Top 104 Slang For Clear – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to describing something that is clear or easy to understand, sometimes the usual words just don’t cut it. That’s where slang comes in. Our team at FluentSlang has put together a list of the top slang words and phrases for clear that will not only help you express yourself in a more exciting way, but also keep you up to date with the latest linguistic trends. Get ready to level up your vocabulary and add some flair to your conversations!

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1. Crystal clear

This phrase is used to emphasize that something is very clear and easy to understand.

  • For example, “After reading the instructions, it was crystal clear how to assemble the furniture.”
  • A teacher might say, “I want to make sure the lesson is crystal clear before we move on.”
  • Someone might explain, “The evidence against him was crystal clear, there was no doubt he committed the crime.”

2. Transparent

This term is used to describe something that is clear and easily understood, with no hidden or obscured elements.

  • For instance, “The company’s financial statements are transparent, allowing investors to see exactly where their money is going.”
  • A politician might promise, “I will ensure that our government operates in a transparent manner, with no hidden agendas.”
  • A person might say, “I appreciate your transparent communication, it helps me trust you.”

3. Lucid

This word is used to describe something that is expressed or understood clearly and coherently.

  • For example, “Her presentation was so lucid, everyone in the room understood the concept.”
  • A writer might describe a book as, “The author’s lucid writing style made the story easy to follow.”
  • A person might say, “I had a lucid dream last night, where everything felt incredibly real.”

4. Obvious

This term is used to describe something that is clear and easily understood without the need for further explanation.

  • For instance, “It’s obvious that she is in love with him, the way she looks at him says it all.”
  • A person might say, “The answer to that question is obvious, anyone can see it.”
  • A teacher might explain, “The correct answer should be obvious based on the information provided.”

5. Plain as day

This phrase is used to emphasize that something is very clear and obvious, leaving no room for doubt or confusion.

  • For example, “The evidence against him was plain as day, there was no way he could deny his involvement.”
  • A person might say, “It’s plain as day that she is lying, her body language gives it away.”
  • A detective might say, “The motive for the crime is plain as day, it’s a classic case of revenge.”

6. Clear as a bell

This phrase is used to describe something that is extremely clear or easy to understand. It can also refer to something that is very loud or easily heard.

  • For example, “The instructions were clear as a bell, so I had no trouble following them.”
  • When describing a sound, someone might say, “The church bells rang clear as a bell.”
  • A person might say, “His voice came through the phone loud and clear as a bell.”

7. Explicit

This term is used to describe something that is very clear, specific, or direct. It often refers to something that is stated or expressed in a clear and straightforward manner.

  • For instance, “The contract contains explicit instructions on how to proceed.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “Let me be explicit – I want you to complete the project by Friday.”
  • A person might say, “Her email was explicit about the details of the meeting.”

8. Distinct

This word is used to describe something that is clear, easily recognizable, or different from others. It often refers to something that stands out or is easily distinguished.

  • For example, “The distinct smell of coffee filled the room.”
  • When talking about a person, someone might say, “She has a distinct laugh that I can always recognize.”
  • A person might comment, “The logo needs to be more distinct so it stands out from the competition.”

9. Sharp

This term is used to describe something that is clear, focused, or precise. It often refers to someone’s mental acuity or the clarity of an image or sound.

  • For instance, “She has a sharp mind and can solve complex problems.”
  • When discussing a photograph, someone might say, “The image is sharp, with all the details clearly visible.”
  • A person might comment, “The sound system produces sharp audio, allowing you to hear every nuance.”

10. Unambiguous

This word is used to describe something that is clear, definite, or without any ambiguity. It often refers to a statement or situation that is easily understood or interpreted.

  • For example, “The message was unambiguous – they wanted me to come immediately.”
  • When discussing a rule, someone might say, “The policy is unambiguous – no pets allowed.”
  • A person might comment, “His intentions were unambiguous – he wanted to end the relationship.”

11. Crisp

When something is described as “crisp,” it means that it is clear and easily understood.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Your essay is well-written and crisp.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “Let me explain it to you in a crisp way.”
  • A presenter might say, “I want to deliver a crisp and concise presentation.”

12. Plain

When something is described as “plain,” it means that it is clear and straightforward, without any confusion or complexity.

  • For instance, a person might say, “Let me state it in plain terms.”
  • In a discussion, someone might say, “The facts are plain and undeniable.”
  • A writer might describe their writing style as “plain and simple.”

13. Understandable

When something is described as “understandable,” it means that it is clear and easy to comprehend.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “I hope the lesson was understandable.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “I made my point as clear and understandable as possible.”
  • A presenter might ask, “Is the concept understandable to everyone?”

14. Intelligible

When something is described as “intelligible,” it means that it is clear and comprehensible, easily understood by others.

  • For instance, a person might say, “Please make your instructions more intelligible.”
  • In a discussion, someone might say, “We need to find a way to make our message more intelligible.”
  • A writer might describe their writing style as “intelligible and reader-friendly.”

