Top 44 Slang For Collective – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to referring to a group of individuals in a unique and catchy way, slang for collective terms adds a fun twist to our language. Whether you’re a language enthusiast or just looking to spice up your vocabulary, this listicle is sure to provide you with some fresh and exciting terms to use in your everyday conversations. Stay ahead of the curve and impress your friends with these trendy collective slang expressions!

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1. Crew

A crew refers to a group of people working together towards a common goal or objective. It can be used in various contexts, such as in a work setting or in a sports team.

  • For example, “The film crew worked tirelessly to shoot the movie.”
  • In a discussion about a project, someone might say, “Let’s assemble a crew to tackle this task.”
  • A sports commentator might say, “The basketball team’s crew showed great teamwork in their last game.”

2. Squad

A squad is a close-knit group of friends or teammates who often spend time together and support each other. It is commonly used in social and recreational contexts.

  • For instance, “I’m going out tonight with my squad.”
  • A person might say, “I have the best squad ever!”
  • In a sports context, a coach might say, “Our soccer squad is ready for the upcoming match.”

3. Team

A team refers to a group of individuals who come together to work towards a common goal or objective. It is commonly used in professional, academic, and sports settings.

  • For example, “The sales team successfully exceeded their target for the quarter.”
  • In a discussion about a project, someone might say, “Let’s divide into teams and assign tasks.”
  • A sports commentator might say, “The football team demonstrated exceptional teamwork in their last match.”

4. Gang

A gang is an organized group of individuals, often involved in criminal activities. It is commonly associated with street culture and can have negative connotations.

  • For instance, “The police arrested several members of the gang.”
  • In a discussion about crime, someone might say, “Gangs are a major issue in this neighborhood.”
  • A news report might state, “The gang was involved in drug trafficking and other illicit activities.”

5. Posse

A posse refers to a close group of friends or supporters who are loyal to each other and often stick together. It is commonly used in informal and social contexts.

  • For example, “I’m going to the party with my posse.”
  • A person might say, “I have the best posse anyone could ask for!”
  • In a discussion about support systems, someone might say, “My posse always has my back.”

6. Tribe

A tribe refers to a social group made up of people who share common ancestry, traditions, and culture. It can also be used to describe a close-knit community or a group of people who share similar interests or goals.

  • For example, “The tribe gathered around the fire to celebrate their harvest festival.”
  • In a discussion about music fandoms, someone might say, “I’m part of the Beyhive tribe.”
  • A person describing their friend group might say, “We’re like a tribe, always there for each other.”

7. Pack

A pack is a term used to describe a close group of friends or a tight-knit community. It can also refer to a group of people who work together or share a common purpose.

  • For instance, “We’re going out tonight with our pack of friends.”
  • In a conversation about a sports team, someone might say, “The pack played exceptionally well in the championship.”
  • A person describing their work colleagues might say, “We’re a pack of talented individuals, always supporting each other.”

8. Band

A band can refer to a group of musicians who play together, usually with specific instruments and roles. It can also be used to describe a group of people who work together or share a common purpose.

  • For example, “I’m going to see my favorite band perform live tonight.”
  • In a discussion about a successful startup, someone might say, “The band of co-founders worked tirelessly to bring their idea to life.”
  • A person talking about their travel companions might say, “We’re a band of adventurers, exploring new places together.”

9. Ensemble

An ensemble is a term commonly used in the performing arts to describe a group of performers who work together to create a cohesive performance. It can also be used more broadly to refer to any group of people who collaborate or work together.

  • For instance, “The ensemble cast delivered an outstanding performance in the play.”
  • In a conversation about a dance troupe, someone might say, “The ensemble moves with such grace and precision.”
  • A person describing their work team might say, “We’re an ensemble of talented individuals, bringing our unique skills together.”

10. Clan

A clan refers to a group of people who are related by blood or marriage and share a common ancestor. It can also be used more loosely to describe a close-knit group or community.

  • For example, “The clan gathers every year for a reunion to celebrate their shared heritage.”
  • In a discussion about a group of friends, someone might say, “We’re like a clan, always there for each other.”
  • A person describing their neighborhood might say, “We’re a tight-knit clan, looking out for one another.”

11. Clique

A small, exclusive group of people who share similar interests or social status. A clique often forms based on shared characteristics or activities, and members may be seen as being exclusive or elitist.

