Top 57 Slang For Comes From – Meaning & Usage

Slang has a way of evolving and adapting to different cultures and communities. Have you ever wondered where some of your favorite slang words and phrases come from? From the streets to social media, slang has a fascinating origin story that reflects the ever-changing nature of language. Join us as we delve into the etymology of popular slang terms and uncover the surprising roots behind the words we use every day. Get ready to expand your vocabulary and gain a deeper understanding of the linguistic landscape that shapes our conversations.

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1. Hails from

This phrase is used to describe the place or source from which someone or something originates. It implies that the person or thing has a strong association or connection with that place or source.

  • For example, “He hails from a small town in Texas.”
  • In a conversation about different musical genres, someone might say, “Jazz music hails from African-American communities in New Orleans.”
  • A sports commentator might mention, “The champion team hails from the Midwest.”

2. Springs from

This slang phrase is used to indicate the origin or source of something. It suggests that something has emerged or developed from a particular place or situation.

  • For instance, “Her creativity springs from her love for nature.”
  • In a discussion about cultural traditions, someone might say, “This festival springs from ancient rituals.”
  • A writer might explain, “The idea for this book springs from my personal experiences.”

3. Derives from

This phrase is used to describe the origin or source of something. It suggests that something has been obtained, taken, or developed from a specific place or thing.

  • For example, “The word ‘chocolate’ derives from the Aztec word ‘xocoatl’.”
  • In a conversation about scientific discoveries, someone might say, “This theory derives from extensive research.”
  • A historian might explain, “This tradition derives from ancient customs.”

4. Emerges from

This slang phrase is used to indicate the origin or source of something. It suggests that something has become visible, known, or established after being hidden or unknown.

  • For instance, “A new trend emerges from social media platforms.”
  • In a discussion about technological advancements, someone might say, “This innovation emerges from years of research.”
  • A journalist might report, “A new political movement emerges from grassroots activism.”

5. Stems from

This phrase is used to describe the source or cause of something. It suggests that something has developed or grown out of a particular situation or circumstance.

  • For example, “Her fear of dogs stems from a childhood incident.”
  • In a conversation about language evolution, someone might say, “Many English words stem from Latin.”
  • A psychologist might explain, “His behavior stems from unresolved trauma.”

6. Arises from

This phrase is used to indicate the origin or source of something. It suggests that something came into existence or developed from a specific source or cause.

  • For example, a historian might say, “The conflict arises from a long history of tensions between the two nations.”
  • In a discussion about the origins of a cultural tradition, someone might say, “This festival arises from ancient religious practices.”
  • A scientist explaining the cause of a phenomenon might say, “The issue arises from a combination of environmental factors.”

7. Traces back to

This phrase is used to indicate the historical or ancestral origin of something. It suggests that something can be followed or tracked to its original source or beginning.

  • For instance, a linguist might say, “The word ‘coffee’ traces back to the Arabic language.”
  • In a discussion about the evolution of a musical genre, someone might say, “This style of music traces back to African rhythms.”
  • A historian researching a family lineage might say, “We can trace this family’s history back to the 16th century.”

8. Evolves from

This phrase suggests that something has changed or developed over time from a previous form or state. It implies a process of growth or transformation.

  • For example, a biologist might say, “Birds evolved from dinosaurs.”
  • In a discussion about language, someone might say, “Slang terms often evolve from existing words or phrases.”
  • A technology expert might explain, “This new smartphone model evolves from previous iterations with added features and improvements.”

9. Roots from

This phrase suggests that something has its origins or beginnings in a particular source or cause. It implies a connection or relationship between the origin and the current form or state.

  • For instance, a chef might say, “This recipe roots from traditional Italian cuisine.”
  • In a discussion about cultural customs, someone might say, “This tradition roots from ancient rituals.”
  • A historian researching the origins of a civilization might say, “This civilization roots from a nomadic tribe that settled in the region.”

10. Originates in

This phrase indicates the specific place or point of origin for something. It suggests that something has its starting point or beginning in a particular location or context.

  • For example, a geologist might say, “This rock formation originates in volcanic activity.”
  • In a discussion about the history of a musical genre, someone might say, “Jazz music originates in African American communities in the early 20th century.”
  • A linguist studying word etymology might say, “This word originates in the Latin language.”

11. Descends from

This phrase is used to describe the origin or source of something. It implies a direct lineage or connection between the past and present.

  • For example, “The modern art movement descends from the avant-garde artists of the early 20th century.”
  • In a discussion about language, one might say, “English descends from Old English, which in turn descends from Germanic languages.”
  • A historian might explain, “The tradition of storytelling descends from ancient oral traditions passed down through generations.”