15. Apparent

When something is described as “apparent,” it means that it is evident and clear, easily noticeable or understood.

  • For example, a person might say, “The answer is apparent if you read the instructions carefully.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “The issue at hand is apparent to everyone.”
  • A presenter might say, “The benefits of this product are apparent in its performance.”

16. Evident

When something is evident, it means that it is clearly visible or apparent. It is used to describe something that is easily understood or recognized.

  • For example, “It is evident that she put a lot of effort into her presentation.”
  • In a discussion about a crime, someone might say, “The evidence is evident that he is guilty.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “The correct answer should be evident from the information given.”

17. Manifest

Manifest is used to describe something that is clearly seen or understood. It refers to something that is evident or obvious.

  • For instance, “Her talent for singing was manifest from a young age.”
  • In a conversation about a problem, someone might say, “The symptoms manifest themselves as a persistent cough.”
  • A person might comment, “The success of the project was manifest in the increased sales.”

18. Transparent as glass

When something is described as transparent as glass, it means that it is completely clear and easy to understand. It refers to something that is not hidden or obscured.

  • For example, “The instructions were transparent as glass, making it easy to assemble.”
  • In a discussion about a company’s financial statements, someone might say, “The numbers should be transparent as glass to ensure transparency.”
  • A person might comment, “Her intentions were transparent as glass; she had no hidden agenda.”

19. See-through

See-through is used to describe something that is clear or transparent, allowing light to pass through. It can also be used metaphorically to describe something that is easy to understand.

  • For instance, “The plastic bag is see-through, so you can easily see what’s inside.”
  • In a conversation about a plan, someone might say, “The logic behind the strategy is see-through.”
  • A person might comment, “Her lies were see-through; it was obvious she was not telling the truth.”

20. Open and shut

Open and shut is used to describe something that is very clear or obvious. It refers to a situation or case that is easily resolved or understood.

  • For example, “The evidence against him was open and shut; there was no doubt of his guilt.”
  • In a discussion about a decision, someone might say, “It’s an open and shut case; the best option is clear.”
  • A person might comment, “The answer to the puzzle was open and shut; it was right in front of us.”

21. Black and white

When something is “black and white,” it means that there is no ambiguity or confusion. It is clear and easily understood.

  • For example, “The rules of the game are black and white. There’s no room for interpretation.”
  • In a debate, someone might say, “The evidence is black and white. There’s no denying the facts.”
  • When discussing a decision, a person might say, “It’s a black and white choice. There are only two options.”

22. Cut and dried

When something is “cut and dried,” it means that it is already determined or settled. There is no need for further discussion or consideration.

  • For instance, “The terms of the contract are cut and dried. There’s nothing left to negotiate.”
  • In a legal case, a lawyer might say, “The evidence is cut and dried. The defendant is clearly guilty.”
  • When discussing a plan, someone might say, “The details are cut and dried. We just need to execute the steps.”

23. Undisputed

When something is “undisputed,” it means that it is widely accepted or recognized without any disagreement or doubt.

  • For example, “He is the undisputed champion of the sport. No one can challenge his title.”
  • In a scientific field, a researcher might say, “The theory is undisputed among experts. It is widely accepted as fact.”
  • When discussing a historical event, someone might say, “The evidence is undisputed. There is no controversy surrounding this fact.”

24. Unmistakable

When something is “unmistakable,” it means that it is easily recognized or identified. There is no confusion or doubt about its nature.

  • For instance, “Her handwriting is unmistakable. I can always tell when she wrote a note.”
  • In a crowd, someone might say, “His unmistakable voice stood out. I could hear him from across the room.”
  • When describing a landmark, a person might say, “The statue is unmistakable. You can’t miss it when you’re in the city.”

25. Patent

When something is “patent,” it means that it is obvious or clear to the point of being easily recognized or understood.

  • For example, “The solution to the problem was patent. It was right in front of us.”
  • In a scientific experiment, a researcher might say, “The results were patent. There was a clear cause-and-effect relationship.”
  • When discussing a flaw, someone might say, “The mistake was patent. It was an obvious oversight.”

26. Crystal

Crystal is a slang term for methamphetamine, a highly addictive and illegal stimulant drug. It is often referred to as crystal due to its appearance, which can resemble clear crystals or shards.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s addicted to crystal and it’s ruining his life.”
  • In a discussion about drug abuse, a person might mention, “Crystal is a dangerous and highly addictive substance.”
  • A news article might report, “Authorities seized a large quantity of crystal during a drug bust.”

27. Glass

Glass is a slang term for a pipe used to smoke methamphetamine. It is called glass due to the material commonly used to make these pipes, which is often clear or transparent.