  • For example, in high school, you might hear someone say, “She’s part of the popular clique.”
  • A person discussing social dynamics might say, “Cliques can sometimes create division and exclusion within a larger community.”
  • In a workplace setting, someone might say, “The marketing team is a tight-knit clique that always sticks together.”

12. Mob

A large, unruly group of people, often characterized by disorderly or violent behavior. The term “mob” is typically used to describe a group of people who act together with a common purpose or goal, often in a chaotic or aggressive manner.

  • For instance, during a protest, you might hear someone say, “The mob started throwing rocks at the police.”
  • In a historical context, the term might be used to describe a group of rioters, such as, “The mob stormed the government building.”
  • A person discussing crowd psychology might explain, “A mob mentality can lead to irrational and destructive behavior.”

13. Horde

A large, disorderly crowd of people, often characterized by a lack of organization or control. The term “horde” typically refers to a large group of people who are moving or acting together, often with a sense of chaos or disarray.

  • For example, at a music festival, you might say, “There was a horde of people pushing towards the stage.”
  • In a crowded market, someone might comment, “The horde of shoppers made it difficult to move.”
  • A person discussing the aftermath of a sporting event might say, “The horde of fans flooded the streets, celebrating the victory.”

14. Swarm

A large number of people or things moving or acting together in a coordinated or unified manner. The term “swarm” often implies a sense of movement or activity, as if the group is moving together as a cohesive unit.

  • For instance, during a sale at a store, you might hear someone say, “There was a swarm of shoppers trying to grab the best deals.”
  • In a crowded city, one might comment, “The streets were filled with a swarm of people during rush hour.”
  • A person discussing a protest might say, “The swarm of demonstrators marched through the streets, demanding change.”

15. Collective

A group of individuals who come together for a common purpose or goal. The term “collective” often implies a sense of unity and cooperation among the members of the group.

  • For example, in a workplace, you might hear someone say, “The collective effort of the team led to the successful completion of the project.”
  • A person discussing activism might say, “The collective voice of the community brought about real change.”
  • In a creative setting, someone might comment, “The collective talent of the band produced an incredible album.”

16. Bunch

This term refers to a collection of people or things that are gathered or grouped together. It is often used to describe a casual or informal gathering.

  • For example, “Let’s get a bunch of friends together and go to the movies.”
  • Someone might say, “I have a bunch of books that I need to donate.”
  • In a conversation about fruit, one might mention, “I bought a bunch of bananas at the grocery store.”

17. Company

In this context, “company” refers to a group of people who work together or share a common purpose. It is often used to describe a team or staff working in a specific organization or industry.

  • For instance, “I work in a software development company.”
  • Someone might say, “Our company just launched a new product.”
  • In a conversation about military units, one might mention, “A company consists of multiple platoons.”

18. Troop

This term typically refers to a group of soldiers or military personnel who work together as a unit. It can also be used to describe a group of people who move or act together.

  • For example, “The troop marched in formation.”
  • Someone might say, “We need a troop of volunteers to help with the event.”
  • In a discussion about scouting, one might mention, “A troop is made up of several patrols.”

19. Battalion

In this context, “battalion” refers to a large military unit consisting of several hundred soldiers. It is often used to describe a specific division or group within a larger army.

  • For instance, “The 101st Airborne Division is a well-known battalion.”
  • Someone might say, “The battalion was deployed to the front lines.”
  • In a conversation about military strategy, one might mention, “A battalion is typically commanded by a lieutenant colonel.”

20. Platoon

This term typically refers to a small unit of soldiers within a larger military formation. It is often used to describe a group of soldiers who work closely together and carry out specific tasks or missions.

  • For example, “The platoon conducted a reconnaissance mission.”
  • Someone might say, “I served in a platoon during my time in the military.”
  • In a discussion about military organization, one might mention, “A platoon is typically led by a lieutenant.”

21. Regiment

A military unit composed of multiple battalions, typically commanded by a colonel. “Regiment” is often used in a military context to refer to a group of soldiers or a specific branch of the armed forces.

  • For example, “The 101st Airborne Regiment is known for their expertise in airborne operations.”
  • In a discussion about military history, one might mention, “The British Army’s Coldstream Guards is the oldest regiment in continuous existence.”
  • A military enthusiast might say, “Regiments often have their own unique traditions and uniforms.”

22. Division

A large military formation composed of multiple brigades or regiments, typically commanded by a major general. “Division” is a term used to describe a higher level of organization within the military, often consisting of thousands of soldiers.