12. Can be traced back to

This phrase suggests that the origin or source of something can be identified or discovered by following a trail of evidence or historical records.

  • For instance, “The tradition of exchanging wedding rings can be traced back to ancient Egypt.”
  • In a discussion about culinary traditions, one might say, “The use of spices in Indian cuisine can be traced back to ancient trade routes.”
  • A genealogist might explain, “By examining birth records and family trees, we can trace our ancestry back several generations.”

13. Has its roots in

This phrase indicates that something has its origins or beginnings in a particular place, time, or cultural context.

  • For example, “Rock and roll music has its roots in African American blues and gospel traditions.”
  • In a discussion about fashion trends, one might say, “The popularity of high-waisted jeans has its roots in the fashion of the 1970s.”
  • A linguist might explain, “The English language has its roots in a blend of Germanic, Latin, and French influences.”

14. Is born from

This phrase suggests that something emerges or comes into existence as a result of certain circumstances or influences.

  • For instance, “Great inventions are often born from a combination of curiosity, necessity, and ingenuity.”
  • In a discussion about artistic inspiration, one might say, “Many masterpieces are born from the artist’s personal experiences and emotions.”
  • A scientist might explain, “A new theory is born from careful observation, experimentation, and analysis of data.”

15. Is a product of

This phrase implies that something is the outcome or consequence of a particular process or set of factors.

  • For example, “The success of a business is often a product of hard work, innovation, and market demand.”
  • In a discussion about societal changes, one might say, “Urbanization is a product of population growth and economic development.”
  • A psychologist might explain, “A person’s behavior is a product of their thoughts, emotions, and past experiences.”

16. Is a result of

This phrase is used to describe something that happens or exists because of a specific cause or event. It implies that there is a direct relationship between the cause and the result.

  • For example, “The flooding is a result of heavy rainfall.”
  • In a discussion about the economy, one might say, “The recession is a result of poor financial management.”
  • A scientist might explain, “The mutation is a result of a genetic anomaly.”

17. Is derived from

This phrase indicates that something has its origins or is derived from a specific source or origin. It implies a connection or relationship between the source and the derived entity.

  • For instance, The word ‘cat’ is derived from the Old English word ‘catt.’
  • In a discussion about cultural traditions, one might say, “This festival is derived from ancient pagan rituals.”
  • A historian might explain, “The design of this building is derived from classical Greek architecture.”

18. Is sourced from

This phrase suggests that something is obtained or acquired from a specific source or origin. It implies that the source is the provider or supplier of the item or information.

  • For example, “The ingredients for this recipe are sourced from local farmers.”
  • In a discussion about a news article, one might say, “The information in this article is sourced from reliable sources.”
  • A business owner might explain, “Our products are sourced from sustainable and ethical suppliers.”

19. Is rooted in

This phrase indicates that something has its origins or is deeply connected to a specific source or origin. It implies a strong and fundamental relationship between the source and the entity being described.

  • For instance, “The tradition of gift-giving during Christmas is rooted in ancient Roman customs.”
  • In a discussion about societal norms, one might say, “Gender inequality is rooted in patriarchal systems.”
  • A linguist might explain, “The English language is rooted in Germanic and Romance languages.”

20. Is based on

This phrase suggests that something is built upon or founded on a specific source or origin. It implies that the source provides the framework or basis for the entity being described.

  • For example, “This movie is based on a true story.”
  • In a discussion about scientific theories, one might say, “This hypothesis is based on empirical evidence.”
  • An architect might explain, “The design of this building is based on principles of sustainable architecture.”

21. Is influenced by

This phrase is used to describe something that is influenced or inspired by something else. It suggests that the origin or source of the thing in question can be traced back to the influence of something or someone else.

  • For example, “The fashion trends of the 90s were heavily influenced by hip-hop culture.”
  • In a discussion about art, someone might say, “This painting is clearly influenced by the works of Picasso.”
  • When talking about a particular style of cooking, a chef might explain, “This dish is influenced by traditional Italian flavors.”

22. Is connected to

This phrase implies a connection or link between something and its origin or source. It suggests that there is a relationship between the two, and that the origin or source can be identified or discovered by examining the thing in question.

  • For instance, “The history of this ancient ritual can be traced back to ancient Egypt.”
  • In a discussion about language, someone might say, “The word ‘coffee’ can be traced back to the Arabic word ‘qahwah’.”
  • When discussing the origins of a particular tradition, someone might explain, “This holiday tradition is connected to ancient pagan rituals.”