  • For instance, a person might say, “He was caught with a glass pipe and arrested for drug possession.”
  • In a conversation about drug paraphernalia, someone might ask, “Where can I buy a glass?”
  • A recovery support group might discuss the dangers of glass pipes and their association with drug use.
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28. Ice

Ice is a slang term for methamphetamine, a highly addictive and illegal stimulant drug. It is called ice due to its crystalline appearance, which can resemble ice or glass.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s hooked on ice and it’s destroying his life.”
  • In a discussion about drug addiction, a person might mention, “Ice is one of the most dangerous and addictive drugs.”
  • A news headline might read, “Police seize large quantities of ice in major drug bust.”

29. Rock

Rock is a slang term for crack cocaine, a highly addictive and illegal stimulant drug. It is called rock due to its solid form, which can resemble small rocks or pebbles.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He’s selling rocks on the street corner.”
  • In a conversation about drug abuse, a person might mention, “Rock is a highly dangerous and destructive drug.”
  • A news report might state, “Authorities arrested several individuals involved in the distribution of crack cocaine rocks.”

30. White

White is a slang term for cocaine, a highly addictive and illegal stimulant drug. It is called white due to its powdery and crystalline appearance, which is often white or off-white in color.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s been snorting white for years.”
  • In a discussion about drug addiction, a person might mention, “White is a dangerous and destructive drug.”
  • A news article might report, “Law enforcement seized a large quantity of white during a drug raid.”

31. Snow

Snow is a slang term for cocaine, a powerful stimulant drug. The term “snow” is commonly used due to the white, powdery appearance of cocaine.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s been hitting the snow pretty hard lately.”
  • In a conversation about drug use, a person might ask, “Have you ever tried snow?”
  • A warning about the dangers of cocaine might include, “Using snow can lead to addiction and serious health problems.”

32. Blow

Blow is a slang term for cocaine. It refers to the powdered form of the drug that is typically snorted.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He’s been doing a lot of blow lately.”
  • In a discussion about drug use, a person might ask, “Have you ever tried blow?”
  • A warning about the dangers of cocaine might include, “Using blow can have serious consequences for your health and well-being.”

33. Dust

Dust is a slang term for cocaine. It refers to the powdered form of the drug that is typically snorted.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s been snorting a lot of dust.”
  • In a conversation about drug use, a person might ask, “Have you ever tried dust?”
  • A warning about the dangers of cocaine might include, “Using dust can lead to addiction and severe health problems.”

34. Powder

Powder is a slang term for cocaine. It refers to the powdered form of the drug that is typically snorted.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He’s been using a lot of powder lately.”
  • In a discussion about drug use, a person might ask, “Have you ever tried powder?”
  • A warning about the dangers of cocaine might include, “Using powder can have serious consequences for your health and overall well-being.”

35. Chalk

Chalk is a slang term for cocaine. It refers to the white, powdery appearance of the drug.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s been snorting a lot of chalk.”
  • In a conversation about drug use, a person might ask, “Have you ever tried chalk?”
  • A warning about the dangers of cocaine might include, “Using chalk can lead to addiction and detrimental effects on your physical and mental health.”

36. Flake

This term refers to cocaine, a powerful stimulant drug that is usually in the form of a white powder. “Flake” is a slang term used to describe cocaine due to its flaky texture.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s addicted to flake and can’t seem to quit.”
  • In a conversation about drug use, a person might ask, “Have you ever tried flake?”
  • A warning about the dangers of drug use might include, “Flake can lead to serious health problems and addiction.”

37. Yayo

This slang term is used to refer to cocaine. It originated from the song “Yayo” by rapper Snootie Wild, which became popular in the hip-hop community.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He’s always carrying around a bag of yayo.”
  • In a discussion about drug culture, a person might mention, “Yayo is a common street name for cocaine.”
  • A warning about the risks of drug addiction might include, “Using yayo can have severe consequences for your health and well-being.”

38. Nose candy

This slang term is used to describe cocaine, a highly addictive stimulant drug. “Nose candy” refers to the practice of snorting cocaine, which involves inhaling the powder through the nose.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s always sniffing nose candy at parties.”
  • In a conversation about drug use, a person might ask, “Have you ever tried nose candy?”
  • A warning about the dangers of drug addiction might include, “Regular use of nose candy can lead to serious health problems and dependency.”

39. Charlie

This slang term is commonly used to refer to cocaine, a powerful stimulant drug. The origin of the term is unclear, but it has been used in popular culture and drug subcultures for many years.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He’s addicted to Charlie and can’t seem to quit.”
  • In a discussion about drug use, a person might mention, “Charlie is a common street name for cocaine.”
  • A warning about the risks of drug addiction might include, “Using Charlie can have severe consequences for your physical and mental health.”

40. Toot

This slang term is used to describe cocaine, a stimulant drug that is usually in the form of a white powder. “Toot” refers to the act of snorting cocaine, which involves inhaling the powder through the nose.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s always taking a toot of cocaine before going out.”
  • In a conversation about drug use, a person might ask, “Have you ever done a toot of coke?”
  • A warning about the dangers of drug addiction might include, “Regular tooting of cocaine can lead to serious health problems and addiction.”