  • For instance, “The 1st Infantry Division played a crucial role in many major battles during World War II.”
  • In a discussion about military strategy, one might say, “Divisions are often deployed as a self-contained fighting force.”
  • A military historian might mention, “The Roman army used a similar concept of divisions called ‘legions.'”

23. Squadron

A military unit consisting of multiple aircraft, typically commanded by a major or lieutenant colonel. “Squadron” is a term used in the air force to refer to a group of aircraft or a specific branch within the air force.

  • For example, “The 56th Fighter Squadron is known for their expertise in aerial combat.”
  • In a discussion about aviation, one might mention, “Squadrons often have their own unique insignia and call signs.”
  • An aviation enthusiast might say, “Squadrons play a crucial role in air superiority and close air support missions.”

24. Fleet

A large group of naval vessels, typically commanded by an admiral. “Fleet” is a term used to describe a collection of ships or a specific branch within the navy.

  • For instance, “The US Navy’s Seventh Fleet operates in the Pacific Ocean.”
  • In a discussion about naval warfare, one might say, “A fleet is a powerful force capable of projecting military power across the seas.”
  • A naval historian might mention, “The Spanish Armada was a famous fleet that attempted to invade England in 1588.”

25. Brigade

A military formation composed of multiple battalions, typically commanded by a brigadier general. “Brigade” is a term used to describe a medium-sized unit within the military, often consisting of hundreds to thousands of soldiers.

  • For example, “The 82nd Airborne Brigade is known for their rapid deployment capabilities.”
  • In a discussion about ground warfare, one might mention, “Brigades are often deployed as part of a larger division.”
  • A military analyst might say, “Brigades are versatile units capable of conducting a wide range of military operations.”

26. Corps

A collective term used to refer to a organized body of people who work together for a common purpose. “Corps” is often used to describe a specific group within a larger organization or military.

  • For example, “The Peace Corps sends volunteers to help communities in need around the world.”
  • In a discussion about the military, someone might mention, “The Marine Corps is known for their discipline and toughness.”
  • A person discussing a dance company might say, “The ballet corps performs with grace and precision.”

27. Legion

A term used to describe a large group of people or things. “Legion” can imply a vast number or an overwhelming presence.

  • For instance, “Fans of the band turned out in legion to see their final concert.”
  • In a discussion about a popular TV show, someone might say, “The show has a legion of dedicated fans.”
  • A person describing a protest might say, “There was a legion of people marching for their rights.”

28. Alliance

An agreement or union between two or more parties for a specific purpose. “Alliance” often implies a strategic partnership or cooperation.

  • For example, “The two companies formed an alliance to collaborate on a new product.”
  • In a discussion about politics, someone might mention, “The alliance between the two parties helped secure the majority.”
  • A person discussing a sports team might say, “The players have formed a strong alliance on the field.”

29. Coalition

A temporary or formal alliance between different groups or individuals who come together for a common goal. “Coalition” often implies a diverse group working towards a shared objective.

  • For instance, “The coalition of environmental organizations is working to protect the rainforest.”
  • In a discussion about politics, someone might say, “The coalition government was formed to address the country’s economic crisis.”
  • A person discussing activism might mention, “The coalition of social justice groups is advocating for change.”

30. Union

A term used to describe a group of individuals who have come together for a common purpose, often related to labor rights or advocacy. “Union” can refer to a specific organization or the concept of collective action.

  • For example, “The teachers’ union negotiated for better working conditions.”
  • In a discussion about workers’ rights, someone might mention, “Unions have played a crucial role in improving workplace conditions.”
  • A person discussing a strike might say, “The union is demanding fair wages and benefits.”

31. Confederation

A confederation is a union or alliance of different groups or states that come together for a common purpose or goal. It is often used to refer to a political or economic union.

  • For example, “The European Union is a confederation of 27 member states.”
  • In a discussion about historical alliances, one might say, “The Iroquois Confederation was a powerful union of Native American tribes.”
  • A political commentator might argue, “A confederation allows for greater autonomy among member states while still promoting cooperation.”

32. Confederacy

A confederacy refers to a group of states or regions that have joined together for a common cause or purpose. It often implies a political or military alliance.

  • For instance, “During the American Civil War, the Confederate States of America seceded from the Union and formed a confederacy.”
  • In a discussion about historical conflicts, one might say, “The Delian League was a confederacy of Greek city-states formed to resist Persian aggression.”
  • A historian might explain, “A confederacy differs from a federation in that member states retain more sovereignty and independence.”