23. Is linked to

This phrase suggests a connection or association between something and its origin or source. It implies that the origin or source can be attributed or assigned to the thing in question, and that there is evidence or information to support this connection.

  • For example, “The rise of social media can be attributed to advancements in technology.”
  • In a discussion about music, someone might say, “This genre is linked to the African American community and their experiences.”
  • When talking about a particular invention, someone might explain, “The development of this technology can be linked to the work of multiple scientists and engineers.”

24. Roots in

This phrase indicates that something has its origin or source in something else. It suggests that the thing in question can be traced back to its roots or beginnings, and that these roots or beginnings are the foundation or basis of the thing.

  • For instance, “The tradition of exchanging wedding rings roots in ancient Roman customs.”
  • In a discussion about literature, someone might say, “This novel roots in the author’s personal experiences.”
  • When discussing the origins of a particular style of music, someone might explain, “This genre roots in the blues and jazz traditions.”

25. Has its origins in

This phrase implies that something has its origins or beginnings in something else. It suggests that the origin or source of the thing in question can be identified or discovered by examining its history or development.

  • For example, “The concept of democracy has its origins in ancient Greece.”
  • In a discussion about fashion, someone might say, “This trend has its origins in the punk subculture of the 1970s.”
  • When talking about a particular scientific theory, someone might explain, “This theory has its origins in the observations and experiments of a famous scientist.”

26. Is associated with

This phrase is used to describe something that is connected or linked to a particular source or origin. It implies that the slang term has a close relationship with its origin.

  • For example, “The slang term ‘lit’ is associated with the party culture of the 1990s.”
  • In a discussion about music genres, someone might say, “Hip-hop is associated with the streets and urban culture.”
  • A slang term like “on fleek” can be associated with the beauty and fashion industry.
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27. Is tied to

This phrase suggests that the slang term has a direct connection or dependency on a specific source or origin. It implies that the term has its roots in that particular source.

  • For instance, “The slang term ‘bae’ is tied to African American Vernacular English (AAVE).”
  • In a discussion about internet slang, someone might say, “Many abbreviations used in chatrooms are tied to the early days of instant messaging.”
  • A slang term like “lit” can be tied to the influence of popular music and culture.

28. Arises out of

This phrase indicates that the slang term originates or develops from a specific source or situation. It suggests that the term has grown or evolved out of that particular context.

  • For example, “The slang term ‘hangry’ arises out of the combination of ‘hungry’ and ‘angry’.”
  • In a discussion about slang in sports, someone might say, “Many sports-related slang terms arise out of the unique language used by athletes and fans.”
  • A slang term like “bae” can arise out of the need for a shorthand term to refer to a romantic partner.

29. Grows out of

This phrase implies that the slang term develops or originates from a particular source or situation. It suggests that the term has grown organically out of that specific context.

  • For instance, “The slang term ‘selfie’ grows out of the rise of smartphone technology and social media.”
  • In a discussion about slang in the LGBTQ+ community, someone might say, “Many slang terms grow out of the need for coded language and a sense of community.”
  • A slang term like “lit” can grow out of the popularity and influence of certain artists or subcultures.
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30. Develops from

This phrase indicates that the slang term undergoes a process of development or change from a particular source or origin. It suggests that the term has evolved over time from its original form.

  • For example, “The slang term ‘cool’ develops from African American Vernacular English (AAVE) and jazz culture.”
  • In a discussion about slang in technology, someone might say, “Many tech-related slang terms develop from the language used by programmers and early adopters.”
  • A slang term like “bae” can develop from the abbreviation of the word “before anyone else.”

31. Comes about from

This phrase is used to describe the source or origin of something. It implies that a certain event, situation, or outcome is a result of a specific cause or circumstance.

  • For example, “The idea for this project comes about from a conversation I had with a friend.”
  • In a discussion about the origins of a tradition, someone might say, “The tradition of exchanging gifts during Christmas comes about from ancient pagan rituals.”
  • A chef might explain, “The unique flavor of this dish comes about from the combination of spices used in the recipe.”

32. Takes inspiration from

This phrase is used to indicate that something has been influenced or motivated by another source or idea. It suggests that the subject has borrowed elements or ideas from a different context or inspiration.

  • For instance, “This artwork takes inspiration from nature and incorporates organic shapes and colors.”
  • In a conversation about fashion, someone might say, “This designer’s collection takes inspiration from 1920s flapper style.”
  • A musician might explain, “This song takes inspiration from jazz and incorporates improvisation and syncopated rhythms.”

33. Is born out of

This phrase is used to express that something has originated or emerged from a particular situation or circumstance. It implies that the subject has its roots in a specific context or experience.