41. C

This term is short for crystal methamphetamine, a highly addictive and potent stimulant drug. It is often referred to as “C” in slang.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s addicted to C and it’s ruining his life.”
  • In a discussion about drug abuse, a person might mention, “C is one of the most dangerous and addictive drugs out there.”
  • A news article might report, “Authorities seized a large quantity of C in a drug bust.”

42. Skag

Skag is a slang term for heroin, a highly addictive and illegal opioid drug. It is often used in street or drug culture.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He’s hooked on skag and desperately needs help.”
  • In a conversation about the opioid crisis, a person might mention, “Skag is one of the most dangerous and deadly drugs.”
  • A news headline might read, “Police arrest skag dealer in major drug operation.”

43. Junk

Junk is a slang term for heroin, a highly addictive and illegal opioid drug. It is often used in street or drug culture.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s been shooting up junk for years.”
  • In a discussion about the dangers of drug addiction, a person might mention, “Junk can destroy lives and communities.”
  • A news report might state, “Authorities seized a stash of junk in a drug raid.”

44. Smack

Smack is a slang term for heroin, a highly addictive and illegal opioid drug. It is often used in street or drug culture.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He’s strung out on smack and needs help.”
  • In a conversation about the opioid epidemic, a person might mention, “Smack is ruining lives and causing overdoses.”
  • A news headline might read, “Police arrest smack dealer in drug bust.”

45. H

H is a slang term for heroin, a highly addictive and illegal opioid drug. It is often used in street or drug culture.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s addicted to H and it’s destroying his life.”
  • In a discussion about the opioid crisis, a person might mention, “H is a deadly and powerful drug.”
  • A news article might report, “Authorities seize large quantities of H in major drug operation.”

46. Horse

“Horse” is a slang term for heroin, a highly addictive and illegal opioid drug derived from morphine. The term “horse” is believed to have originated from the brown color of heroin, which resembles a horse’s coat.

  • For example, a drug addict might say, “I need a fix of horse to get through the day.”
  • In a discussion about the opioid crisis, a healthcare professional might mention, “Heroin, also known as horse, is a major contributor to the epidemic.”
  • A law enforcement officer might report, “We seized several grams of horse during the drug bust.”

47. Dope

While “dope” can refer to various drugs, in the context of slang for clear, it often refers to crystal methamphetamine. Crystal meth is a potent and highly addictive stimulant that affects the central nervous system. The term “dope” is used to describe the drug’s intense and euphoric effects.

  • For instance, a drug user might say, “I’m going to smoke some dope tonight.”
  • In a conversation about drug abuse, someone might mention, “Crystal meth, also known as dope, can have devastating effects on a person’s health.”
  • A rehab counselor might discuss the challenges of treating individuals addicted to dope.

48. Black tar

Black tar is a specific form of heroin that is dark brown or black in appearance. The term “black tar” refers to the sticky and tar-like consistency of this type of heroin. It is typically produced in Mexico and is commonly found in the western United States.

  • For example, a drug user might say, “I scored some black tar to get high.”
  • In a discussion about the different forms of heroin, someone might mention, “Black tar heroin is known for its distinct appearance and potent effects.”
  • A law enforcement officer might report, “We seized a significant amount of black tar during a drug raid.”

49. Brown sugar

Brown sugar is another slang term for heroin. The term “brown sugar” refers to the brownish color of the drug, which is often in powder form. It is a highly addictive opioid that produces a euphoric and sedative effect.

  • For instance, a drug addict might say, “I need some brown sugar to get through the day.”
  • In a conversation about the dangers of drug addiction, a healthcare professional might mention, “Brown sugar, also known as heroin, can have devastating effects on a person’s life.”
  • A social worker might discuss the challenges of helping individuals struggling with addiction to brown sugar.

50. China white

China white is a slang term for fentanyl, a synthetic opioid that is many times more potent than heroin. The term “China white” refers to the drug’s white powder form and its association with illicit drug trade from East Asia.

  • For example, a drug user might say, “I got some China white, it’s really strong.”
  • In a discussion about the opioid crisis, a healthcare professional might mention, “China white, also known as fentanyl, is responsible for a significant number of overdose deaths.”
  • A law enforcement officer might report, “We confiscated a large quantity of China white during a drug bust.”

51. Skunk

Skunk is a term used to describe a type of marijuana that has a strong and pungent odor. It is known for its potent effects and high THC content.

  • For example, “I smoked some skunk last night and got really high.”
  • A user might ask, “Where can I find some good skunk around here?”
  • Someone might comment, “Be careful with skunk, it’s really strong stuff.”

52. Weed

Weed is a common slang term for marijuana, which is a psychoactive drug derived from the Cannabis plant. It is often smoked or consumed for its mind-altering effects.

  • For instance, “Let’s go smoke some weed.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have any weed?”
  • Someone might say, “I love the smell of fresh weed.”

