was innocent of the crime.”
  • In a disagreement, one might say, “I insist that I am right and you are wrong.”
  • A parent might insist to their child, “You need to finish your homework before you can play.”

7. Proclaim

To announce or make known something openly and publicly.

  • For instance, “He proclaimed his love for her in front of everyone.”
  • A leader might proclaim a new law or policy, saying, “Starting today, smoking is banned in all public places.”
  • A victorious team might proclaim their victory by chanting and celebrating.

8. Avow

To openly declare or acknowledge something, often with strong conviction.

  • For example, “He avowed his commitment to fight for justice.”
  • A politician might avow their dedication to serving the people, saying, “I avow to always prioritize the needs of my constituents.”
  • A person might avow their love for someone, saying, “I avow that you are the most important person in my life.”

9. Purport

To claim or profess to be or do something, often without providing evidence or proof.

  • For instance, “The article purports to reveal the secret to eternal youth.”
  • A product might purport to provide miraculous weight loss results, but it’s important to be skeptical.
  • A conspiracy theory might purport that the moon landing was faked.

10. Lay claim to

To assert ownership or a right to something, often in a forceful or authoritative manner.

  • For example, “He laid claim to the vacant property, stating it was rightfully his.”
  • A company might lay claim to a trademark, saying, “We are the sole owners of this brand.”
  • In a dispute over territory, a country might lay claim to a disputed land, asserting their right to it.

11. Stand by

To stand by a claim means to support or defend it, especially in the face of criticism or doubt.

  • For example, “I stand by my statement that I saw a UFO last night.”
  • A person might say, “I stand by my claim that I deserve a promotion because of my hard work.”
  • In a heated argument, someone might assert, “I’ll stand by my claim that you’re wrong until you can prove otherwise.”

12. Uphold

To uphold a claim means to maintain or support it, often in a legal or official context.

  • For instance, “The court upheld her claim of copyright infringement.”
  • A lawyer might argue, “We will fight to uphold our client’s claim of innocence.”
  • In a debate, someone might say, “I will uphold my claim that climate change is a pressing issue.”

13. Validate

To validate a claim means to confirm or substantiate its truth or accuracy.

  • For example, “The evidence presented in court validated her claim of self-defense.”
  • A scientist might say, “Further research is needed to validate these claims.”
  • In a discussion, someone might ask, “Can you provide any evidence to validate your claim?”

14. Profess

To profess a claim means to declare or assert it, often with conviction or certainty.

  • For instance, “He professed his claim that he could solve the problem in record time.”
  • A person might say, “I profess my claim that chocolate is the best dessert.”
  • In a debate, someone might assert, “I profess my claim that the government should provide free healthcare.”

15. Affirm

To affirm a claim means to confirm or assert it, often with confidence or certainty.

  • For example, “The witness affirmed the victim’s claim of harassment.”
  • A person might say, “I affirm my claim that I am the rightful owner of this property.”
  • In a discussion, someone might assert, “I affirm my claim that social media has a negative impact on mental health.”

16. Declare

To officially or formally announce or state something.

  • For example, “The president declared a state of emergency.”
  • A person might declare their love for someone by saying, “I declare my undying love for you.”
  • In a legal setting, a lawyer might declare their client’s innocence.

17. Pronounce

To state or declare something with confidence or certainty.

  • For instance, “He pronounced his support for the new policy.”
  • A person might pronounce their opinion on a controversial topic by saying, “I firmly believe that everyone deserves equal rights.”
  • In a debate, someone might pronounce their argument by saying, “I contend that the government should prioritize education funding.”

18. Pretend

To act or behave as if something is true or real, even when it is not.

  • For example, “She pretended to be sick to get out of work.”
  • A child might pretend to be a superhero by saying, “I am Captain Awesome, here to save the day!”
  • In a game of make-believe, someone might pretend to be a princess or a pirate.

19. Contend

To assert or argue a claim or position.