33. Cartel

A cartel is a group of businesses or organizations that join together to control and manipulate the market for a particular product or service. It often involves illegal or unethical practices.

  • For example, “The drug cartel controlled the distribution of narcotics in the region.”
  • In a discussion about organized crime, one might say, “The Mafia operated as a cartel, controlling various illegal activities.”
  • A business analyst might explain, “A cartel can lead to higher prices and reduced competition, harming consumers and other businesses.”

34. Assembly

An assembly refers to a group of people who come together for a specific purpose or event. It can also refer to a legislative body or governing body.

  • For instance, “The town held a public assembly to discuss the proposed development.”
  • In a discussion about government, one might say, “The National Assembly is responsible for passing laws and representing the people.”
  • A social activist might argue, “Peaceful assemblies are a fundamental right and a powerful tool for social change.”

35. Congregation

A congregation refers to a group of people who gather for religious worship or a religious community. It can also be used more broadly to describe any group of people gathered together.

  • For example, “The congregation sang hymns during the church service.”
  • In a discussion about social gatherings, one might say, “The park was filled with a congregation of families enjoying a picnic.”
  • A pastor might explain, “The congregation plays an important role in supporting and nurturing the spiritual growth of its members.”

36. League

A league refers to a group or organization that is formed for a specific purpose or common interest. It often implies a sense of unity and collaboration among its members.

  • For example, “The Justice League is a fictional group of superheroes.”
  • In sports, “The Premier League is one of the top professional soccer leagues in the world.”
  • A person might say, “We need to work together as a league to achieve our goals.”

37. Network

A network can refer to a group of people or organizations that are connected or associated with each other. It can also refer to the act of establishing and maintaining connections with others.

  • For instance, “I have a strong network of contacts in the tech industry.”
  • In business, “Networking events are a great way to expand your professional network.”
  • Someone might say, “Let’s network with other like-minded individuals to exchange ideas and opportunities.”

38. Hive

A hive refers to a group or community of individuals who work together towards a common goal or purpose. It often implies a sense of unity and collective effort.

  • For example, “Bees live in a hive and work together to produce honey.”
  • In fandoms, “The Beyhive is a dedicated community of Beyoncé fans.”
  • A person might say, “We need to come together as a hive to support each other and make a difference.”

39. Squadrons

A squadron is a military unit or team consisting of a specific number of members. It is often used to refer to a group of aircraft or naval vessels.

  • For instance, “The Air Force has multiple squadrons of fighter jets.”
  • In gaming, “A squadron is a team of players who work together in multiplayer battles.”
  • A person might say, “We need to train and coordinate as a squadron to execute the mission successfully.”

40. Force

Force can refer to a group or team of individuals who work together with a common purpose or objective. It often implies strength and determination in achieving a goal.

  • For example, “The police force is responsible for maintaining law and order.”
  • In Star Wars, “The Rebel Alliance is a force fighting against the Galactic Empire.”
  • A person might say, “We need to unite as a force to bring about positive change in our community.”

41. Unit

This term is often used to refer to a group of people who work together or share a common purpose. It can also be used to describe a team or squad in a military or sports context.

  • For example, a team leader might say, “Let’s work together as a unit to accomplish our goal.”
  • In a military setting, a commander might order, “Move out, unit!”
  • A sports coach might encourage their team by saying, “We need to play as a unit and support each other.”

42. Cell

This slang term is commonly used to describe a group of people, typically involved in criminal activities or organized crime. It can also refer to a close-knit group of friends or associates.

  • For instance, in a crime drama, a character might say, “I’m part of a powerful cell that controls this city.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might refer to their group of friends as their “crew” or “cell.”
  • A person discussing their social circle might mention, “I have a tight-knit cell of friends who have been with me through thick and thin.”

43. Society

This term is often used to describe a group of people who share common customs, values, and institutions. It can also refer to a specific group or organization within a larger society.

  • For example, someone might say, “We need to work together as a society to address these issues.”
  • In a discussion about social issues, a person might argue, “Our society should prioritize equality and inclusivity.”
  • A person might refer to a specific group within society by saying, “The scientific community plays a crucial role in advancing our society.”

44. Flock

This slang term is commonly used to describe a group of people or animals who are together in one place. It can also refer to a gathering or congregation of individuals.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Look at the flock of tourists taking pictures.”
  • In a religious context, a person might mention, “I attended a flock at the local church.”
  • A nature enthusiast might comment, “I observed a large flock of birds migrating south for the winter.”
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