53. Pot

Pot is another term for marijuana, referring to the dried leaves and flowers of the Cannabis plant. It is commonly used in both recreational and medicinal contexts.

  • For example, “I’m going to roll a joint with some pot.”
  • A user might ask, “Have you tried this new strain of pot?”
  • Someone might comment, “I prefer smoking pot over other methods of consumption.”

54. Grass

Grass is a slang term for marijuana, referring to the green and leafy appearance of the plant. It is often used casually and informally to describe the drug.

  • For instance, “Let’s go smoke some grass in the park.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you know where I can buy some good grass?”
  • Someone might say, “I used to hide my stash of grass under my bed.”

55. Herb

Herb is a slang term for marijuana, which is derived from the plant’s herbal nature. It is commonly used to refer to the drug in a more relaxed and natural context.

  • For example, “Let’s roll a joint with some herb.”
  • A user might ask, “Do you have any good herb?”
  • Someone might comment, “I love the taste of fresh herb when smoking.”

56. Bud

Bud is a term used to refer to the flower of the marijuana plant. It is the part of the plant that is harvested and consumed for its psychoactive effects.

  • For example, “I just picked up some fresh bud from the dispensary.”
  • A user might post, “Check out this beautiful bud I found in my stash.”
  • Someone might ask, “What’s your favorite strain for a good bud?”

57. Ganja

Ganja is a term used to refer to marijuana or cannabis. It is often associated with the Rastafarian culture and is used globally as a slang term for the plant.

  • For instance, “Let’s roll up some ganja and relax.”
  • A person might say, “I love the smell of fresh ganja.”
  • Someone might ask, “Where can I find good quality ganja in this city?”

58. Mary Jane

Mary Jane is a slang term commonly used to refer to marijuana. It is often used in a playful or affectionate manner.

  • For example, “Let’s go light up some Mary Jane.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been enjoying some good Mary Jane lately.”
  • Someone might ask, “What’s your favorite way to consume Mary Jane?”

59. Reefer

Reefer is a term used to refer to a marijuana cigarette. It is derived from the term “refer madness” and is often used to describe a rolled joint or a pre-rolled cannabis cigarette.

  • For instance, “Wanna smoke a reefer with me?”
  • A person might say, “I rolled a fat reefer for later.”
  • Someone might ask, “Do you prefer joints or reefers?”

60. Sticky icky

Sticky icky is a term used to describe high-quality marijuana that is sticky to the touch. It is often used to indicate that the marijuana is potent or of superior quality.

  • For example, “I just got some sticky icky, it’s gonna get us really high.”
  • A person might say, “The buds are so sticky icky, they’re hard to break apart.”
  • Someone might ask, “Where can I find some good sticky icky in this area?”

61. Loud

This term refers to high-quality and potent marijuana. It is used to describe cannabis strains that have a strong and intense effect.

  • For example, someone might say, “That strain is loud, it’ll hit you hard.”
  • In a discussion about different types of marijuana, a user might comment, “I prefer loud strains for a more intense high.”
  • Another might ask, “Where can I find some loud weed around here?”

62. Chronic

This term is used to describe high-quality marijuana that is potent and has a strong effect. It is often associated with top-grade cannabis.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I got some chronic weed, it’s really strong.”
  • In a conversation about different strains, a user might mention, “Chronic is known for its powerful and long-lasting effects.”
  • Another might ask, “Where can I buy some chronic buds?”

63. Dank

This term is used to describe high-quality marijuana that is potent and has a strong aroma and taste. It is often associated with top-grade cannabis.

  • For example, someone might say, “This weed is dank, it smells amazing.”
  • In a discussion about different types of marijuana, a user might comment, “Dank strains are my favorite, they always deliver a great experience.”
  • Another might ask, “What’s the dankest strain you’ve ever tried?”

64. Hydro

This term refers to marijuana that is grown using hydroponics, a method of growing plants without soil. Hydroponically grown marijuana is known for its high potency and quality.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I prefer hydro weed because it’s usually cleaner and stronger.”
  • In a conversation about different cultivation methods, a user might mention, “Hydroponically grown marijuana tends to have higher THC levels.”
  • Another might ask, “Where can I find some good hydro buds?”

65. Green

This term is a general slang for marijuana. It is often used to refer to the plant itself or the dried leaves and flowers that are consumed for their psychoactive effects.

  • For example, someone might say, “Let’s go smoke some green.”
  • In a discussion about different strains, a user might comment, “I like trying different greens to see which ones I like the most.”
  • Another might ask, “What’s your favorite way to consume green?”

66. Benjamins

This term refers to U.S. currency, specifically the one hundred dollar bill featuring the portrait of Benjamin Franklin. It is often used to signify wealth or large amounts of money.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just made a stack of Benjamins from my side hustle.”
  • In a discussion about financial success, a person might say, “I’m all about chasing those Benjamins.”
  • A rapper might boast, “I’m making it rain Benjamins in the club tonight.”