  • For instance, “She contended that the company’s decision was unfair.”
  • In a political debate, a candidate might contend that their opponent’s policies are detrimental to the economy.
  • A person might contend that their idea is the best solution to a problem by saying, “I contend that my proposal will lead to positive change.”

20. Vouch

To give a guarantee or assurance for the truth or accuracy of something.

  • For example, “I can vouch for her integrity.”
  • A friend might vouch for another friend’s skills by saying, “I can vouch that he is an excellent chef.”
  • In a testimonial, a customer might vouch for the quality of a product by saying, “I can vouch that this vacuum cleaner works wonders.”

21. Corroborate

To provide evidence or support for a claim or statement.

  • For example, “Can you corroborate your alibi with any witnesses?”
  • In a court case, a lawyer might ask a witness, “Can you corroborate the defendant’s version of events?”
  • A journalist might say, “I need multiple sources to corroborate this story before I can publish it.”

22. Substantiate

To prove or verify the truth or validity of a claim or statement.

  • For instance, “Can you substantiate your accusation with any evidence?”
  • A scientist might say, “I conducted experiments to substantiate my hypothesis.”
  • In a debate, one might challenge an opponent, “Please substantiate your claims with facts and data.”

23. Verify

To check or confirm the accuracy or truth of a claim or statement.

  • For example, “Can you verify the authenticity of this document?”
  • A customer might ask a salesperson, “Can you verify if this product is in stock?”
  • A fact-checker might say, “I need to verify the sources before publishing this article.”

24. Authenticate

To confirm or establish the authenticity or validity of a claim or statement.

  • For instance, “Can you authenticate the signature on this document?”
  • A museum curator might authenticate a piece of artwork to determine its origin.
  • A forensic expert might say, “We need to authenticate the evidence before it can be used in court.”

25. Prove

To provide evidence or show beyond doubt the truth or validity of a claim or statement.

  • For example, “Can you prove your theory with experimental results?”
  • In a court trial, a lawyer might say, “We will prove the defendant’s innocence.”
  • A mathematician might say, “I can prove this theorem using mathematical induction.”

26. Justify

To provide evidence or reasoning to support or prove the validity of a claim or argument.

  • For example, “You need to justify your statement with facts.”
  • In a debate, someone might say, “Can you justify why you believe that?”
  • A teacher might ask a student, “Can you justify your answer with examples from the text?”

27. Warrant

To provide a reason or justification for a claim or action.

  • For instance, “His behavior warranted disciplinary action.”
  • In a court case, a lawyer might argue, “The evidence warrants a guilty verdict.”
  • A supervisor might say, “Your performance does not warrant a promotion at this time.”

28. Support

To provide evidence, facts, or arguments to strengthen or validate a claim or position.

  • For example, “She used statistics to support her argument.”
  • In a group discussion, someone might say, “I agree with you and support your point.”
  • A student might ask a teacher, “Can you give me some examples to support this concept?”

29. Testify

To provide a statement or give evidence under oath, usually in a legal setting, to support a claim or provide information.

  • For instance, “The witness will testify in court tomorrow.”
  • In a trial, a lawyer might ask a witness, “Can you testify to what you saw?”
  • A person might say, “I’m willing to testify that I saw him at the scene of the crime.”

30. Witness

To see or experience an event or situation, often used in a legal context to describe someone who has observed a crime or incident and can provide information or evidence.

  • For example, “She witnessed the accident and can provide a detailed account of what happened.”
  • In a court case, a lawyer might ask, “Did you witness the defendant committing the crime?”
  • A person might say, “I was a witness to the argument and can testify about what was said.”

31. Advocate

To advocate means to publicly support or promote a cause or idea. It implies actively speaking out or taking action to support a claim or belief.

  • For example, “She advocates for equal rights for all.”
  • In a discussion about climate change, someone might say, “We need to advocate for sustainable practices.”
  • A political activist might state, “I advocate for affordable healthcare for everyone.”