  • For example, “The idea for this invention is born out of a need for more sustainable energy solutions.”
  • In a discussion about a new business venture, someone might say, “This company is born out of the founder’s passion for helping others.”
  • A writer might explain, “This novel is born out of personal experiences and explores themes of identity and belonging.”

34. Is founded in

This phrase is used to convey that something is based on or established in a particular foundation or principle. It suggests that the subject has its origins or core in a specific belief, concept, or value.

  • For instance, “This organization is founded in the belief that everyone deserves equal opportunities.”
  • In a conversation about a philosophy, someone might say, “This theory is founded in the idea of existentialism.”
  • An architect might explain, “The design of this building is founded in sustainable principles and eco-friendly materials.”

35. Is developed from

This phrase is used to indicate that something has progressed or grown from a previous form or idea. It suggests that the subject has undergone a process of transformation or refinement.

  • For example, “This software is developed from an earlier prototype and includes additional features and improvements.”
  • In a discussion about technology, someone might say, “Virtual reality has developed from early experiments in immersive simulations.”
  • A chef might explain, “This recipe is developed from a traditional family dish and incorporates modern flavors and techniques.”

36. Is generated from

This phrase is used to describe something that is created or produced from a specific source or origin. It implies that the subject is a result or product of that source.

  • For example, “The electricity in our homes is generated from power plants.”
  • In a discussion about renewable energy, one might say, “Solar power is generated from the sun’s rays.”
  • A scientist explaining a chemical reaction might say, “The heat is generated from the exothermic reaction.”

37. Is related to

This phrase is used to indicate that there is a connection or association between two things. It implies that there is some level of similarity or shared characteristics.

  • For instance, “The English language is related to German.”
  • In a discussion about music genres, one might say, “Jazz is related to blues and gospel music.”
  • A historian discussing historical events might say, “The French Revolution is related to the American Revolution.”

38. Is descended from

This phrase is used to describe something that can be traced back to a specific ancestor or origin. It implies a direct lineage or descent from that source.

  • For example, “Modern humans are descended from ancient hominids.”
  • In a discussion about family history, one might say, “I am descended from Italian immigrants.”
  • A genealogist researching a family tree might note, “This family line is descended from royalty.”

39. Is inherited from

This phrase is used to describe something that is received or acquired from one’s ancestors or predecessors. It implies that the subject has been handed down through generations.

  • For instance, “Traditions are often inherited from one’s cultural heritage.”
  • In a discussion about family heirlooms, one might say, “This necklace was inherited from my grandmother.”
  • A chef discussing a recipe might say, “The secret ingredient was inherited from my great-grandmother.”

40. Is passed down from

This phrase is used to describe something that is transferred or handed down from one generation to the next. It implies a continuation of the subject from the past to the present.

  • For example, “Family values are passed down from parents to children.”
  • In a discussion about craftsmanship, one might say, “This skill is passed down from master to apprentice.”
  • A storyteller talking about cultural traditions might note, “Oral histories are passed down from elders to younger generations.”

41. Is handed down from

This phrase is used to describe something that is passed from one generation to another, typically through family or cultural traditions.

  • For example, “The recipe for this dish is handed down from my grandmother.”
  • A person might say, “The story of our ancestors is handed down from generation to generation.”
  • In a discussion about cultural practices, someone might mention, “These traditions are handed down from our ancestors.”

42. Is handed on from

Similar to “is handed down from,” this phrase also refers to the passing of something from one generation to another.

  • For instance, “The family heirloom is handed on from parent to child.”
  • In a conversation about cultural heritage, someone might say, “Our traditions are handed on from one generation to the next.”
  • A person discussing the importance of education might note, “Knowledge is handed on from teacher to student.”

43. Is transferred from

This phrase is used to describe the act of passing something from one person or place to another.

  • For example, “The virus is transferred from person to person through close contact.”
  • In a discussion about knowledge, someone might say, “Ideas are transferred from one mind to another.”
  • A person discussing the spread of information might note, “News is transferred from one social media platform to another.”

44. Is transmitted from

Similar to “is transferred from,” this phrase also refers to the passing of something from one person or place to another.

  • For instance, “The disease is transmitted from infected individuals to healthy individuals.”
  • In a conversation about cultural influence, someone might say, “Traditions are transmitted from one society to another.”
  • A person discussing genetics might note, “Genes are transmitted from parents to their offspring.”

45. Is brought from

This phrase is used to describe something that is brought or carried from one place to another.