67. Dough

This slang term is used to refer to money, particularly in the form of cash. It originated from the similarity between dough, the mixture used to make bread, and money, which both have a soft and malleable quality.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to save up some dough before I can go on vacation.”
  • In a conversation about financial struggles, a person might say, “I’m always trying to figure out how to make more dough.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you lend me some dough? I’m short on cash right now.”

68. Cash

This term is a common slang word for money, specifically referring to physical currency in the form of bills or coins. It is used to indicate the availability of immediate payment or the need for physical currency.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to withdraw some cash from the ATM.”
  • In a discussion about financial transactions, a person might say, “I prefer to pay with cash whenever possible.”
  • A friend might ask, “Do you have any cash on you? I forgot my wallet.”

69. Moola

This slang term is used to refer to money, often in a playful or lighthearted manner. It is believed to have originated from the Yiddish word “mula,” meaning money.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I just won a bunch of moola in a poker game.”
  • In a conversation about financial success, a person might say, “I’m all about making that moola.”
  • A friend might ask, “Want to go out for dinner? I’ve got the moola.”

70. Bread

This slang term is used to refer to money, with “bread” representing a metaphorical staple food that is essential for survival. It is often used to denote a person’s financial resources or income.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to find a job to earn some bread.”
  • In a discussion about financial stability, a person might say, “I’m working hard to bring home the bread for my family.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you spot me some bread? I forgot my wallet.”

71. Cheddar

This slang term is used to refer to money, specifically large sums of cash. It is often associated with wealth or financial success.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m making mad cheddar at my new job.”
  • In a conversation about finances, one might ask, “How much cheddar do you have saved up?”
  • A person showing off their expensive possessions might say, “Check out my new car, paid for with cheddar.”

72. Stacks

This term refers to a large amount of money, usually in the form of cash. It is often used to emphasize the wealth or financial success of an individual.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m making stacks of cash at my new business.”
  • In a discussion about expensive purchases, one might say, “I dropped stacks on a new designer handbag.”
  • A person boasting about their financial status might say, “I’ve got stacks on stacks in my bank account.”

73. Paper

This slang term is used to refer to money, especially cash. It is derived from the idea that money is made of paper.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to go make some paper to pay my bills.”
  • In a conversation about finances, one might ask, “How much paper do you have on you?”
  • A person talking about their income might say, “I’m earning good paper at my new job.”

74. Loot

This term is used to refer to money, especially in a casual or colloquial context. It can also refer to stolen or ill-gotten gains.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I found a way to make some quick loot.”
  • In a discussion about financial struggles, one might say, “I’m trying to save up some loot for a vacation.”
  • A person talking about a successful business venture might say, “We’re raking in the loot with this new product.”

75. Scratch

This slang term is used to refer to money, particularly in the context of earning or acquiring it. It can also refer to the act of making money.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to find a way to make some scratch.”
  • In a conversation about finances, one might ask, “How much scratch do you have saved up?”
  • A person talking about a profitable job might say, “I’m making good scratch at my new gig.”

76. Cheese

In slang terms, “cheese” is often used to refer to money. It is a common term used in the hip-hop community and urban settings.

  • For example, a person might say, “I need to hustle and make some cheese.”
  • In a discussion about finances, someone might ask, “How can I make more cheese?”
  • A rapper might boast, “I’m stacking cheese, making moves in the industry.”

77. Guap

“Guap” is a slang term used to describe a large amount of money. It is often used in the hip-hop community and urban culture.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I just got paid, now I’m rolling in guap.”
  • In a conversation about financial success, a person might mention, “I’m trying to stack guap and build generational wealth.”
  • A rapper might flaunt their wealth by saying, “I’m dripping in designer, spending guap like it’s nothing.”

78. Bands

In slang terms, “bands” is a term used to refer to a large amount of money. It is often associated with the hip-hop community and urban culture.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m making bands, I can’t be stopped.”
  • In a discussion about financial goals, a person might say, “I’m trying to stack bands and secure my future.”
  • A rapper might boast about their wealth by saying, “I’m flexing, throwing bands in the club.”

79. Cabbage

In slang terms, “cabbage” is often used to refer to money. It is a playful and informal way to talk about cash.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to get my hands on some cabbage.”
  • In a conversation about finances, a person might ask, “How much cabbage do you have saved?”
  • A friend might offer to lend money by saying, “Here, take some cabbage, you’ll pay me back later.”

80. Coin

In slang terms, “coin” is often used to refer to money. It is a casual and colloquial way to talk about cash.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to start earning some coin.”
  • In a discussion about financial success, a person might mention, “I’m trying to make enough coin to travel the world.”
  • A friend might ask, “Do you have any spare coin? I need to buy lunch.”

81. Wad

In slang terms, “wad” refers to a bundle of cash, typically in large denominations. It can also be used to mean a large amount of anything.