32. Sustain

To sustain means to maintain or uphold a claim or position over time. It implies continuing to support or defend a claim despite challenges or opposition.

  • For instance, “He sustained his argument with strong evidence.”
  • In a legal context, a lawyer might argue, “We have evidence to sustain our claim of innocence.”
  • A debater might assert, “I will sustain my position with logical reasoning and persuasive arguments.”

33. Ratify

To ratify means to officially approve or confirm a claim, decision, or agreement. It implies giving formal consent or endorsement to a claim or belief.

  • For example, “The committee voted to ratify the proposed policy.”
  • In a business context, a board of directors might ratify a contract by signing it.
  • A government might ratify a treaty by passing it through the legislative process.
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34. Endorse

To endorse means to publicly support or promote a claim, product, or idea. It implies giving one’s approval or recommendation.

  • For instance, “The celebrity endorsed the new clothing line.”
  • In a political campaign, a candidate might seek endorsements from influential figures.
  • A reviewer might say, “I wholeheartedly endorse this book for its compelling storytelling.”

35. Second

To second means to express agreement or support for a claim or proposal. It implies confirming or backing up someone else’s claim.

  • For example, “I second the motion to approve the budget.”
  • In a meeting, someone might say, “I second John’s suggestion to change the meeting time.”
  • A team member might second a colleague’s idea by saying, “I think that’s a great plan. I second it.”

36. Approve

This term is used to indicate that a claim or request has been accepted or authorized. It implies that someone in a position of authority has given their approval.

  • For example, “The manager approved my vacation request.”
  • In a business context, one might say, “The board of directors approved the budget for the new project.”
  • A teacher might tell a student, “I approve of your creativity in this project.”

37. Acknowledge

To acknowledge a claim means to recognize its validity or existence. It can also mean to admit or accept something.

  • For instance, “The company acknowledged the customer’s complaint and offered a refund.”
  • In a legal context, one might say, “The defendant acknowledged his guilt in court.”
  • A person might acknowledge someone’s achievement by saying, “I acknowledge your hard work and dedication.”

38. Recognize

To recognize a claim means to acknowledge its truth or validity. It can also mean to identify or be familiar with something.

  • For example, “The government recognized the importance of addressing climate change.”
  • In a social setting, one might say, “I recognize that face, but I can’t remember where I’ve seen them before.”
  • A teacher might recognize a student’s talent by saying, “I recognize your musical abilities.”

39. Grant

To grant a claim means to give or bestow something, typically as a result of a request or application.

  • For instance, “The court granted the plaintiff’s request for a restraining order.”
  • In a business context, one might say, “The company granted the employee’s request for a promotion.”
  • A teacher might grant a student’s extension request by saying, “I’ll grant you an extra day to submit your assignment.”

40. Concede

To concede a claim means to admit its truth or validity. It can also mean to yield or give in to someone else’s claim or argument.

  • For example, “After a long debate, he conceded that he was wrong.”
  • In a sports context, a player might say, “I’ll concede that you made a great play.”
  • A politician might concede defeat in an election by saying, “I concede the race and congratulate my opponent.”

41. Admit

To acknowledge or accept the truth or existence of something, especially something that may be considered embarrassing, shameful, or negative.

  • For example, “He finally admitted that he had made a mistake.”
  • In a court case, a defendant might admit to committing a crime.
  • A student might admit to cheating on a test when confronted by a teacher.

42. Allow

To give permission or approval for something to happen or be done.

  • For instance, “My parents allowed me to go to the party.”
  • A supervisor might allow an employee to take a day off work.
  • A teacher might allow a student to use their phone for research during a test.

To give permission or approval for something to happen or be done, often after careful consideration or negotiation.

  • For example, “She consented to the terms of the contract.”
  • A patient must give their consent before a medical procedure can be performed.
  • In a sexual context, both parties must give their consent before engaging in any activity.

44. Bag

To obtain or acquire something, often with a sense of accomplishment or success.