  • For example, “The ingredients for this dish are brought from the local market.”
  • In a discussion about travel, someone might say, “Souvenirs are brought from different countries.”
  • A person discussing cultural exchange might note, “New ideas and customs are brought from other cultures.”

46. Is imported from

When something is imported, it means it is brought into a country from another country. This term is often used when talking about goods or products that are produced in one country and then sold in another.

  • For example, “This brand of coffee is imported from Colombia.”
  • In a discussion about international trade, someone might say, “The majority of our electronics are imported from China.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you know where this wine is imported from?”

47. Is exported from

When something is exported, it means it is produced in one country and then sent to another country for sale or distribution. This term is often used when talking about goods or products that are produced domestically and then sold internationally.

  • For instance, “This car is exported from Germany to various countries around the world.”
  • In a conversation about the economy, someone might say, “Our country’s main export is agricultural products.”
  • A person might ask, “Which countries does this company export its products to?”

48. Is shipped from

When something is shipped, it means it is transported or sent from one place to another, often by ship. This term is commonly used when referring to the movement of goods or products.

  • For example, “The package is shipped from the warehouse to the customer’s address.”
  • In a discussion about online shopping, someone might say, “Most of my orders are shipped from overseas.”
  • A person might ask, “How long does it usually take for items to be shipped from this store?”

49. Is sent from

When something is sent, it means it is delivered or dispatched from one place to another. This term is often used when referring to the act of sending a letter, package, or message.

  • For instance, “The package is sent from the post office to the recipient’s address.”
  • In a conversation about communication, someone might say, “I received an email sent from my coworker.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you send me the document from your computer?”

50. Is obtained from

When something is obtained, it means it is acquired or gained from a source. This term is often used when talking about obtaining or acquiring something, such as knowledge, information, or resources.

  • For example, “The data is obtained from various research studies.”
  • In a discussion about sourcing ingredients, someone might say, “The spices used in this recipe are obtained from local farmers.”
  • A person might ask, “Where can I obtain more information about this topic?”

51. Is acquired from

This phrase is used to describe the source or origin of something. It implies that something is gained or obtained from a specific place or person.

  • For example, “The recipe for this dish is acquired from my grandmother.”
  • A writer might say, “The inspiration for this story is acquired from real-life events.”
  • Someone discussing language might explain, “English is a language that is acquired from a combination of Latin, Germanic, and French influences.”

52. Is gleaned from

This phrase suggests that something is obtained or gathered, often through careful examination or research. It implies that information or knowledge is collected from various sources.

  • For instance, “The data for this report is gleaned from multiple surveys.”
  • A researcher might say, “My findings are gleaned from years of studying this subject.”
  • Someone discussing a book might mention, “The author’s insights are gleaned from personal experiences and interviews with experts.”

53. Is extracted from

This phrase indicates that something is taken or derived from a specific source or origin. It implies that information, substance, or meaning is obtained by extracting it from its original context.

  • For example, “The key points in this presentation are extracted from a larger research study.”
  • A scientist might say, “The chemical compound is extracted from natural plant sources.”
  • A linguist might explain, “The word ‘robot’ is extracted from the Czech word for ‘forced labor.'”

54. Is taken from

This phrase suggests that something is obtained or derived from a particular source. It implies that something is borrowed or used as inspiration from its original context.

  • For instance, “The dialogue in this play is taken from real-life conversations.”
  • A musician might say, “The melody is taken from a traditional folk song.”
  • Someone discussing a painting might mention, “The artist’s style is taken from the impressionist movement.”

55. Is borrowed from

This phrase indicates that something is used, adapted, or imitated from another source. It implies that something is borrowed or used as inspiration from its original context.

  • For example, “The plot of this movie is borrowed from a classic novel.”
  • A fashion designer might say, “The design elements are borrowed from vintage clothing.”
  • Someone discussing a recipe might mention, “The flavors are borrowed from traditional Mediterranean cuisine.”

56. Is adapted from

This phrase is used to indicate that something has been modified or changed from its original form or source. It implies that the new version is based on or influenced by the original.

  • For example, a movie might be described as “adapted from a bestselling novel.”
  • In a discussion about music, someone might say, “This song is adapted from a traditional folk tune.”
  • A chef might create a new recipe and say, “This dish is adapted from a classic French recipe.”

57. Is inspired by

This phrase suggests that something has been influenced or motivated by a particular source or idea. It indicates that the new creation has been inspired by the original.

  • For instance, an artist might say, “This painting is inspired by nature.”
  • In a conversation about fashion, someone might say, “This collection is inspired by 1920s glamour.”
  • A writer might acknowledge, “My novel is inspired by true events.”