  • For example, someone might say, “He pulled out a wad of hundred-dollar bills to pay for dinner.”
  • In a discussion about savings, one might mention, “I’ve been able to save up a nice wad of money for emergencies.”
  • A person might brag, “I won big at the casino and walked away with a wad of cash.”

82. Bank

In slang, “bank” is used to refer to a large amount of money or wealth. It can also be used as a verb meaning to make a lot of money.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He’s making bank with his new business venture.”
  • In a conversation about financial success, one might mention, “I’m trying to save up enough to have a comfortable bank.”
  • A person might joke, “If I had a dollar for every time someone asked me for money, I’d be banking.”

83. Crispy

In the context of slang for clear, “crispy” is used to describe clear and pure methamphetamine. It can also be used to describe something that is clean, well-maintained, or in perfect condition.

  • For example, someone might say, “That batch of meth is really crispy.”
  • In a discussion about drug use, one might mention, “I prefer crispy meth because it gives a stronger high.”
  • A person might compliment a well-maintained car by saying, “Your car looks so crispy, like it just rolled off the showroom floor.”

84. Shards

In the context of slang for clear, “shards” refers to crystal methamphetamine, which typically appears as clear or translucent crystals. It can also be used to describe broken pieces or fragments of glass or other hard substances.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He’s addicted to shards.”
  • In a conversation about drug addiction, one might mention, “Shards can cause severe health problems.”
  • A person might describe a broken window by saying, “There are shards of glass everywhere.”

85. Tina

In slang terms, “tina” is a nickname for methamphetamine. It is often used to refer to crystal meth, which can appear as clear or translucent crystals. The term is commonly used in the LGBTQ+ community.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m going out to party with Tina tonight.”
  • In a discussion about drug abuse, one might mention, “Tina is a highly addictive and dangerous drug.”
  • A person might warn others by saying, “Stay away from Tina, it will ruin your life.”

86. Crank

Crank is a slang term for methamphetamine, a highly addictive stimulant drug that affects the central nervous system. It is typically found in powder or crystal form and can be smoked, snorted, or injected. The term “crank” is often used to refer to methamphetamine in its crystal form.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s been up for days on crank.”
  • In a discussion about drug addiction, one might mention, “Crank is a dangerous and illegal substance.”
  • A person sharing their experience might say, “I used to be hooked on crank, but I’ve been clean for three years now.”

87. Meth

Meth is short for methamphetamine, which is a powerful and highly addictive stimulant drug. It can be smoked, snorted, injected, or swallowed. Methamphetamine increases dopamine production in the brain, leading to intense feelings of euphoria and energy.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He’s addicted to meth.”
  • In a discussion about the dangers of drug use, one might mention, “Methamphetamine can cause severe physical and mental health problems.”
  • A recovering addict might share their story, saying, “I hit rock bottom when I was using meth, but now I’m in recovery.”

88. Angel dust

Angel dust is a street name for phencyclidine (PCP), a hallucinogenic drug that was originally developed as an anesthetic. It can be found in powder, liquid, or tablet form and is typically smoked, snorted, or ingested. The term “angel dust” is often used to refer to PCP due to its ability to induce dissociation and hallucinations.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s acting crazy because he’s on angel dust.”
  • In a discussion about drug abuse, one might mention, “Angel dust can cause unpredictable and dangerous behavior.”
  • A person sharing their experience might say, “I had a terrifying trip on angel dust and vowed to never touch it again.”

89. Wet

Wet is a slang term that typically refers to PCP (phencyclidine) or marijuana laced with PCP. PCP, also known as angel dust, is a hallucinogenic drug, and when combined with marijuana, it can enhance the effects of both substances. The term “wet” comes from the liquid form of PCP that is often applied to marijuana cigarettes.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He’s smoking wet.”
  • In a discussion about drug culture, one might mention, “Wet is a dangerous and unpredictable combination.”
  • A person sharing their experience might say, “I had a bad trip after smoking wet and ended up in the hospital.”

90. Sherm

Sherm is a slang term for a cigarette or joint that has been laced with PCP (phencyclidine). PCP is a hallucinogenic drug that can cause dissociation and intense hallucinations. The term “sherm” is often used to refer to a PCP-laced cigarette or joint.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s smoking sherm.”
  • In a discussion about drug addiction, one might mention, “Sherm can have severe and long-lasting effects on the brain.”
  • A person sharing their experience might say, “I had a terrifying trip after smoking sherm and vowed to stay away from it.”

91. Pristine

This word is used to describe something that is in perfect condition or completely clean. It can also be used to describe something that is pure or untouched.

  • For example, “The crystal-clear lake was pristine and untouched by human activity.”
  • When talking about a new car, someone might say, “The paint job is pristine, with no scratches or dents.”
  • Another example could be, “The wedding dress was pristine, with not a single wrinkle or stain.”

92. Unclouded

This word is used to describe something that is completely clear or free from any obstructions or confusion. It can also refer to a clear state of mind or a clear understanding of something.