  • For instance, “He finally bagged the job he had been interviewing for.”
  • A hunter might bag a deer during a hunting trip.
  • A person might boast, “I always manage to bag the best deals during sales.”

45. Stake

To assert or declare ownership or a right to something.

  • For example, “He staked his claim to the property by putting up a fence.”
  • A person might stake a claim on a parking spot by leaving their car there.
  • In a competitive context, a team might stake their claim to a championship title.

46. Call dibs

This phrase is used to assert the right to something before anyone else. It is often used in informal settings among friends or siblings.

  • For example, “I call dibs on the last slice of pizza!”
  • In a game of basketball, a player might say, “I call dibs on being team captain.”
  • When deciding who gets to sit in the front seat of a car, someone might say, “I call dibs this time.”

47. Lay hold of

This phrase means to acquire or take control of something. It implies a strong assertion of ownership or claim over the item or situation.

  • For instance, “He laid hold of the opportunity and made the most of it.”
  • In a competitive situation, someone might say, “I will lay hold of the trophy and win this competition.”
  • When discussing a valuable item, one might say, “I managed to lay hold of a rare collectible.”

48. Take ownership

This phrase means to accept responsibility or claim ownership over something. It can refer to both physical items and abstract concepts.

  • For example, “It’s time to take ownership of your mistakes and learn from them.”
  • In a team project, someone might say, “Let’s take ownership of this task and ensure its success.”
  • When discussing a project, a leader might say, “I will take ownership and ensure its completion.”

49. Lay down a claim

This phrase means to state or declare one’s right to something. It is often used in legal or formal contexts to assert a legal or official claim.

  • For instance, “The company laid down a claim to the disputed property.”
  • In a legal dispute, a lawyer might say, “We will lay down a claim for damages.”
  • When discussing inheritance, someone might say, “I plan to lay down a claim to my rightful share.”

50. Make a bid for

This phrase means to express or assert a strong desire or claim for something. It can refer to both physical items and abstract opportunities.

  • For example, “He made a bid for the position of team captain.”
  • In a competitive job market, someone might say, “I will make a bid for that coveted position.”
  • When discussing a promotion, an employee might say, “I plan to make a bid for the higher role.”

51. State a case

To state a case means to present an argument or make a claim in support of a particular position or viewpoint.

  • For example, in a court of law, a lawyer might state a case to prove their client’s innocence.
  • In a debate, a participant might state their case to persuade others to agree with their point of view.
  • In a business meeting, a presenter might state a case to convince stakeholders to invest in a new project.
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52. Put forward a claim

To put forward a claim means to propose a statement or assertion, often in a formal or official context.

  • For instance, a researcher might put forward a claim based on their findings in a scientific study.
  • In a negotiation, a party might put forward a claim to assert their position and negotiate favorable terms.
  • In a legal setting, a plaintiff might put forward a claim to seek compensation for damages.

53. Lay claim to fame

To lay claim to fame means to assert ownership or credit for one’s success or achievements.

  • For example, a musician might lay claim to fame for writing a popular song that becomes a hit.
  • A businessperson might lay claim to fame for launching a successful startup that gains widespread recognition.
  • A celebrity might lay claim to fame for their talent or unique contributions to their field.

54. Assert ownership

To assert ownership means to claim possession or control over something.

  • For instance, a homeowner might assert ownership over their property by displaying a sign or fence.
  • In a legal dispute, a person might assert ownership over a piece of artwork or intellectual property.
  • A company might assert ownership over a trademark or brand name to protect their business interests.

55. Make a claim on

To make a claim on means to demand or request ownership or control over something.

  • For example, a person might make a claim on an inheritance or insurance policy to receive their entitled benefits.
  • In a business context, a company might make a claim on a disputed patent to protect their intellectual property rights.
  • A government might make a claim on a piece of land for public use or development.

56. Lay a claim

To lay a claim means to assert ownership or make a formal demand for something. It is often used when someone believes they have a right to something and wants to make it known.

  • For example, “He decided to lay a claim on the abandoned property.”
  • In a legal dispute, one party might say, “I am going to lay a claim to my rightful inheritance.”
  • A person discussing their achievements might say, “I want to lay a claim to being the best in my field.”

57. Make a declaration

To make a declaration means to state something firmly or emphatically. It is often used to express a strong belief or opinion.

  • For instance, “She made a declaration that she would never eat meat again.”
  • During a political speech, a candidate might make a declaration about their plans for the country.
  • A person expressing their love might make a declaration of their feelings to their partner.

58. Take a stand

To take a stand means to adopt a position or stance on a particular issue. It is often used when someone wants to express their opinion or make their beliefs known.

  • For example, “He decided to take a stand against animal cruelty.”
  • In a debate, one might say, “I am going to take a stand in favor of stricter gun control.”
  • A person advocating for a cause might encourage others to take a stand and join the movement.

59. Make a statement

To make a statement means to express an opinion or viewpoint on a particular matter. It is often used to convey a message or make a point.

  • For instance, “She made a statement about the importance of education.”
  • During a press conference, a spokesperson might make a statement on behalf of their organization.
  • A person sharing their thoughts on social media might make a statement about current events.

60. Put in a bid

To put in a bid means to make an offer, usually in a competitive setting such as an auction or bidding process. It is often used when someone wants to express their interest in acquiring something.

  • For example, “He decided to put in a bid for the rare collectible.”
  • In a real estate transaction, a buyer might put in a bid for a property they are interested in.
  • A person participating in an online auction might put in a bid for an item they want to purchase.

61. Declare ownership

This phrase is used to assert one’s ownership or right to something. It implies a strong and confident statement of possession or control.

  • For example, “He declared ownership of the property by putting up a ‘No Trespassing’ sign.”
  • In a legal dispute over property, one party might say, “I declare ownership of this land based on my family’s historical use.”
  • A person might declare ownership of an idea by saying, “I came up with the concept for this product, so I declare ownership of the intellectual property.”

62. Assert a right

To assert a right means to confidently and forcefully state or demand recognition and respect for one’s entitlements or privileges.

  • For instance, “She asserted her right to freedom of speech by speaking out against the government.”
  • In a workplace dispute, an employee might assert their right to fair treatment by saying, “I have the right to a harassment-free work environment.”
  • A person might assert their right to privacy by refusing to answer invasive questions.

63. Make an assertion

To make an assertion means to state or declare a claim or belief, often in a confident and definitive manner.

  • For example, “He made the assertion that climate change is a natural phenomenon.”
  • In a debate, one person might make an assertion by saying, “I assert that raising taxes will stimulate economic growth.”
  • A scientist might make an assertion about their research findings by stating, “Based on our experiments, we can assert that this drug is effective in treating the disease.”

64. Demand recognition

To demand recognition means to insist on acknowledgment or acceptance of one’s claim, often in a forceful or assertive manner.

  • For instance, “The protestors demanded recognition of their right to equal treatment.”
  • In a negotiation, one party might demand recognition of their contributions by saying, “We demand recognition for our role in the project’s success.”
  • A person might demand recognition for their achievements by stating, “I’ve worked hard for this promotion, and I demand recognition for my dedication and skills.”

65. Lay claim to success

To lay claim to success means to assert or declare ownership or responsibility for one’s achievements or accomplishments.

  • For example, “She laid claim to the success of the project by highlighting her contributions.”
  • In a team setting, one member might lay claim to success by saying, “I take credit for the successful implementation of this strategy.”
  • A person might lay claim to success in their personal life by stating, “I worked hard to overcome challenges and achieve my goals, so I lay claim to my success.”

66. Demand restitution

When someone demands restitution, they are asking for compensation or payment for a loss or injury they have suffered. It is a way of claiming what is rightfully owed to them.