  • For instance, “After a good night’s sleep, her mind was unclouded and she could think clearly.”
  • In a discussion about a complex topic, someone might say, “Let’s try to have an unclouded understanding of the issue.”
  • Another example could be, “The weather forecast predicts unclouded skies for the entire week.”

93. Pure

This word is used to describe something that is completely clear, free from any impurities or contaminants. It can also be used to describe something that is unadulterated or genuine.

  • For example, “The water in the mountain stream was pure and crystal clear.”
  • When discussing a person’s intentions, someone might say, “Her motives are pure and she only wants to help.”
  • Another example could be, “The singer’s voice was pure and filled with emotion.”

94. Sheer

This word is used to describe something that is completely clear or see-through. It can also refer to something that is extremely thin or delicate.

  • For instance, “The sheer curtains allowed the sunlight to filter into the room.”
  • When talking about a fabric, someone might say, “The dress was made of sheer material, giving it an elegant and delicate look.”
  • Another example could be, “The glass was so sheer that it seemed to disappear, creating the illusion of an open space.”

95. Translucent

This word is used to describe something that is partially clear or allows some light to pass through, but is not completely transparent. It can also refer to something that is delicate or subtle in appearance.

  • For example, “The frosted glass window was translucent, allowing some light to enter the room.”
  • When describing a gemstone, someone might say, “The translucent opal had a beautiful play of colors.”
  • Another example could be, “The delicate wings of the butterfly were translucent, creating a stunning visual effect.”

96. Unobstructed

This term refers to something that is free from any barriers or blockages. It is often used to describe a clear path or view.

  • For example, “The hiker enjoyed an unobstructed view of the mountains from the summit.”
  • In a discussion about traffic, someone might say, “We need to keep the roads unobstructed for emergency vehicles.”
  • A photographer might seek an unobstructed shot by saying, “I need a clear view of the subject, without any people in the frame.”

97. Undiluted

This slang term is used to describe something that is in its purest form, without any dilution or alteration.

  • For instance, “She prefers undiluted orange juice without any added water.”
  • In a conversation about alcohol, someone might say, “I like my whiskey undiluted, straight from the bottle.”
  • A person describing their feelings might say, “My love for you is undiluted, pure and strong.”

98. Uncloudy

This word is used to describe a sky that is clear and free from clouds or fog. It can also be used metaphorically to describe a situation or state of mind that is clear and without confusion.

  • For example, “We had a picnic under an uncloudy sky.”
  • In a discussion about decision-making, someone might say, “We need to have uncloudy minds to make the right choices.”
  • A person describing their thoughts might say, “After a good night’s sleep, my mind feels uncloudy and focused.”

99. Open

This term is used to describe something that is clear, transparent, or easily understood.

  • For instance, “The instructions for assembling the furniture were open and easy to follow.”
  • In a conversation about communication, someone might say, “We need to have open and clear lines of communication to avoid misunderstandings.”
  • A person describing their intentions might say, “I want to be open with you and share my true feelings.”

100. Crystalline

This word is used to describe something that is clear, transparent, and resembles a crystal in its appearance.

  • For example, “The lake water was so clear and crystalline that you could see the fish swimming.”
  • In a discussion about gemstones, someone might say, “The diamond’s cut and clarity make it appear incredibly crystalline.”
  • A person describing their vision might say, “After wearing glasses, the world became more crystalline and vibrant.”

101. Glassy

This term is often used to describe a surface that is clear and reflective, like glass. It can also be used metaphorically to describe a person’s appearance or demeanor.

  • For example, “The lake was so calm and glassy, you could see your reflection.”
  • A surfer might say, “The waves were glassy this morning, perfect for catching some waves.”
  • A person might describe someone’s eyes as “glassy” to indicate a clear and focused look.
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102. Limpid

This word is used to describe something that is clear, transparent, or easily understood. It can refer to physical objects, emotions, or thoughts.

  • For instance, “The limpid water of the river allowed us to see the fish swimming.”
  • A person might say, “Her limpid eyes revealed her true feelings.”
  • A writer might describe a character’s thoughts as “limpid” to indicate clarity and simplicity.

103. Uncluttered

This term is used to describe something that is clear and free from clutter or obstacles. It can refer to physical spaces, thoughts, or ideas.

  • For example, “Her uncluttered desk allowed her to focus on her work.”
  • A person might say, “I prefer an uncluttered mind to avoid distractions.”
  • A designer might describe a minimalist room as “uncluttered” to indicate a clean and simple aesthetic.

104. Unblemished

This word is used to describe something that is clear and free from any marks, scars, or imperfections. It can refer to physical objects, surfaces, or even reputations.

  • For instance, “The unblemished mirror reflected a perfect image.”
  • A person might say, “Her unblemished skin is the result of a good skincare routine.”
  • A company might promote a product as “unblemished” to indicate its high quality and flawless condition.