  • For example, a victim of a car accident might say, “I am going to demand restitution for the damage to my vehicle and my medical bills.”
  • In a legal dispute, a plaintiff might demand restitution for financial losses caused by the defendant’s actions.
  • A person who was wrongfully terminated from their job might assert, “I will not settle for anything less than full restitution for the harm done to my career and reputation.”

67. Assert a privilege

When someone asserts a privilege, they are claiming a special right or advantage that is not available to everyone. It is a way of asserting their entitlement or exemption from certain rules or obligations.

  • For instance, a lawyer might assert attorney-client privilege to protect confidential information shared by a client.
  • In a political context, a government official might assert executive privilege to withhold certain information from the public.
  • A person might assert a privilege against self-incrimination when refusing to answer a question that could lead to their own prosecution.

68. Make a demand

When someone makes a demand, they are asking for something to be given or provided. It is a way of claiming their right to receive or obtain something.

  • For example, a customer might make a demand for a refund if they are unsatisfied with a product or service.
  • In a negotiation, one party might make a demand for certain terms or conditions to be met before reaching an agreement.
  • A protester might make a demand for social or political change by presenting a list of demands to the government or relevant authorities.
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69. Lay claim to territory

When someone lays claim to territory, they are asserting their ownership or control over a specific area of land. It is a way of claiming the right to use, occupy, or possess a particular piece of territory.

  • For instance, a country might lay claim to disputed territory by asserting historical or legal rights.
  • In a real estate transaction, a buyer might lay claim to a piece of land by filing the necessary paperwork and paying the required fees.
  • A group of settlers might lay claim to uncharted land by establishing a settlement and declaring it their territory.

70. Declare a right

When someone declares a right, they are asserting their legal entitlement to something. It is a way of claiming the recognition and protection of their rights under the law.

  • For example, a citizen might declare their right to freedom of speech when speaking out against government policies.
  • In a legal dispute, a plaintiff might declare their right to fair compensation for damages caused by the defendant’s negligence.
  • A person might declare their right to privacy when refusing to provide personal information to a third party.

71. Make an allegation

This phrase refers to making a statement or claim about someone or something, usually without providing concrete evidence. It implies that the claim is serious and requires investigation or further action.

  • For example, “The witness made an allegation against the suspect, saying they saw them commit the crime.”
  • In a legal context, a lawyer might say, “The defense attorney is expected to make several allegations against the prosecution’s case.”
  • A news article might report, “An anonymous source has made a serious allegation about corruption within the government.”

72. Demand compensation

This phrase means to ask for financial remuneration or reimbursement for a loss, injury, or harm suffered. It implies that the person making the claim believes they are entitled to compensation.

  • For instance, “The victim’s family is demanding compensation for the wrongful death of their loved one.”
  • In a negotiation, one party might state, “We demand compensation for the breach of contract.”
  • A dissatisfied customer might say, “I will demand compensation for the defective product and the inconvenience it has caused me.”

73. Assert a position

This phrase means to confidently declare or state a particular opinion, belief, or stance on a certain issue. It implies that the person making the claim is standing firmly behind their position.

  • For example, “The politician asserted her position on climate change, stating that urgent action is needed.”
  • In a debate, one participant might assert their position by saying, “I firmly believe that access to healthcare is a basic human right.”
  • A person expressing their views might assert, “I assert that education is the key to breaking the cycle of poverty.”

74. Make a requisition

This phrase refers to making a formal request or demand for something, often with a sense of urgency or importance. It implies that the person making the claim needs or wants something specific.

  • For instance, “The department manager made a requisition for additional staff to handle the workload.”
  • In a business setting, one might say, “I need to make a requisition for office supplies.”
  • A government agency might make a requisition for emergency funds to respond to a natural disaster.

75. Demand redress

This phrase means to ask for a resolution or compensation for a perceived wrong or injustice. It implies that the person making the claim seeks a remedy or restitution for the harm they have suffered.

  • For example, “The protesters demanded redress for police brutality and systemic racism.”
  • In a legal context, a victim might demand redress by saying, “I seek redress for the emotional and physical trauma I have endured.”
  • A person advocating for change might demand redress by stating, “We demand redress for the unequal treatment of marginalized communities.”

76. Grab

To grab something means to take hold of it quickly or forcefully. It implies a sudden and decisive action to claim possession or control over something.

  • For example, “I saw the last slice of pizza and grabbed it before anyone else could.”
  • In a game of tag, a player might say, “I’m going to grab you!”
  • A person might exclaim, “I need to grab my keys before we leave!”

77. Snatch

To snatch something means to take or obtain it quickly and stealthily, often with a sense of urgency or desperation. It implies a swift and covert action to claim or acquire something.

  • For instance, “She snatched the toy from her sibling’s hands.”
  • In a crowded market, someone might snatch a purse and disappear into the crowd.
  • A person might say, “I snatched the last ticket just before they sold out!”

78. Commandeer

To commandeer something means to seize it for official use, often without permission or consent. It implies a claim of authority or necessity to take control of something.

  • For example, “During the emergency, the government commandeered all available vehicles for evacuation.”
  • In a military operation, a commander might commandeer a civilian boat for transport.
  • A person might say, “I had to commandeer my friend’s car to get to the airport on time.”

79. Appropriate

To appropriate something means to take it for oneself without permission or legal right. It implies a deliberate and calculated action to claim ownership or control over something.

  • For instance, “He appropriated my idea and presented it as his own.”
  • In a company, an employee might appropriate office supplies for personal use.
  • A person might say, “I had to appropriate some money from my savings to pay for unexpected expenses.”

80. Seize

To seize something means to take hold of it forcibly and suddenly. It implies a strong and decisive action to claim possession or control over something.

  • For example, “The police seized the drugs during the raid.”
  • In a game of tug-of-war, a team might seize the rope and pull with all their strength.
  • A person might say, “I seized the opportunity to study abroad and it changed my life.”

81. Establish rights to

This phrase is often used when someone is trying to legally claim or assert their rights to something. It implies taking the necessary steps to make a claim official or recognized.

  • For example, “He hired a lawyer to help him establish rights to the property.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “We need to establish rights to this trademark before someone else does.”
  • A person discussing inheritance might comment, “It’s important to establish rights to your family’s assets to avoid disputes.”

82. Put in a claim

This phrase is commonly used when someone wants to make a formal claim for something they believe they are entitled to. It implies taking action to assert one’s rights or stake a claim.

  • For instance, “She put in a claim for the damages to her car with the insurance company.”
  • In a legal context, a person might say, “I plan to put in a claim for the lost wages due to the accident.”
  • A customer dissatisfied with a product might comment, “I’m going to put in a claim for a refund.”

83. Make a play for

This phrase is often used to describe someone’s attempt to assert their claim or make a move to gain control or possession of something. It implies taking action or making a strategic move.

  • For example, “He made a play for the promotion by showcasing his leadership skills.”
  • In a sports context, a player might say, “I’m going to make a play for the ball and try to score.”
  • A person discussing a business opportunity might comment, “We need to make a play for that new market before our competitors do.”

84. Assert a right to

This phrase is often used when someone wants to assert their right to something, whether it be a physical possession or an intangible entitlement. It implies confidently stating or declaring one’s claim or entitlement.

  • For instance, “He asserted his right to the inheritance by providing the necessary documentation.”
  • In a legal context, a person might say, “I’m going to assert my right to visitation with my child.”
  • A tenant discussing their rights might comment, “I need to assert my right to a habitable living environment.”

85. Take possession of

This phrase is commonly used when someone wants to claim or take control of something that belongs to them or that they have a right to. It implies physically or legally assuming ownership or control.

  • For example, “He took possession of the keys to his new apartment.”
  • In a business context, a person might say, “We need to take possession of the property before we can start renovations.”
  • A collector discussing a rare item might comment, “I finally took possession of that limited edition artwork I’ve been searching for.”